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Full text of "The Graduate school catalog"

STATE COLLEGE RECORD 



THE 
GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 



1960-1962 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE COLLEGE 




STATE COLLEGE RECORD 

Vol. 59, No. 5, January, 1960 

Published monthly by the North Carolina State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering. Entered as Second-Class Matter October 16, 1917, at the Post 
Office at Raleigh, N. C, Under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL CATALOG 

1960-1962 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
CATALOG 



1960-1962 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



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THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Summer Sessions 

1960 

First Session 


June 14 


Tues. 


June 15 


Wed. 


June 20 


Mon. 


June 24 


Fri. 


June 30 


Thurs. 


July 4 
July 14 


Mon. 
Thurs. 


July 20 
July 21 


Wed. 
Thurs. 


Second Session 


July 22 


Fri. 


July 25 
July 29 


Mon. 
Fri. 


August 3 


Wed. 


August 5 


Fri. 


August 19 


Fri. 


August 25 
August 26 


Thurs, 
Fri. 


Fall Semester 
1960 


September 16 


Fri. 


September 19 
September 23 


Mon. 
Fri. 



September 30 Fri. 



Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 
payable by all who register after June 14. 
First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to with- 
draw with refund and last day to drop any 
course with refund. 

Last day to drop courses without failure and 
last day to withdraw without failure. 
Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in July. 
Holiday 

Last day for taking final oral examination for 
candidates for the master's and doctoral de- 
grees in July. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 
payable by all registering after July 22. 
First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to with- 
draw with refund and last day to drop any 
course with refund. 

Last day to drop a course without failure and 
last day to withdraw without failure. 
Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in Au- 
gust. 

Last day for taking final oral examination for 
candidates for the master's and doctoral de- 
grees in August. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 
payable by all who register after September 16. 
Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

Last day for registration. Last day for refund 
less $5.00 registration fee. Last day for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for stu- 
dents expecting to complete requirements for 
the master's degree in January. 
Last day to add a course. 



♦Applications for admission to the Graduate School, accompanied by full credentials in the 
form of transcripts of academic records, should be filed in the office of the Graduate Dean 
at least thirty days in advance of the semester in which admission is sought. 



3 



October 7 



November 7 



Fri. 



Mon. 



November 12 Sat. 

November 23 Wed. 

November 28 Mon. 

November 29 Tues. 



December 17 


Sat. 


December 19 


Mon. 


January 2, 1961 


. Mon. 


January 3 


Tues. 


January 16 


Mon. 


January 21 


Sat. 


January 23 


Mon. 


January 23-28 


Mon.-Sat, 


January 30 


Mon. 


Spring Semester 


1961 




February 3 


Fri. 


February 6 


Mon. 


February 10 


Fri. 



February 


17 


Fri. 


February 


24 


Fri. 


March 25 




Sat. 


March 29 




Wed. 


April 3 




Mon. 


April 6 




Thurs, 


April 8 




Sat. 


April 17 




Mon. 


May 1 




Mon. 



Last day to drop a course without failure. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations 
for students expecting to receive doctorate in 
May. 

Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of 
the Consolidated University. 
Mid-term reports. 

Thanksgiving holidays begin at 1:00 p.m. 
Classwork resumes 8:00 a.m. 
Last day to withdraw from school without 
failures. 

Christmas holidays begin at 12:00 noon. 
Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree in January. 
Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the master's degree in January. 
Classwork resumes 8:00 a.m. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the master's degree in Jan- 
uary. 

Last day of classes. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the Ph.D. degree in Jan- 
uary. 

Final examinations. 

Awarding of degrees for graduating students. 



Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 
payable by all who register after February 3. 
Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to register. Last day for refund less 
$5.00 registration fee. Last day for filing ap- 
plication for admission to candidacy for stu- 
dents expecting to complete requirements for 
the master's degree in May. 
Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop a course without failure. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations 
for students expecting to receive doctorate in 
August. 

Mid-term reports. 
Easter holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 
Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of 
the Consolidated University. 
Classwork resumes 7:45 a.m. 
Last day for withdrawing from school without 
failures. 

Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree in May. 
Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the master's degree in May. 



May 13 
May 20 



Sat. 
Sat. 



May 27 Sat. 

May 28 Sun. 

May 29-June 3 Mon.-Sat. 

Fall Semester 

(tentative calendar) 

1961 

September 15 Fri. 

September 18 Mon. 
September 22 Fri. 



September 29 Fri. 
October 6 Fri. 



November 6 


Mon. 


November 11 


Sat. 


November 22 


Wed. 


November 27 


Mon. 


November 28 


Tues. 


December 16 


Sat. 


December 18 


Mon. 



January 2, 1962 Tues. 



January 15 

January 20 
January 22 



Mon. 

Sat. 
Mon. 



January 22-27 Mon.-Sat. 
January 29 Mon. 

Spring Semester 

(tentative calendar) 

1962 



February 2 
February 5 



Fri. 
Mon. 



Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the master's degree in May. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the Ph.D. degree in May. 
Last day of classes. 
Commencement. 
Final examinations. 



Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 pay- 
able by all who register after September 15. 
Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

Last day for registration. Last day for refund 
less $5.00 registration fee. Last day for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for 
students expecting to complete requirements 
for the master's degree in January. 
Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop a course without failure. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations 
for students expecting to receive doctorate in 
May. 

Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of 

the Consolidated University. 

Mid-term reports. 

Thanksgiving holiday begins 1:00 p.m. 

Classwork resumes 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to withdraw from school without 

failures. 

Christmas holidays begin at 12:00 noon. 

Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree in January. 
Classwork resumes 8:00 a.m. Last day for ac- 
cepting theses for candidates for the master's 
degree in January. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the master's degree in 
January. 

Last day of classes. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations 

for candidates for the Ph.D. degree in 

January. 

Final examinations. 

Awarding of degrees for graduating students. 



Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 
payable by all who register after February 2. 
Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 



February 9 



Fri. 



February 16 


Fri. 


February 23 


Fri. 


March 24 


Sat. 


April 2 


Mon. 


April 6 


Sat. 


April 16 


Mon. 


April 18 


Wed. 


April 26 


Thurs. 


April 30 


Mon. 


May 12 


Sat. 


May 19 


Sat. 


May 26 


Sat. 


May 27 


Sun. 


May 28-June 2 


Mon-Sat, 



Last day to register. Last day for refund less 
$5.00 registration fee. Last day for filing ap- 
plication for admission to candidacy for stu- 
dents expecting to complete requirements for 
the master's degree in May. 
Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop a course without failure. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations 
for students expecting to receive doctorate in 
August. 

Mid-term reports. 

Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of 
the Consolidated University. 
Last day for withdrawing from school with- 
out failures. 

Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree in May. 
Easter holiday begins at 6:00 p.m. 
Classwork resumes 7:45 a.m. 
Last day for accepting theses for candidates 
for the master's degree in May. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the master's degree in May. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations 
for candidates for the Ph.D. degree in May. 
Last day of classes. 
Commencement 
Final examinations. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LLB., President 

William M. Whyburn, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Vice-President, Graduate 
Studies and Research 

Donald B. Anderson, B.A., B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Provost 

William Donald Carmichael, Jr., S.B. Comm., Vice-President and Finance 
Officer 

John T. Caldwell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor. 

J. G. Vann, Assistant Controller and Business Manager 

Harlan C. Brown, B.A., B.S., A.M., Librarian 

J. J. Stewart, B.S., M.A., Dean of Student Affairs 

Kenneth D. Raab, B.A., M.A., Director of Admissions and Registration 

E. Glenn Overton, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director of Admissions and Regis- 
tration 

Joseph J. Combs, M.D., College Physician 

The Graduate School 

William M. Whyburn, Ph.D., Vice-President, Graduate Studies and Research 
Walter J. Peterson, Ph.D., Dean, N. C. State College. 
Patsy J. Haywood, B.S., Assistant to the Dean 
Joyce L. Poole, Secretary 

The Administrative Board 

Walter J. Peterson, Ph.D., Dean 

Roy N. Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Head of Department 

of Occupational Information and Guidance— Term expires October 

1963. 

John Lincoln Etchells, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Industry, Botany and 
Horticulture— Term expires November, 1962. 

Ralph Eigil Fadum, S.D., Professor of Civil Engineering, Head of Depart- 
ment — Term expires October, 1961. 

John F. Lee, MS., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Head of Depart- 
ment — Term expires November, 1963. 

Roy Lee Lowom, Ph.D., Professor of Field Crops and Director of Research 
in the School of Agriculture — Term expires January, 1961. 

T. Ewald Maki, Ph.D., Professor of Forest Management— Term expires 
August, 1960. 

Edward Anne Murray, Ph.D., Professor of Textile Chemistry and Director 
of Instruction— Term expires October, 1960. 

The Executive Council 

The Executive Council is made up of the members of the Advisory Boards 
of each of the three units of the Consolidated University. The President 
the Vice-Presidents, the Chancellors and the Graduate Deans are ex-officio 
members of the Executive Council. 



THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

George Alexander Heard, Ph.D., Dean 

Wayne Alexander Bowers, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

Frederic Neill Cleaveland, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science 

and Research Associate in the Institute for Research in Social Science 
Werner Paul Friederick, Ph.D., Professor of German and Comparative 

Literature 
Glen Haydon, Ph.D., Kenan Professor of Music and Chairman of Music 

Department 
Alan Keith-Lucas, M.A., M.Sc. (Soc. Adm.), Professor of Social Work 
Clifford Pierson Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of English 
Augustus Taylor Miller, Jr., Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Physiology 
John Albert Parker, M. Arch., M.C.P., Professor of City and Regional 

Planning, Research Professor in the Institute for Research and Social 

Science 
Haywood Arnold Perry, Ed.D., Professor of Education and Dean of the 

School of Education 
Billy James Pettis, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
Ralph William Pfouts, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Research Professor 

in the Institute for Research and Social Science 
John Joseph Wright, M.P.H., Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public 

Health 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD AT THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Junius A. Davis, Ph.D., Dean 

Helen Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

Jean Gagen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Kenneth E. Howe, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

Gregory D. Ivy, M.A., Professor of Art 

Vance T. Littlejohn, Ph.D., Professor of Business Education 

Ethel L. Martus, M. S., Professor of Physical Education 

Mereb E. Mossman, M. A., Dean of the College and Professor of Sociology 

(ex officio) 
Lee Rigsby, Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Music 
Irwin V. Sperry, Ed.D., Professor of Home Economics 

GRADUATE FACULTY* 

at 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Clifton A. Anderson, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Head of 
Department. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



•Membership in the graduate faculty may be in either of two categories: (1) Full status or 
(2) Associate status. Full status permits a faculty member to engage in any and all phases 
of the graduate programs of the college. Associate members may teach courses at the graduate 
level and participate in the planning of graduate student programs. They may not serve aa 
chairmen of advisory committees or assume responsibility for the direction of the research 
studies of graduate students. 

8 



Richard Loree Anderson, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Roy Nels Anderson, Professor of Education, Head of Department of Occu- 
pational Information and Guidance. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Jay Lawrence Apple, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Clarence Monroe Asbill, Jr., Professor of Textile Machine Design and 
Development. 

B.S., Clemson College. 

Leonard William Aurand, Research Associate Professor of Animal Industry 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

William Wyatt Austin, Jr., Professor of Metallurgical Engineering and Head 
of Department of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Robert Aycock, Research Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 

Ph.D.. N. C. State College. 

Ernest Ball, Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D. University of California. 

Walter E. Ballinger, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

Clifford W. Barber, Professor of Poultry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

William John Barclay, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Frederick Schenck Barkalow, Jr., Professor of Zoology and Head of De- 
partment. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Key Lee Barkley, Professor of Psychology and Director of Applied Experi- 
mental Psychology Laboratory. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Elliott Roy Barrick, Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 

William Victor Bartholomew, Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Edward Guy Batte, Professor of Animal Industry. 

D.V.M., Texas A & M. 

Ernest Oscar Beal, Associate Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Kenneth Orion Beatty, Jr., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Burton Floyd Beers, Assistant Professor of History and Political Science 

Ph.D., Duke University 

Norman R. Bell, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

M.S., Cornell University. 

Thomas A. Bell, Associate Professor of Animal Industry 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

William Galium Bell, Research Professor of Ceramic Engineering in Engi- 
neering Research. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Ernest B. Berry, Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

B.S., Clemson College. 

James Samuel Bethel, Professor of Wood Technology. 

D.F., Duke University. 



Charles Edwin Bishop, Reynolds Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

William Joseph Block, Assistant Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

William Lowry Blow, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

T. N. Blumer, Professor of Animal Industry. 
Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

John Francis Bogdan, Professor of Textiles and Applied Research Tech- 
nologist. 

B.T.E., Lowel Textile Institute. 

Carey H. Bostian, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Henry Dittimus Bowen, Associate Professor of Agricultural Enginereing. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

Thomas Glenn Bowery, Research Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

Charles Raymond Bramer, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

E.M., Michigan College of Mining and Technology. 

Bartholomew Brandner Brandt, Professor Emeritus of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

Charles H. Brett, Research Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Kansas State College. 

Richard Bright, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

M.S., State University of Iowa. 

Charles A. Brim, Associate Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 

Henry Seawell Brown, Assistant Professor of Geological Engineering. 

Ph. D., University of Illinois. 

Marvin L. Brown, Jr., Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Roberts Cozart Bullock, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Robert L. Bunting, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

George Charles Caldwell, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

John Tyler Caldwell, Professor of Political Science and Chancellor. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Kenneth Stoddard Campbell, Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

B.S., Bates College. 

Malcolm Eugene Campbell, Dean of the School of Textiles. 

B.S., Clemson College. 

William V. Campbell, Research Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

■ . N. C. State College. 

Irving T. Carlson, Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., Professor of Industrial Engineering and 
Director of Instruction for School of Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Melvin W. Carter, Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D.. N. C. State College. 

Roy Merwin Carter, Professor of Wood Technology. 

M.S., Michigan State College. 
10 



David Marshall Cates, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 

John Wesley Cell, Professor of Mathematics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Douglas Scales Chamblee, Associate Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

John Montgomery Clarkson, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Albert J. Clawson, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Carlyle Newton Clayton, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Fred Derward Cochran, Professor of Horticulture and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Columbus Clark Cockerham, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Nathaniel Terry Coleman, Reynolds Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Dean Wallace Colvard, Professor of Animal Industry and Dean of the 
School of Agriculture. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Norval White Conner, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director 
of Department of Engineering Research. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 

Eustace R. Conway, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Freeman Waldo Cook, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

John Oliver Cook, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., New York University. 

Arthur W. Cooper, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

William Earl Cooper, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Alonzo F. Coots, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Will A. Cope, Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Harold Maxwell Corter, Professor of Psychology, Director of Psychological 
Clinic. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

Arthur James Coutu, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Gertrude Mary Cox, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 

Paul D. Cribbins, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 

William R. Davis, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Doktor der Naturwiss, University of Hanover, Germany. 

Emmett Urcey Dillard, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Wesley Osborne Doggett, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Jesse Seymour Doolittle, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., Pennsylvania State College. 

11 



Robert Alden Douglas, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Donald W. Drewes, Instructor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 

John W. Dudley, Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D.. Iowa State College. 

Preston William Edsall, Professor of History and Political Science and 
Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Don Edwin Ellis, Professor of Plant Pathology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Donald A. Emery, Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

John Lincoln Etchells, Professor of Animal Industry, Botany and Horticul- 
ture. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

Harold J. Evans, Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

Ralph Eigil Fadum, Professor of Civil Engineering and Head of Department. 

S.D.. Harvard University. 

Maurice H. Farrier, Research Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Alva Leroy Finkner, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

James Walter Fitts, Professor of Soils and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Jack Fleischer, Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

Raoul M. Freyre, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Havana, Cuba. 

Daniel Fromm, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Gerald Garb, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Monroe Evans Gardner, Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Henry Wilburn Garren, Associate Professor of Poultry. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

John Bernard Gartner, Research Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

Robert Theodore Gast, Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cornel! University. 

Dan Ulrich Gerstel, Research Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

George Wallace Giles, Head of Department and Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

M.S., University of Missouri. 

Edward Walker Glazener, Professor of Poultry Science and Head of Depart- 
ment. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Gennaro L. Goglia, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Charles F. Goldthwaite, Visiting Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

12 



Lemuel Goode, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

M.S., University of West Virginia. 

Arnold H. E. Grandage, Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Clifton W. Gray, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Walton Carlyle Gregory, Reynolds Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Daniel Swartwood Grosch, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Harry Douglass Gross, Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Elliott Brown Grover, Abel C. Lineberger Professor of Yarn Manufacturing; 
Head, Department of Yarn Manufacturing, School of Textiles. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

George Albert Gullette, Professor of Social Studies and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Frank Edwin Guthrie, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Frank Arlo Haasis, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

William Cullen Hackler, Associate Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College 

Robert John Hader, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Dame Scott Hamby, Burlington Industries Professor of Textiles. 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Charles Horace Hamilton, Head of Department and Professor of Rural 
Sociology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Karl P. Hanson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., University of Michigan. 

James W. Hardin, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Ph. D., University of Michigan. 

Reinard Harkema, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

Cleon Wallace Harrell, Associate Professor of Economics. 

M.A., University of Virginia. 

Walter Joel Harrington, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Lee Harrisberger, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., University of Colorado. 

Clarence Arthur Hart, Research Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Lodwick Charles Hartley, Professor of English and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Paul H. Harvey, Reynolds Professor of Field Crops and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Francis Jefferson Hassler, Research Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

William Walton Hassler, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

Arthur Courtney Hayes, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 



13 



Frank Lloyd Haynes, Jr., Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Teddy Theodore Hebert, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D.. N. C. State College. 

William Ray Henry, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

C. Addison Hickman, Professor of Economics and Dean of the School of 
General Studies. 

Ph.D.. State University of Iowa. 

Charles Horace Hill, Professor of Poultry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Thomas I. Hines, Professor of Industrial and Rural Recreation and Head 
of Department. 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Hedwig Hirschmann, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Erlangen, Germany. 

George Burnham Hoadley, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Head of 
of Department. 

D.Sc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Abraham Holtzman, Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Maurice W. Hoover, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 

John William Horn, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S.C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Ivan Hostetler, Professor of Industrial Arts Education and Head of Depart- 
ment. 

Ed.D., University of Missouri. 

Leo Josef Huetter, Research Associate Professor of Engineering Research. 

Dr. rer. nat., T. H. Stuttgart, Germany. 

George Hyatt, Jr., Professor of Animal Industry and Head of Department. 

M.S., Rutgers University. 

Thomas F. Irvine, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

William A. Jackson, Assistant Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D.. N. C. State College. 

Gerald Blaine James, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Ed. D., University of Illinois. 

Herman Brooks James, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Director of 
Instruction for the School of Agriculture. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

John Mitchell Jenkins, Jr., Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Harley Y. Jennings, Professor of Textile Research. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Elmer Hubert Johnson, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Ernest Sigurd Johnson, Professor of Furniture Manufacturing and Manage- 
ment. 

M.F., Duke University. 

Joseph Clyde Johnson, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ed.D., Peabody College. 

Guy Langston Jones, Associate Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

14 



Ivan Dunlavy Jones, Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Charles Howard Kahn, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Eugene J. Kamprath, Associate Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Therese M. Kelleher, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Kenneth Raymond Keller, Professor of Field Crops, Assistant Director in 
Charge of Tobacco Research. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Joseph Wheeler Kelly, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Arthur Kelman, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Richard Adams King, M. G. Mann Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 

James Bryant Kirkland, Professor of Agricultural Education and Dean of 
the School of Education. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

David M. Kline, Research Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Glenn Charles Klingman, Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

Richard Bennett Knight, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., University of Illinois. 

Ken-ichi Kojima, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

William Wurth Kriegel, Professor in charge of Ceramic Engineering. 

Dr. Ing., Technische Hochschule, Hanover, Germany. 

Walter Michael Kulash, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts State College. 

Arthur Irish Ladu, Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

John R. Lambert, Associate Professor of Social Studies. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 

John Harold Lampe, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Dean of the 
School of Engineering. 

Dr. Eng., Johns Hopkins University. 

Forrest Wesley Lancaster, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

John Giacomo Lecce, Associate Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Thomas Benson Ledbetter, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

John Francis Lee, Broughton Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Head of Department. 

M.S., Harvard University. 

Joshua A. Lee, Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

James Edward Legates, Reynolds Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Jack Levine, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 



15 



Clarence Earl Libby, Reuben B. Robertson Professor of Pulp and Paper 
Technology. 

Ch.E., University of Maine. 

John S. Little, Visiting Lecturer in Industrial Engineering. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Robert W. Llewellyn, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

M.S., Purdue University. 

Richard Henry Loeppert, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 

George Gilbert Long, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D.. University of Florida. 

Roy Lee Lovvorn, Professor of Field Crops and Director of Research in 
the School of Agriculture. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

George Blanchard Lucas, Research Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Henry Laurence Lucas, Jr., Reynolds Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

James Fulton Lutz, Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Joseph Thomas Lynn, Associate Professor of Physics. 

M.S., Ohio State University. 

Glenn C. McCann, Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology. 

Ph.D., Washington State College. 

Charles B. McCants, Associate Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Robert E. McCollum, Research Assistant Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Clarence Leslie McCombs, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Ralph J. McCracken, Associate Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Charles Russell McCullough, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S., Purdue University. 

Patrick Hill McDonald, Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Graduate Administrator. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

William McGehee, Visiting Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Peabody College. 

John Joseph McNeill, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Francis Edward McVay, Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

James G. Maddox, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 

T. Ewald Maki, Carl Alwin Schenck Professor of Forest Management. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Carroll Lamb Mann, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

C.E., Princeton University. 

Thurston Jefferson Mann, Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

David Hamilton Martin, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

M.S., University of Wisconsin. 

David Dickenson Mason, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 
16 



Gennard Matrone, Research Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Dale Frederick Matzinger, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Experimental 
Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Jack R. Mauney, Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Selz Cabot Mayo, Professor of Rural Sociology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Professor of Physics. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

Adolph Mehlich, Research Associate Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Arthur Clayton Menius, Jr., Professor of Physics and and Head of De- 
partment. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Lawrence Eugene Mettler, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Gordon Kennedy Middleton, Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Conrad Henry Miller, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Howard G. Miller, Professor of Psychology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Philip Arthur Miller, Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Iowa State. 

William Dykstra Miller, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 

Walter Joseph Mistric, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., A & M College of Texas. 

Adolphus Mitchell, Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Theodore Bertis Mitchell, Professor of Entomology. 

D.S., Harvard University. 

Richard D. Mochrie, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Robert Harry Moll, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Experimental Sta- 
tistics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Robert James Monroe, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Elmer Leon Moore, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Robert Parker Moore, Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Charles G. Morehead, Associate Professor of Occupational Information and 
Guidance. 

Ed.D., University of Kansas. 

Donald Edwin Moreland, Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Carey Gardner Mumford, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

W. Ray Murley, Associate Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 



17 



Edward A. Murray, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Director of Instruc- 
tion in the School of Textiles. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Raymond LeRoy Murray, Burlington Professor of Physics and Graduate 
Administrator. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

Howard M. Xahikian, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Richard Robert Nelson, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

William A. Newell, Professor of Textiles and Director of the Textile Re- 
search Center. 

B.S., N. C. State College. 

Slater Edmund Newman, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Lowell Wendell Nielsen, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Stuart Noblin, Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Charles Joseph Nusbaum, Reynolds Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Bernard Martin Olsen, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John Clark Osborne, Research Professor of Animal Industry and Head of 
Veterinary Section. 

D.V.M., Michigan State College. 

Hubert Vern Park, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Thomas H. Park, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University. 

John Mason Parker, III, Professor of Geology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Thomas Oliver Perry, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Walter John Peterson, Reynolds Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Wilbur Carroll Peterson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Lyle L. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Walter Henry Pierce, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Frederick Phillips Pike, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Robert McLean Pinkerton, Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 

B. Sc, Bradley University. 

George Waverly Poland, Professor of Modern Languages and Head of De- 
partment. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Daniel Townsend Pope, Research Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Joseph Alexander Porter, Jr., Associate Professor of Textiles. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 



18 



Richard Joseph Preston, Professor of Forestry and Dean of the School of 
Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Thomas Lavalle Quay, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Robert Lamar Rabb, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Harold Arch Ramsey, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Horace D. Rawls, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 
M.S., N. C. State College. 

Preston Harding Reid, Assistant Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Willis Alton Reid, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Ladislas Francis Reitzer, Assistant Professor of History and Political Sci- 
ence. 

Ph.D., School of International Studies. Geneva, Switzerland ; University of Chicago. 

Robert Barton Rice, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.E., Tufts College. 

Frances M. Richardson, Research Associate Professor of Engineering Re- 
search. 

M.S., University of Cincinnati. 

Jackson Ashcraf t Rigney, Professor of Experimental Statistics and Head of 
Department. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 

William Milner Roberts, Professor of Animal Industry and Head of Dairy 
Manufacturing Section. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Cowin Cook Robinson, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Harold Frank Robinson, Professor of Genetics and Experimental Statistics 
and Head of Department of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Nebraska University. 

Paul James Rust, Associate Professor of Psychology and English. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 

Henry Ames Rutherford, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Head of 
Department. 

M.A., George Washington University. 

John A. Santolucito, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Joseph Neal Sasser, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

George Howard Satterfield, Professor of Chemistry. 

M.A., Duke University. 

Clarence Cayce Scarborough, Professor of Agricultural Education and 
Head of Department. 

Ed.D., University of Illinois. 

Edward Martin Schoenborn, Jr., Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Robert Johnson Schramm, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

Herbert Temple Scofield, Professor of Botany and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

19 



John Frank Seely, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State College. 

Heinz Seltmann, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Luther Shaw, Associate Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Ching S. Shen, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Francis Webber Sherwood, Professor Emeritus of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Robert T. Sherwood, Research Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

William Edward Shinn, Chester H. Roth, Professor of Knitting; Head, 
Knitting Department, School of Textiles. 

M. S.. N. C. State College. 

John William Shirley, Professor of English and Dean of the Faculty. 

Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Charles Smallwood, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering and Graduate Ad- 
ministrator. 

M.S., Harvard University. 

William Wesley Garry Smart, Jr., Research Assistant Professor of Animal 
Industry and Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 

Michael V. Smirnoff, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Benjamin Warfield Smith, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Clyde Fuhriman Smith, Professor of Entomology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Frank Houston Smith, Research Associate Professor of Animal Industry. 

M.S.. N. C. State College. 

Rufus Hummer Snyder, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

William Thomas Snyder, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Marvin Luther Speck, Reynolds Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

William Eldon Splinter, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Hans Heinrich Anton Stadelmaier, Research Professor of Mineral Industries. 

M.S., Technische, Hochschule, Stuttgart, Germany. 

Alfred J. Stamm, Research Associate Professor of Wood Technology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Charles J. Standish, Visiting Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

William A. Stephen, Extension Beekeeper in Entomology. 

M.A., University of Toronto, Canada. 

Robert Lawrence Stephens, Research Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Stanley G. Stephens, Reynolds Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Edinburgh University, Scotland. 

William Damon Stevenson, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Graduate Administrator. 

M. S., University of Michigan. 



20 



Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Professor of Animal Industry and Assistant Direc- 
tor of Research in the School of Agriculture. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Robert Franklin Stoops, Research Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Raimond Aldrich Struble, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

Paul Porter Sutton, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Ernst W. Swanson, Professor of Economics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Walter Earl Thomas, Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Donald Loraine Thompson, Associate Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

George Stanford Tolley, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John W. Tomlin, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Huseyin C. Topakoglu, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

D.Sc, Technical University of Istanbul. 

William Douglas Toussaint, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Samuel B. Tove, Research Associate Professor of Animal Industry and 
Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

James Richard Troyer, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Lester Curtis Ulberg, Associate Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Newton Underwood, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Brown University. 

Robert Phillip Upchurch, Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops. 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Mehmet Ensar Uyanik, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Jan van Schilfgaarde, Research Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Richad J. Volk, Associate Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

David Rudger Walker, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Arthur W. Waltner, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Frederick Gail Warren, Associate Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

David S. Weaver, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

Sterling B. Weed, Assistant Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., N. C. State College. 

Bertram W. Wells, Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Joseph Arthur Weybrew, Reynolds Professor of Agronomy and Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

21 



Raymond Cyrus White, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., West Virginia University. 

John Kerr Whitfield, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S.. N. C. State College. 

Larry Alston Whitford, Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Benjamin Lincoln Whittier, Edgar and Emily Hesslein Professor of Fabric 
Development and Construction, School of Textiles. 

B.S., Williams College. 

Rudolph Willard, Visiting Lecturer in Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.B., Yale University. 

Carlos Frost Williams, Professor of Horticulture. 

M.S., N. C. State College. 

James Claude Williamson, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

M.S.. N. C. State College. 

Nash Nicks Winstead, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Sanford Richard Winston, Professor of Sociology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Lowell Sheridan Winton, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 

George Herman Wise, Reynolds Professor of Animal Industry; Head, Ani- 
mal Nutrition Section. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Milton B. Wise, Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Willie Garland Woltz, Professor of Soils. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

James Woodburn, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Dr. Engr., Johns Hopkins University. 

William Walton Woodhouse, Professor of Soils. 

Ph. D., Cornell University. 

David Allan Young, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

James N. Young, Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology. 

Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

Talmage Brian Young, Associate Professor of Industrial Arts Education. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Bruce J. Zobel, Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of California. 



22 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE COLLEGE DIVISION 

William M. Whyburn, Vice-President, Graduate Studies and Research 
Walter John Peterson, Dean, Raleigh 

ORGANIZATION 

The Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Carolina 
is composed of three divisions, one at each of the three units of the Univer- 
sity System. Each branch of the Consolidated Graduate School is admin- 
istered by a Graduate Dean who works in close association with the Vice- 
President in charge of Graduate Studies and Research. The Graduate 
Council is composed of representatives of the Administrative Boards of 
each of the three units of the Consolidated University. At State College 
the Graduate Dean is assisted in all matters of policy by an Administrative 
Board of seven members, five of whom are elected by the faculties of the 
degree-granting schools, the remaining two being appointed by the Chan- 
cellor after consultation with the Dean. 

Graduate instruction at State College is organized to provide opportunity 
and facilities for advanced study and research in the fields of Agriculture, 
Engineering, Forestry, Technological Education, and Textiles. The purpose 
of these graduate programs is to develop in advanced students a more 
adequate comprehension of the scope of knowledge in these special fields of 
learning and an understanding of the requirements and responsibilities 
essential for independent research investigations. In all of the graduate pro- 
grams emphasis is placed upon a high level of scholarship rather than upon 
the satisfaction of specific course or credit requirements. 

Facilities. — The full resources of the Consolidated University of North 
Carolina are made available to all graduate students enrolled at any one 
of the three branches of the Graduate School. Exceptional facilities for 
graduate study are provided at State College. New buildings furnish mod- 
ern well equipped laboratories for graduate study in specialized areas of 
Agriculture, Engineering, Forestry, and Textiles. One of the new buildings 
houses a nuclear reactor. Research facilities are available in the new re- 
actor building for graduate students in physics, engineering and the 
biological sciences. 

The North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and the Department 
of Engineering Research are integral parts of the College. The Staff, re- 
search facilities, equipment, and field studies of these organizations con- 
tribute in a very important way to the graduate programs of the College. 
The presence of the Institute of Statistics on the State College Campus 
makes available to graduate students unusual opportunities in this impor- 
tant phase of research study. 

The state of North Carolina, extending from the Atlantic Ocean westward 
about 500 miles to the high Appalachian Mountains, possesses an excep- 
tional range of climatic and topographic environments. The coastal plain, 
the piedmont, and the mountains provide a rich pattern of agricultural and 

23 



ial activities which offer unusual opportunities for research study 
and employment. 

State College is located in Raleigh, a city of 89,000, situated on the 
boundary separating the broad coastal plains on the east from the rolling 
terrain of the piedmont on the west, about midway between the northern 
and southern boundaries of the state. Raleigh is 29 miles from Chapel Hill, 
the location of the University of North Carolina, and 26 miles from Durham, 
the home of Duke University. The libraries and other facilities of the three 
institutions make this area one of the important centers of research op- 
portunity in the South. 

The College Library 

The N. C. State College Library has excellent holdings in materials 
essential for research study in the graduate curricula offered by the 
college. 

As of July 1, 1959 the College Library held more than 194,000 volumes 
of books and bound journals, including more than 17,000 bound documents. 
The books and journals have been selected to reflect strongly the scientific 
and technological interests of the College, and the documents represent 
a most important increment of the whole collection. They include, in addi- 
tion to the publications of the Federal government, all publications of 
the various Agricultural Experiment Stations, most of the publications 
of the Engineering Experiment and Engineering Research Stations, and 
publications of the various research stations from all over the world. 
The depository status of the College Library may be described as follows: 

1. The Library is a complete depository for all unclassified publications of 
the Federal government that are available for distribution. This in- 
cludes, of course, publications of the U.S.D.A., Geological Survey, Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards, Department of Intei'ior, etc. Since 1923, the 
year the library was designated as a depository, our document holdings 
in the fields of our special interest are almost 100% complete. 

2. The Library is a "selective" depository for the publications of the 
Carnegie Institution of Washington. The Library has excellent files of 
these valuable monographs. 

3. The Library is a depository for all unclassified and declassified publi- 
cations of the Atomic Energy Commission. 

4. The Library receives on exchange the publications of many foreign 
countries — especially publications dealing with the agriculture sciences 
and with engineering. 

The resources of the College library together with the generous assistance 
given to us by our sister institution, the University Library at Chapel 
Hill, and inter-library loan service available from other scientific libraries 
make the D. H. Hill Library of the North Carolina State College a highly 
satisfactory adjunct of the graduate program of the College. 

A reciprocal arrangement has been made with the library at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina and the Duke University Library whereby their 
facilities are available to our faculty and graduate students who may wish 
to deal with these libraries directly. 

Identification certificates may be secui'ed at the office of the director of 
the State College Library. 

24 



Research Program at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies 

North Carolina State College as a unit of the Consolidated University 
of North Carolina is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak Ridge 
Institute of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through 
this cooperative association with the Institute our graduate research pro- 
gram has at its disposal the facilities and research staff of Oak Ridge Na- 
tional Laboratory. An extensive research program is underway there on 
the physical and biological effects of radiations, uses of radioisotopes and 
many other nuclear physics and chemical processes. When master's and 
doctoral candidates have completed their resident work, it may be possible, 
by special arrangement, for them to go to Oak Ridge to do their research 
problems and prepare their theses. In addition, it is possible for the staff 
members of this university to go to Oak Ridge for varying periods, usually 
not less than three months for advanced study in their particular fields. 

Institute of Statistics 

The development of the Institute of Statistics has made an important 
contribution to the graduate program at State College. The Institute is 
organized as a part of the Consolidated University of North Carolina with 
a section at State College and a section at the University at Chapel Hill. 

By utilizing the combined strengths of the two groups in most of its 
work, the Institute draws upon the excellent background of theory and 
the experience of application found in few institutions in the world. The 
instructional program is backed by an active responsibility in consulting 
with institutional and contract research projects and by an increasing 
volume of research in statistics and methodology. 

Computing Facilities 

There are a number of high speed computing facilities available to grad- 
uate instruction and research. 

An IBM 650 electronic digital computer is located in the Institute of 
Statistics, Patterson Hall, and is available for graduate student research. 
It is also used in connection with courses and short courses in computer 
theory and operation. It is supplemented by a full complement of other 
IBM machines. 

A GEDA (Goodyear Electronic Differential Analyzer) is in use in the 
Mathematics Department's research and graduate instruction program, 
particularly in problems involving large scale linear and non-linear dif- 
ferential equations. 

Several Donner analog computers are in use on the campus in classroom 
instruction and research projects. 

The Textile School has an IBM 610 digital computer used in their re- 
search and graduate student instruction. 

A UNIVAC (Remington Rand 1105) is in operation at the University at 
Chapel Hill and is also available for faculty and graduate student research. 



25 



THE GRADUATE DEGREES 

The Graduate School of State College offers work leading to the Master 
of Science degree in the specialized branches of Agriculture, Education, 
Engineering, Forestry and Textiles; the Professional Master's degree in 
Agriculture, Agricultural Education and Forestry; and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in certain fields of Agriculture, Engineering, and For- 
estry. 

A graduate student is expected to familiarize himself with the require- 
ments for the degree for tohich he is a candidate and is held responsible for 
the fulfillment of these requirements. This applies to the last dates on 
which theses may be accepted, the dates for examinations, the proper form 
of theses, and all other matters regarding requirements for degrees. 

ADMISSION 

Admission may be to full graduate standing, provisional or in an un- 
classified status. All applications for admission to the Graduate School 
must be accompanied by official transcripts from all colleges previously 
attended. 

Full Graduate Standing. For admission in this category a student must 
have a Bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university regarded 
as standard by a regional or general accrediting agency and at least a 
B grade average in the undergraduate major. 

Provisional admission may be granted to applicants who lack under- 
graduate work, considered essential for graduate study in the major field. 
Course work, without graduate credit, will be required to make up such 
deficiencies before admission to full graduate status can be granted. 

Graduates from non-accredited institutions may be granted provisional 
admission when their academic records warrant. Additional course work 
will be required of such students when deficiencies in their previous training 
are apparent. 

Graduates from accredited institutions whose scholastic records are below 
the standards for admission to full graduate standing may be admitted 
provisionally when unavoidable extenuating circumstances affected their 
undergraduate averages or when progressive improvement in their under- 
graduate programs warrant. All such students are required to take the 
Graduate Record Examinations and to submit scores to the Graduate Office 
in support of their application. The National Teacher's Examination may 
be substituted for the Graduate Record Examination if recommended by 
the department head. Information as to the dates on which the Graduate 
Record and the National Teacher's Examinations are given may be ob- 
tained at the Graduate Office. 

Graduate students admitted on a provisional status may attain full 
graduate standing when the deficiencies responsible for their provisional 
status have been corrected. They also must have maintained a satisfactory 
academic record in all course work taken as a part of their graduate 
program. Change from provisional to full graduate standing is effected 
only on written recommendation from the department in which the student 
is seeking his degree. 

Unclassified graduate students are not candidates for graduate degrees. 

26 



They may take courses for graduate credit, but may not apply more than 10 
credits earned while in the unclassified status to any program leading to an 
advanced degree at this institution. Unclassified graduate students are ex- 
pected to meet the same admission requirements that apply to graduate 
students in full standing. 

Applications for admission to the Graduate School should be on file in the 
Graduate Office at least thirty days in advance of the registration date for 
the term in which the student wishes to enroll in the Graduate School. 

Students who apply for admission to the Graduate School without having 
allowed sufficient time for the study of completed transcripts, or prior to 
the receipt of their scores on the Graduate Record Examinations, may be 
admitted as unclassified students. When evaluation of completed transcripts 
or satisfactory performance on the Graduate Record Examinations warrant, 
such students may be transferred during the semester to full or provisional 
status. Unless transcripts or Graduate Record Examination scores are 
received within a reasonable time after admission or when evaluation of 
transcripts or scores on the Graduate Record Examinations indicate un- 
satisfactory qualifications for graduate study, no graduate credit may be 
received for course work. 

The Office of Registration must have written authorization from the 
Dean of the Graduate School before any graduate student will be given 
a permit to register. This permit will be sent to the Office of Registration 
by the Graduate Dean at the time the student is notified of his acceptance. 

A full-time graduate load is considered to be 15 credits per semester. This 
course load restriction is made so that graduate students may have time 
for reading and contemplation well beyond the limits set for satisfactory 
undergraduate work. In exceptional cases one or two additional credit hours 
may be added to the roster if necessary in order to get prerequisite work 
which is not taught in subsequent terms, provided the corresponding ad- 
justment in course load is made in the other terms. Rosters with additional 
credit hours beyond 15 should be accompanied by a special note from the 
head of the major department indicating the reasons for the additional 
work. 

Full-time employees of the College may register for one course in each 
semester. Registration for two courses will be permitted (a) when a reduc- 
tion in the service obligation of the employee releases time that may be 
devoted to graduate study or (b) when the total credits do not exceed 
four. Staff members whose service obligations are reduced in any given 
semester will be permitted a proportionate increase in graduate course 
work. 

Employees of the College having academic rank higher than that of in- 
structor may register for graduate work for credit to be transferred to 
other institutions. They may not undertake programs for graduate degrees 
in the Consolidated University of North Carolina. 

Graduate assistants on half-time appointments are permitted a maximum 
course load of 9 credits per semester unless corresponding adjustments are 
made in their service obligations during the same semester. If the appoint- 
ment is for the academic year of 9 months, half-time assistants are re- 
stricted to a maximum of 18 credit hours of work during the 9 months of 
their appointment. Half-time graduate assistants whose appointments are 

27 



for 12 months may not exceed a total of 24 credits during the 12 month 
period of their appointment. 

A member of the senior class of State College may, upon approval of the 
Dean of the Graduate School, register for courses in the 500 group for 
graduate credit to fill a roster of studies not to exceed 15 credits in any 
semester. Not more than 6 hours of graduate credit may be acquired by 
an undergraduate student. Courses listed with numbers in the 600 series are 
not open to undergraduates. 

All regularly enrolled graduate students must take a physical examina- 
tion. Preferably this should be given by the family physician on forms pro- 
vided by the College. When this is not done the examination may be taken 
at the College during registration. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for the 
examination when it is given by the College physician. 

Admission to Candidacy for Graduate Degrees 

Admission to the Graduate School does not constitute admission to can- 
didacy for a graduate degree. Application for admission to candidacy for 
graduate degrees must be submitted to the Administrative Board of the 
Graduate School. Applications of students preparing for the Master's de- 
gree may not be filed before the satisfactory completion of one full semes- 
ter of graduate study and must be presented before the end of the first 
week of the last semester in residence. Approval of the application will be 
determined by the quality of the scholastic record and on the certification 
by the major department that the student is qualified to continue advanced 
work. Admission to candidacy for the doctorate is granted upon satisfac- 
tory completion of the qualifying or preliminary examinations. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Master of Science degree is awarded at State College after comple- 
tion of a course of study in specialized fields in Agriculture, Education, 
Engineering, Forestry or Textiles; demonstration of ability to read a 
modern foreign language; completion of a satisfactory thesis and of com- 
prehensive examinations in the chosen field of study. 

In addition to complying with these requirements, the candidate for the 
Master of Science degree is expected to achieve high levels of scholar- 
ship. Graduate study is distinguished from undergraduate work by its 
emphasis upon independent research. The graduate student is more inter- 
ested in the significance of facts than in the accumulation of data. He is 
concerned with the materials of learning and the organization and inter- 
pretation of these materials. 

A graduate student's program of study is planned so as to provide a 
comprehensive view of some major field of interest and to furnish the 
training essential for successful research in this field and related areas 
of knowledge. As great a latitude is permitted in the selection of courses 
as is compatible with a well-defined major interest. The program of course 
work is selected with the object of making possible a reasonable mastery 
of the subject matter in a specialized field. Training in research is pro- 
vided to give the student familiarity with the methods, ideals, and goals 

28 



of independent investigation. Since there are many possible combinations 
of courses, the administration of graduate programs calls for personal 
supervision of each student's plan of work by a special advisory committee 
of the graduate faculty. (See page 30.) The program of course work to 
be followed by the student as a part of the requirements for the Master's 
degree and the thesis problem selected must be approved by the student's 
advisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Credits. — 1. For the master of Science degree a minimum of thirty 
semester credits is required. 

2. Not more than six of the academic credits requh'ed for a graduate 
degree will be accepted from other institutions. 

3. No graduate credit will be awarded for excess undergraduate credit 
from any other institution. 

4. All work credited toward a master's degree must be completed within 
six calendar years. 

5. No graduate credit is allowed for courses taken by correspondence. 
A maximum of 6 semester credits may be obtained in extension study in 
the field of Education provided the extension courses are taught by a 
member of the Graduate Faculty and provided the courses are given gradu- 
ate ranking by the Graduate School. Courses taken by extension are ac- 
cepted for graduate credit only when the student has been admitted to 
the graduate school and when notice of registration is filed with the 
Graduate Office. Courses taken in extension study do not reduce the resi- 
dence requirements unless they are a part of an approved program of work 
undertaken at an off-campus center approved by the Graduate School. Credit 
for extension courses reduces the amount of credit that may be trans- 
ferred from other institutions by the amount of graduate credit granted. 

Residence. — Students engaged in a course of study leading to the Master 
of Science degree are required to be in residence at the College, pursuing 
graduate work, one full academic year unless enrolled in an approved off- 
campus program of graduate study. Resident students are not permitted to 
complete the requirements for the Master of Science degree in a shorter 
period of time. Residence credit may not be transferred from another in- 
stitution. 

Residence credit is based on the number of credits carried in a given 
term. During a regular semester, residence credit is calculated in the fol- 
lowing manner: 

Semester Credits Residence Credit 

3-5 % semester 

6-8 V2 semester 

9-11 % semester 

12-15 1 semester 

Six summer schools of six weeks in residence at the College are suf- 
ficient to fullfill the residence requirement. In a six weeks' summer session 
residence credit earned is determined by the following schedule: 
Semester Credits Residence Credit 

6 V3 semester 

less than 6 ] i semester 

The thirty semester credit hour requirement for the Master's degree 
represents the minimum quantity of work acceptable. The credit hours 

29 



required of graduate students usually exceed the minimum requirements. 
Inadequate preparation and thesis research frequently make additional 
work necessary. 

Courses of Study. — The program of the student shall contain at least 
eight semester credits in courses of the GOO group, no more than six of 
which may be allowed for research study. A maximum of two hours of 
seminar is permitted. Graduate students may use not more than six semester 
hours of course work of the 400 level for credit on programs leading to 
the Master's degree. To be acceptable for graduate credit, courses bear- 
ing a 400 number must fall in other than the student's major field of 
interest. 

During the first term in residence an advisory committee of at least 
three faculty members, one representing the field of the minor, will be 
appointed by the Dean, after consultation with the head of the major 
department, for each student engaged in a program of work leading 
to the Master's degree. The advisory committee will meet with the student 
and prepare a program of course work to meet the requirements of the 
student's graduate objectives. Four copies of the program, prepared on 
forms provided for this purpose, must be approved by each member of the 
committee, by the head of the major department and the Dean of the 
Graduate School. After approval in the Graduate Office, three copies 
will be returned to the department head, one for his files, one for the chair- 
man of the advisory committee and one for the student. 

The courses taken by a graduate student shall constitute a well-rounded 
but unified plan of study. This is interpreted to mean that the program of 
research and course work shall be divided between a major and a minor 
field. While there are no inflexible rules which govern the number of 
credit hours that must constitute the major and minor, in general, it is 
expected that approximately two-thirds of the course work will fall in the 
major and one-third in the minor. The detailed course requirements for 
each graduate student program are left to the judgment of the advisory 
committee. 

Class Work. — A graduate student is expected to show greater initiative 
in exploring the possibilities of the subject matter presented in the courses 
he takes than is the undergraduate. He is also expected to recognize the 
significance of facts and to assume a responsibility for relating data to 
theoretical concepts. In preparation, attendance, and in all the routine of 
class work the graduate student is subject to the regulations observed in 
other divisions of the college. 

Grades. — A minimum grade of C must be made on all formal course 
work to obtain graduate credit. An average of B must be obtained on all 
course work taken as a part of the student's graduate program. Failure 
to maintain a B average in any term will place the student upon proba- 
tion. Any student whose academic record fails to meet the B average 
requirement for two consecutive terms will not be permitted to continue 
a graduate program without the written approval of the Dean. 

Grades in research, seminar and special problem courses are given in 
terms of S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory) in place of the symbols 
used for formal course work. 

30 



The grade Incomplete may be used in research or laboratory courses 
when circumstances beyond the control of the student have prevented 
completion of the work by the end of the academic term. An incomplete 
grade may be given only after approval by the Dean and must be con- 
verted to one of the usual symbols before the end of the next academic 
semester in which the student is in residence. 

Language Requirements. — A reading knowledge of at least one modern 
foreign language (Germanic, Romance or Slavic) is required of candidates 
for the Master of Science degree. 

The language requirement must be satisfied before a student can be ad- 
mitted to candidacy. 

Proficiency in languages is determined by the Department of Modern 
Languages on the basis of a traditional reading knowledge examination. 
Students whose language preparation is adequate may take their language 
examination by appointment at any time during the academic year. The 
Department of Modern Languages offers course work to assist graduate 
students who desire to improve their comprehension of foreign languages 
but no course work in language is required of graduate students. Graduate 
students who expect to complete the requirements for the Master of Science 
degree should confer with the Head of the Department of Modern Languages 
soon after registration to formulate plans for meeting the language re- 
quirements of this degree. 

Students whose native language is other than English may meet the 
foreign language requirement for the Master of Science degree by dem- 
onstrating a satisfactory mastery of English. Examinations in English 
are conducted by the English Department. 

Thesis. — A candidate for the Master of Science degree must prepare a 
thesis representing an original investigation. The subject of the thesis 
must be approved by the Head of the Department in which the major work 
is done and by the student's advisory committee. Three copies of the thesis 
in final form and five copies of the abstract must be filed in the Graduate 
Office at least one month before the degree is awarded. The abstract will 
be published by the College. Detailed instructions as to form and organiza- 
tion of the thesis may be obtained at the Graduate Office. 

Examinations. — All candidates for the Master of Science degree must 
pass, with a grade of A, B, or C, all formal course work specified as a part 
of the requirements for the degree. Graduate credit for research, seminar 
and special problems courses is granted when a grade of S is recorded in 
the Registration Office. In addition, the candidate must pass a compre- 
hensive oral examination that is held to satisfy the examining committee 
that the candidate possesses a reasonable mastery of knowledge in the 
major and minor fields and that this knowledge can be used with prompt- 
ness and accuracy. This examination may not be held until all other re- 
quirements except completing the course work of the last semester are 
satisfied but must be taken not later than two weeks before the end of 
the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. Application for the 
comprehensive oral examination must be filed with the Graduate Dean by 
the chairman of the advisory committee at least one week prior to the date 
on which the examination is to be held. 

The oral examination will be conducted by an examining committee 

31 



appointed by the Graduate Dean. The chairman of the examining com- 
mittee will be the chairman of the student's advisory committee. At least 
two additional members will be appointed to represent the major and minor 
fields. The comprehensive oral examination is open to all faculty members 
who care to attend but the decision as to the candidate's fitness rests 
solely with the examining committee. 

At the discretion of the examining committee, written examinations 
covering the subject matter in the major and minor fields also may be 
required of the candidate. Written examinations, when required, may not 
be held earlier than the end of the first month of the last semester in 
residence, and not later than one week before the comprehensive oral 
examination. 

The final examination for candidates for the Master's degree may not 
be held until the thesis, in complete and final form, bearing the signature 
of the chairman of the student's advisory committee, has been submitted 
to the Graduate Office. 

MASTER'S DEGREE IN A PROFESSIONAL FIELD 

This degree is offered for students who are interested in the more ad- 
vanced applications of fundamental principles to specialized fields rather 
than in the acquisition of the broader background in the advanced scientific 
studies which would fit them for careers in research. Students working 
for this degree ordinarily will terminate their graduate work at this point. 

Examples of the types of degrees that may be awarded upon the com- 
pletion of the course of study in a professional field are: 
Master of Agricultural Education 
Master of Forestry 
Master of Agricultural Engineering 

The degree is not offered in the Schools of Engineering and Textiles. 

The chief characteristic of these degrees is that the changes made in 
requirements permit, in greater measure, the satisfaction of what are 
represented as professional needs than do the requirements for the con- 
ventional Master of Science degree. The most important modification in 
the requirements is the greater emphasis upon the applied rather than 
the basic sciences. 

Language Requirements. — The candidate for a Master's degree in a pro- 
fessional field is exempt from the requirements of a reading knowledge 
of a modern foreign language. 

Thesis Requirements. — In the School of Education the thesis requirement 
for the Master's degree in each of the specialized fields may be waived by 
the department in which the degree is sought. When the thesis requirement 
is waived the student must complete the course Introduction to Educational 
Research, or departmental course in research and a problem report. A thesis 
is required for the professional degree in Agriculture and Forestry. 

Other Requirements. — The other requirements for the Master's degree 
in a professional field are the same as for the Master of Science degree. 

THE MASTER OF AGRICULTURE DEGREE 

This plan is offered for the students who are interested in advanced 
training in the broad field of agriculture but whose responsibility is not 

32 



in research. The requirements for the degree are designed to provide an 
opportunity for professional training without narrow specialization to 
those who plan to devote their lives to some phase of practical agricul- 
ture. Among the individuals interested would be agricultural extension 
workers and foreign students who are in action or educational programs. 
The proposed plan differs from the plan for the Master of Science degree 
in the following principal respects: 

1. A total of 36 semester credits is required. 

2. A minimum of four semester credits in special problems is required. 
Not more than six semester credits in special problems will be al- 
lowed. This work replaces the research thesis requirement of the 
Master of Science degree. 

3. There are no specific requirements as to courses in the 600 group. 

4. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is not required. 
In all other respects the requirements for the Master of Agriculture 

degree are the same as those for the Master of Science degree. 



33 



SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate Office or 
Department Head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student by Graduate Office or Department 
Head. 

3. Receipt of application form and transcript by Graduate Office. 

4. Application with transcript sent to Department Head for study. 

5. Department Head recommends acceptance of prospective student stating 
curriculum in which he will work and the degree sought. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic 
standards, notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate 
Office. When the student's academic record fails to meet the minimum 
scholastic standards of the Graduate School, provisional admission 
may be granted upon submission by the student of evidence of a satis- 
factory performance on the Graduate Record or National Teacher's 
Examinations. The National Teacher's Examination is accepted only 
when approved by the Department Head and the Graduate Dean. 

7. Permit to register is sent by the Graduate Office to the Registrar. 

8. Student arrives, reports to the Department Head, is assigned an ad- 
viser, and makes out a roster of courses in consultation with depart- 
mental adviser. 

9. Advisory committee of 3 or more faculty members, one of whom repre- 
sents the minor field, appointed before the end of the first semester 
of graduate study by the Graduate Office after consultation with the 
Department Head. 

10. Plan of work prepared by the advisory committee in consultation with 
the student and submitted in quadruplicate to the Graduate Office by 
the end of the first semester in residence. 

11. Plan of work approved by the Graduate Dean and three copies returned 
to the Department Head. One copy is kept in department files, one 
goes to the advisor, and one is given to the student. 

12. A thesis subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research 
submitted to the Department Head and to the student's advisory com- 
mittee. Students preparing themselves for the professional degree 
in specialized fields of Education should consult the chairman of 
their committees with reference to their problem report. 

13. Student passes language examination. Students preparing themselves 
for the master's degree in a professional field are not required to pass a 
language examination. The language requirement must be satisfied 
before admission to candidacy can be granted. 

14. Student applies for admission to candidacy for the Master's degree. 
Application must be filed before the end of the first week of the last 
semester in residence and may not be filed before the language re- 
quirement is satisfied. 

15. Application is reviewed by the head of the major department and by 
the Administrative Board and if approved the student becomes a candi- 
date for the degree. 

16. A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis is submitted to the chair- 
man of the student's committee for criticism. No thesis is required 

34 



of candidate for the master's degree in specialized fields of Education. 

17. Corrected draft of the thesis submitted to members of the student's 
advisory committee for additional suggestions and criticisms. 

18. Three copies of the thesis in final form approved by each member of 
the students advisory committee and signed by the advisor are submitted 
to the Graduate Office at least one month prior to awarding of the 
degree. 

19. Permission for student to take final examination requested of Graduate 
Office by chairman of student's advisory committee at least one week 
before the examination is to be held. Permission will not be granted 
until thesis in final and complete form has been received in the Gradu- 
ate Office. 

20. Permission granted by Graduate Dean — date is set and examining 
committee appointed. 

21. Report of the examination sent to the Graduate Office at least two 
weeks prior to the date the degree is to be awarded. 

22. Graduate Office certifies to the Registration Office and to the General 
Faculty that all requirements for the degree have been met and 
recommends the awarding of the degree. 

23. Student must be registered in term in which degree is to be awarded. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the following depart- 
ments: 

Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Animal Industry 

Botany (in the fields of physiology and ecology) 

Ceramic Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Entomology 

Experimental Statistics 

Field Crops 

Forestry 

Genetics 

Physics (in the fields of engineering physics and 

nuclear engineering) 
Plant Pathology 
Rural Sociology 
Soils 
Zoology (in the fields of ecology and wildlife biology). 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Doctor's degree symbolizes the fact that the recipient is capable of 
undertaking original research and scholarly work at the highest levels 
without supervision. Therefore, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not 

35 



granted on a basis of the successful completion of a given amount of course 
work, but rather upon the demonstration by the candidate of a compre- 
hensive knowledge and high attainments in scholarship and research in a 
specialized field of study. These attainments are determined by the quality 
of the dissertation which the candidate prepares to report the results of 
original investigations and by passing successfully a series of rigorous 
and comprehensive examinations on the special and related fields of study. 

Residence. — A minimum of six full semesters of work beyond the Bache- 
lor's degree is required for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree. Ordinarily, 
students who have the Master's degree will require two additional years of 
full time study to meet the requirements of the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
At least one of these years must be spent in continuous residence at the 
Consolidated University of North Carolina. 

The amount of credit granted for work accomplished at other institutions 
will be determined by the Dean after consultation with the student's ad- 
visory committee at the time the plan of graduate work is filed. 

All work credited toward a Doctor of Philosophy degree must be com- 
pleted within ten calendar years. 

Course of Study. — At the time of admission the student should, with the 
advice of the chairman of the department, elect a major field. During the 
first semester in residence an advisory committee of at least five members 
will be appointed by the Graduate Dean, after consultation with the De- 
partment Head, to prepare with the student a plan of graduate work. 
Four copies of the program thus outlined, signed by all members of the 
advisory committee and the department head or graduate administrator 
are referred to the Graduate Dean for approval. When approved three copies 
are returned to the Department Head, one being retained in the department 
files, a second copy is given to the chairman of the advisory committee, 
and the third copy is given to the student. The subject of the dissertation 
must appear on the plan of work, and any subsequent changes in the subject 
of the thesis or in the plan of graduate work must be reported to the 
Graduate Office for approval. 

There are no definite requirements in credit hours for the Doctor's 
degree. Emphasis is placed upon a comprehensive knowledge of a well 
defined and recognized field and related subjects. There shall be a major 
and one or two minor areas of specialization. The minor field ordinarily 
will consist of at least twenty semester credit hours. These may fall in 
an allied department or in the major department. A minor in the depart- 
ment of the major is permitted only when the department offers recognized 
divisions of study other than that designated as the major field. 

Languages. — A reading knowledge of scientific literature in two modern 
foreign languages is required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

These two languages may be a combination of Romance and Slavic, 
Romance and Germanic, or Slavic and Germanic languages. 

The language requirements must be satisfied before the qualifying 
examinations can be taken. 

Proficiency in languages is determined by the Department of Modern 
Languages on the basis of a traditional reading knowledge examination. 
Students whose language preparation is adequate may take their language 

36 



examination by appointment at any time during the academic year. The 
Department of Modern Languages offers course work to assist graduate 
students who desire to improve their comprehension of foreign languages 
but no course work in language is required of graduate students. Graduate 
students who expect to complete the requirements for the Ph.D. degree 
should confer with the Head of the Department of Modern Languages 
soon after registration to formulate plans for meeting the language re- 
quirement of this degree. 

Students whose native tongue is some language other than English 
may use English as one of the languages required for the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degree. When English is submitted in partial fulfillment of the lan- 
guage requirements, the native language may not be used to satisfy the 
language requirements. Examinations in English will be given by the 
English Department, and a statement certifying the candidate's proficiency 
in English must be filed in the Graduate Office before the qualifying 
examination may be taken. 

The Dissertation. — The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the 
candidate's original investigations in the field of his major interests. It 
must represent a contribution to knowledge adequately supported by data 
and written in a manner consistent with high standards of excellence in 
scholarship. Detailed instructions relating to the thesis may be obtained 
in the Graduate Office. 

Publication of the results obtained in the thesis investigation is expected. 
Each copy of the thesis must be accompanied by an abstract of approxi- 
mately 500 words. The abstract will be published by the College. 

The dissertation will be examined by all members of the examining 
committee and must receive their approval to be acceptable to the Graduate 
Office. 

Three copies of the dissertation in final form and bearing the signature of 
the chairman of the student's advisory committee must be presented to the 
Graduate Office not later than six weeks before the date on which the 
degree is to be awarded. 

North Carolina State College now has an agreement with University 
Microfilms, Inc. of Ann Arbor, Michigan by which all doctoral dissertations 
are microfilmed and abstracts of the dissertations are published in Disser- 
tation Abstracts. 

Examinations. — Not earlier than the end of the second year of graduate 
study and not later than the end of the third week of the academic year 
in which the degree is expected each doctoral student is required to pass 
general comprehensive examinations (known as the qualifying or prelimi- 
nary examinations). The examinations are given by an examining committee 
of graduate faculty members appointed by the Graduate Dean after con- 
sultation with the head of the department in which the student's major work 
has been taken. The examining committee usually consists of the student's 
advisory committee and a representative of the Graduate School, but may 
include other members of the Graduate Faculty. The examinations are open 
to all members of the Graduate Faculty who may care to attend. 

Authorization for the qualifying examination is requested of the Graduate 
School by the chairman of the student's advisory committee when the major 

37 



part of the student's program of course work has been completed and 
when, in the judgment of the committee, the student is prepared to devote 
the greater part of his time to the prosecution of his research study. Mem- 
bers of the examining committee will be notified of their appointment by 
the Graduate Office. Official printed forms will be supplied to the chairman 
of the examining committee for a report of the results of the examination. 

The examination consists of two parts: (1) written examinations pre- 
pared separately by each member of the examining committee and (2) an 
oral examination held before the entire examining committee. Upon re- 
ceiving authorization for holding the qualifying examination, the chairman 
of the examining committee will request examination questions from each 
member of the examining committee. Each set of questions will be given to 
the student by the chairman of the examining committee in any order that 
may seem appropriate. The questions together with the student's answers 
will be returned to the members of the committee for grading. The questions 
may cover any phase of the course work taken by the student during the 
period of his graduate study or any subject logically related and basic to 
an understanding of the subject matter of the major and minor areas of 
study. They should be designed to measure the student's mastery of these 
subject matter fields and the adequacy of his preparation for research 
investigations. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written examinations the student 
must pass an oral examination before the entire examining committee. This 
examination usually follows the written examination within a week. The 
members of the examining committee will be notified by the Graduate School 
of the time and place arranged for the oral examination. The oral examina- 
tion is designed to test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to 
specific circumstances. In the oral examination the student is expected to 
use his knowledge with accuracy and promptness and to demonstrate that 
his thinking is not limited to the facts learned in course work. 

When the examining committee consists to five members, a unanimous 
vote of approval is required for passing the preliminary examination. Ap- 
proval may be conditioned, however, upon the completion of additional work 
in some particular field to the satisfaction of the committee. In case a single 
dissenting vote is cast in a five member committee, the course of action 
to be taken will become a matter for decision by the Administrative Board. 
Upon receiving the approval of the examining committee the student is 
admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. 

A final oral examination is also required. During a normal academic year, 
an interval of at least eight months must elapse between admission to 
candidacy and the final oral examination. If summer sessions are involved, 
this interval may be interpreted to include two consecutive summer sessions 
and one academic semester. 

This examination is held after the dissertation has been completed and 
consists in a defense by the candidate of the methods used and the con- 
clusions reached in his research study. The examination is conducted by 
an examining committee. The examining committee usually consists of the 
student's advisory committee, plus a representative of the Graduate School, 
although this procedure is not always adopted. The examining committee is 

38 



appointed by the Graduate Dean after consultation with the head of the 
student's major department. 

The final oral examination may not be held until the dissertation in com- 
plete and final form, bearing the signature of the chairman of the student's 
advisory committee as evidence of committee approval has been submitted 
to the Graduate Office. 

Failure of a student to pass either the preliminary or the final exami- 
nation terminates his graduate work at this institution unless otherwise 
recommended by the examining committee. No re-examination may be 
given until at least one full semester has elapsed since the first examination. 
Only one re-examination is permitted. 

Admission to Candidacy. — A student is admitted to candidacy upon 
successfully passing the preliminary examinations. The language require- 
ments must be fulfilled before permission to take the preliminary exam- 
ination will be granted. Admission to candidacy must be obtained before 
the end of the third week in the academic year in which the degree is ex- 
pected; i.e., nearly two semesters before the degree is awarded. 

Thesis Regulations. — A booklet containing detailed instruction about 
the form of dissertation may be obtained at the Graduate Office. 

Further information about graduate work at State College may be 
secured from Walter J. Peterson, Dean of the Graduate School, N. C. State 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 

SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR THE DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate Office or 
Department Head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student by Graduate Office or Department 
Head. 

3. Receipt of application forms by Graduate Office. 

4. Application with transcript sent to Department Head for study. 

5. Department Head recommends acceptance of prospective student stat- 
ing curriculum in which he will work. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic 
standards, notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate Office. 

7. Permit to register is sent by Graduate Office to the Registrar. 

8. Student arrives, reports to the Department Head, is assigned an 
advisor, and makes out a roster of courses in consultation with depart- 
mental advisor. 

9. Advisory committee of at least five members is appointed in the first 
term of graduate study by the Graduate Dean after consultation with 
the Department Head. 

10. Plan of work prepared by the advisory committee in consultation with 
the student and submitted in quadruplicate to the Graduate Office by 
the end of the first semester in residence. 

11. Plan of work approved by the Graduate Dean and three copies returned 
to the Department Head. One copy is kept in department files, one 
goes to the advisor, and one is given to the student. 



12. A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed re- 
search submitted to the Department Head and the student's advisory 
committee. 

13. Student passes language examinations. 

14. The chairman of the student's advisory committee requests permission 
to hold the qualifying examination. This must be done not earlier than 
the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than 8 months 
before the date on which the degree is to be awarded. 

15. Permission to take qualifying examination granted by Graduate Dean 
if the student's record is in order. A date is set and examining com- 
mittee appointed. The examination consists of two parts — a written 
and an oral. 

16. A report of the examination is sent to the Graduate Office. If favorable, 
the student is admitted to candidacy. 

17. A copy of a preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the 
chairman of the student's committee for criticism. 

18. Corrected draft of the dissertation submitted to members of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee for additional suggestions and criticisms. 

19. Three copies of the dissertation in final form approved by each mem- 
ber of the students advisory committee and signed by the advisor 
are submitted to the Graduate Office at least six week prior to atvard- 
ing of the degree. 

20. Eight months after admission to candidacy or later, permission for the 
candidate to take the final oral examination is requested of the Grad- 
uate School by the chairman of the candidate's advisory committee. 
Requests should be filed at least one week before the date of the 
examination. 

21. Permission granted by Graduate Dean if the student's record is in 
order. A date is set and examining committee appointed. 

22. Report of the examination sent to the Graduate Office at least one 
week prior to the date on which the degree is to be awarded. 

23. Graduate Office certifies to the Registration Office and to the General 
Faculty that all requirements for the degree have been met and rec- 
ommends the awarding of the degree. 

24. Student must be registered in the term in which the degree is to be 
awarded. 



40 



TUITION AND FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

FIRST SEMESTER 



Course Load 

7 cr. hrs. or more 
6 cr. hrs. or less 
3 cr. hrs. or less 



Course Load 

7 cr. hrs. or more 
6 cr. hrs. or less 
3 cr. hrs. or less 



In-State Students 
Fees* Tuition Total 

$71.00 $75.00 $146.00 
54.50 37.50 92.00 
46.25 18.75 65.00 

SECOND SEMESTER 

In-State Students 
Fees* Tuition Total 

$65.00 $75.00 $140.00 
48.50 37.50 86.00 
40.25 18.75 59.00 



Out-of-State Students 
Fees* Tuition Total 

$71.00 $250.00 $321.00 
54.50 125.00 179.50 
46.25 62.50 108.75 



Out-of-State Students 
Fees* Tuition Total 

$65.00 $250.00 $315.00 
48.50 125.00 173.50 
40.25 62.50 102.75 



*Tlie Athletic Fee of $10 in the first semester and ?5 in the second semester will be re- 
funded if the student presents his identification card to the business office within 10 days 
after the date of registration. 

Students who are not living in the campus area and whose professional 
responsibilities prevent their participation in the activities supported by 
the non-academic fees will be exempt from payment of non-academic fees. 

Assistantships: Graduate students who have received appointments as 
teaching or research assistants will be charged, during the period of their 
employment, the tuition rates paid by residents of North Carolina. 

Thesis Preparation: Graduate students who have completed all course 
work and residence requirements and who are in residence for the purpose 
of writing a thesis or dissertation may register for "thesis preparation." The 
tuition charge for this registration is $15. Students registering for thesis 
preparation will pay all non-academic fees (athletic fees are optional.) 

Graduate students, not in residence, who have completed all requirements 
for the degree sought including the thesis and final examination will be 
required to register for "Degree Only" in the term in which the degree is 
awarded. The charge for this registration will be $10. 

Audits: Students wishing to visit classes without participation in class 
discussions, quizzes or examinations must register for this privilege as 
auditors. Visiting classes without registration is not permitted. Graduate 
students may register for one course as audit in any semester without 
charge when the audit forms a part of course work for which tuition charges 
are made. Audits in subjects in which the student has had no previous expe- 
rience will be evaluated at full credit value in determining course loads. 
Audits taken as repetition of work previously accomplished are considered 
at one half their credit value in calculating course loads. With the single 
exception of foreign language audits, all audit registrations must fall 
within the maximum permissible course loads. Audits are not permitted 
students registering for thesis preparation. 

While audit registrations are evaluated for purposes of determining 
permissive course loads in terms of the above regulations by the Graduate 
Office, the Business Office considers all audits, excepting the one permitted 
free of charge, in terms of full credit value in calculating the fees for 
graduate students. 



41 



Diploma Fee: A diploma fee of $12 is charged all students receiving a 
master's degree and a fee of $17 is charged all students who receive a 
doctorate. A fee of $21 is charged all doctoral candidates for microfilming 
their dissertations. 

All tuition charges and fees are subject to change without notice. 

FEES FOR SUMMER SCHOOL 

Registration Fee $11.00 

Tuition (In-State Students per credit hour) 7.50 

Tuition (Out-of-State Students per credit hour) 15.00 

Audits (per course) 7.50 

In order to draw a clear line between in-state and out-of-state students, 
the Administration has ruled that all students whose parents have not been 
domiciled in North Carolina for more than six months immediately preced- 
ing the day of their first enrollment in the institution shall be termed out-of- 
state students, with the following exceptions: 

(1) Students twenty-one years of age at the time of their first matricu- 
lation who have resided in North Carolina for more than one year 
preceding the day of their first enrollment; 

(2) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government stationed 
in the State of North Carolina; and 

(3) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government who are 
employed outside of the State, but who through law are permitted 
to retain their North Carolina citizenship. 

Students cannot claim a change in their resident status after matricu- 
lating. Students furnishing incomplete or incorrect information in order to 
obtain the special State-resident status shall be liable for dishonorable dis- 
missal. 

Graduate students employed by the College or the Experiment Station 
on a part-time basis are not permitted to register for a full-time load of 
course work. The Veterans Administration will classify such students 
as full-time students when it is officially certified by the Dean of the 
Graduate School that the student is engaged in a full-time program of 
professional work. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate Fellowships are funds offered to graduate students to assist 
in the support of programs of advanced study. Holders of fellowships have 
no service obligations to the College and may devote full time to the prose- 
cution of their graduate programs. 

Some of the agencies sponsoring fellowships at North Carolina State 
College are: The Celanese Corporation, DuPont Company, Eastman Kodak 
Company, Edward Orton, Jr. Ceramic Foundation, General Foods Cor- 
poration, Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Mortex Chemical Products, N. C. 
Grange (E. G. Moss Fellowship), Sperry Gyroscope Company, Union Car- 
bide Corporation and Westinghouse. 

Information relative to stipends, areas of research study supported by 

42 



specific fellowships and application forms may be obtained from the 
Graduate School or from the heads of the appropriate departments. 

Graduate Assistantships are granted to selected students who devote 
some part of their time to service duties for the College. Teaching assist- 
antships carry a stipend of $2,400 for the academic year and permit the 
holder to enroll for sixty per cent of a full course load. The stipends for 
research assistantships range from $2,000 to $2,400 for a 12 months' ap- 
pointment. The college offers 250 assistantships which require a service ob- 
ligation in either teaching or research. Some of these are supported by funds 
granted by the following agencies: the American Potash Institute, the 
Atomic Energy Commission, the Chilean Nitrate Education Bureau, Inc., 
Hercules Powder Company, the Lilliston Implement Company, the Lilly 
Company, the McLean Trucking Company, the North Carolina Department 
of Motor Vehicles, the North Carolina State Optometric Society, the Office 
of Naval Research, the Pacific Coast Borax Company, the Ralston-Purina 
Company, the Tennessee Corporation, the Solvay Process Division of the 
Allied Chemical Company, and the Union Carbide Chemicals Company. 

Residence Facilities 

Dormitory facilties are provided on the campus for unmarried graduate 
students. The rental charge for double rooms is $85 per semester. A limited 
number of apartments are provided for married graduate students. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The courses described on the following pages are planned for the academic 
years, 1960-61 and 1961-62 unless otherwise indicated. Specific courses may 
not be offered, however, if registration for the course is too low or if 
faculty or facilities become unavailable. 

Courses for which graduate credit may be received are numbered in three 
categories. Courses with a number in the 400 series carry no graduate 
credit when they fall in the student's major field of interest. Graduate 
credit will be allowed for no more than 6 semester hours at the 400 level 
in the student's minor area of study. 

Courses bearing a number in the 500 series are open to both seniors and 
graduate students. All courses in this series carry full graduate credit. 

Courses given a 600 series number are open only to graduate students. 

AGRICULTURE 

AG 401. Principles and Methods of Extension Education 0-3 

A study of the background, development, and operation of the Agricultural Extension 
Service. Consideration is given to major events leading to the establishment of Agricultural 
Extension, its objectives, organization, and philosophy. Major emphasis is placed upon the 
principles underlying Extension education together with methods of program building and 
teaching. Mr. Sloan 



43 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Charles Edwin Bishop, Head, H. Brooks James, Richard 
Adams King, James Gray Maddox, Walter Henry Pierce, George 
Stanford Tolley. 
Associate Professors: Arthur James Coutu, William Ray Henry, Wil- 
liam Douglas Toussaint, James Claude Williamson, Jr. 

The Department of Agricultural Economics offers programs of study 
leading to the Master of Agricultural Economics, the Master of Science and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Special emphasis is placed on the eco- 
nomics of agricultural production and marketing, analysis of programs and 
policies affecting agriculture and statistical techniques used in solving 
economic problems of the agricultural industry. The curriculum includes 
courses in advanced economic theory with special adaptation to agricultural 
problems including the use of econometric and linear programming tech- 
niques. Business management analysis, operations analysis and program- 
ming of firm and industry decisions are emphasized. Special attention is 
given to public policies influencing regional and national agricultural ad- 
justments. 

Collateral fields of study include statistics, rural sociology, history and 
political science, general economics, agricultural education and various tech- 
nical departments of the School of Agriculture. 

As a part of their advanced training, students are required to prepare 
a thesis dealing with a recognized problem in agriculture. This part of the 
program affords an opportunity to learn how to apply theory and analytical 
techniques in the solution of agricultural problems. 

The rapid growth and development of industry and agriculture in North 
Carolina and throughout the South have resulted in an increased demand 
for well-trained workers throughout the region. This demand far exceeds 
the number of qualified workers available to perform the many duties as- 
sociated with the complex and technical problems of a developing economy. 
Many graduates of the Department of Agricultural Economics are em- 
ployed in various agencies of the Federal and State governments engaged 
in research and educational work. Others are engaged in professional work 
with commercial organizations dealing in agricultural credit and the pro- 
duction and marketing of agricultural products. 

The Department is located on the second floor of Patterson Hall. It has 
a modern and well equipped departmental library, including all the major 
professional journals and USDA publications. Experiment Station publica- 
tions from other institutions throughout the United States are kept on 
file. In addition to modern computational and reproduction equipment avail- 
able in the Department, an IBM 650 digital computer and a Rand 1105 
computer are available to the Department. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

AGC 413. Farm Appraisal and Finance 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 303. 

The principles of farm appraisal and practical methods used in determining the value of 
farms of various types and sizes; credit financing in agriculture, including (1) types, 
sources, and cost of credit. (2) repayment plans, and (3) methods of determining when 
and how credit can be used effectively by farmers; special problems associated with agri- 
cultural credit. Staff 

44 



AGC 431. Agricultural Price Analysis 3-9 

Prerequisite: AGC 212. 

This course involves an examination of the behavior of agricultural prices as related to 
decision-making of economic units. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of price infor- 
mation in relation to income, consumption and production of farm products. Consideration 
is given to marketing practices which influence rrice formation in the exchange of agricul- 
tural products. Methods of agricultural price analysis, including construction and use of 
index numbers, and measures of various types of price movements are studied. 

Messrs. Pierce and Hoover 

Courses for Graduate Students and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGC 501. (EC 501). Intermediate Economic Theory 3 or 3 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and of market be- 
havior, including demand, costs and production, pricing under competitive 
conditions, and pricing under monopoly and other imperfectly competitive 
conditions. 

Staff 

AGC 512. Economic Analysis of Agricultural Factor Markets 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 212. 

This course is oriented to the relative significance of land, labor and 
capital as factors of production in a modern agricultural economy, includ- 
ing major changes in the respective roles of these factors of production in 
recent years. An examination is made of the changes in characteristics of 
the supply and demand for these factors. The structure and efficiency of 
markets for these factors, including relevance of the institutional and 
attitudinal setting in each type of market, and nature of the demand-supply 
equilibration will be investigated. Public policies as they affect efficiency 
of the factor markets and other goals relating to the use of the basic fac- 
tors of production in agriculture also will be considered. Mr. Tolley 

AGC 521. Agricultural Market Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 311, or equivalent. 

A study of marketing firms as producers of marketing services and 
their role in the pricing process; the influence of government policies on 
the behavior of marketing firms; methods for increasing the efficiency 
of marketing agricultural products. Mr. King 

AGC 523. Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 303, or equivalent. 

The application of economic principles in the solution of production prob- 
lems on typical farms in the state; methods and techniques of economic 
analysis of the farm business; application of research findings to produc- 
tion decisions; development of area agricultural programs. 

Mr. Coutu 

AGC 533. Agricultural Policy 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 212. 

A review of the agricultural policy and action programs of the Fed- 
eral Government in their economic and political setting; analysis of ob- 
jectives, principal means, and observable results under short-term and 
long-term veiwpoints, and under the criteria of resource use and income 
distribution within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of 
the economy; appraisal of alternative policy proposals; the effects of com- 
modity support programs on domestic and foreign consumption, and some 

45 



of the international aspects of United States agricultural policy; the at- 
tempts at world market regulations, and the role of international organi- 
zations, agreements, and programs. Mr. Williamson 

AGC 551. Agricultural Production Economics 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 212. 

An economic analysis of agricultural production, including: production 
functions, cost functions, programming and decision-making principles; 
and the applications of these principles to farm and regional resource 
allocation, and to the distribution of income to and within agriculture. 

Mr. Toussaint 

AGC 552. Consumption, Distribution and Prices in Agriculture 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 212. 

Basis for family decisions concerning consumption of goods and services 
and supply of productive factors; forces determining prices and incomes; 
interrelationships between economic decisions of the household and the 
farm. Mr. Henry 

AGC 561. Seminar in Contemporary Economic Problems in Agriculture 

Max. 6 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

Analysis of economic problems of current interest in agriculture. Credit 
for this course will involve a scientific appraisal of a selected problem and 
alternative solutions. Staff 

Courses for Graduate Students Only 

AGC 602. Monetary and Fiscal Policies in Relation to Agriculture 0-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: AGC 501, or equivalent. 

The essentials of monetary theory necessary in interpreting and evalu- 
ating monetary and fiscal operations and policies as to their effect upon 
income, employment, and price level; the monetary and fiscal structure, 
and the mechanics of monetary and fiscal operations in the United States; 
and the relation of monetary and fiscal policies to agricultural income 
and prices. Messrs. Tolley and Williamson 

AGC 612. International Trade in Relation to Agriculture 0-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: AGC 602 and 641. 

The principles of international and interregional trade; structures of 
trade relationships between countries engaged in the import or export of 
agricultural products; attempts at stabilizing trade and financial trans- 
actions. Mr. Tolley 

AGC 621. Research in Agricultural Economics Credits by 

arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Agricultural Economics, and con- 
sent of Graduate Advisory Committee. 

A consideration of research methods and procedures employed in the 
field of agricultural economics, including qualitative and quantitative 
analysis, inductive and deductive methods of research procedure, selection 
of projects, planning, and execution of the research project. Staff 

46 



AGC 631. Economic and Social Foundations of Agricultural Policy 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 501, or equivalent. 

The study of logical and empirical problems of inquiry into public 
policies and programs that affect agriculture; analysis of policy-making 
processes, interdependencies among economic, political and social ob- 
jectives and action; the study of forces which shape economic institutions 
and goals and of the logic, beliefs and values on which policies and pro- 
grams that affect agriculture are founded. Mr. Lindsey 

AGC 632. Welfare Effects of Agricultural Policies and Programs 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 642. 

Description of the conditions defining optimal resource allocation; appli- 
cation of the conditions for maximum welfare in appraisal of economic 
policies and programs affecting resource allocation, income distribution, 
and economic development of agriculture. Mr. Bishop 

AGC 641. Economics of Production, Supply and Market Interdependency 

3-3 

Prerequisite or corequisite: AGC 501, or equivalent. 

An advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into: producer 
behavior and choice among combinations of factors and kinds and quanti- 
ties of output; aggregative consequences of individuals' and firms' decisions 
in terms of product supply and factor demand; factor markets and in- 
come distribution; general interdependency among economic variables. 

Messrs. Seagraves and Williamson 

AGC 642. Economics of Consumption, Demand, and Market Interdepend- 
ency 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 641 and ST 513 or equivalent. 

An advanced study in the theory of, and research related to, household 
behavior; aggregative consequences of household decisions concerning fac- 
tor supply and product demand; pricing and income distribution; economic 
equilibrium. Mr. King 

AGC 651. (ST 651) Econometric Methods I 0-3 

Prerequisites: St 514, ST 521, and AGC 642. 

Decision-making under uncertainty; stochastic elements in economic the- 
ories; problems of model construction; special techniques for analyzing 
simultaneous economic relations. Graduate Staff 

AGC 652. (ST 652) Econometric Methods II 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 522, and AGC 641. 

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of significance as applied to eco- 
nomic data; empirical sampling methods; non-parametric methods; se- 
quential testing; extension of least squares methods to research in eco- 
nomics; production surfaces; special topics in variance components and 
mixed models; use of experimental designs in economic research; elements 
of multivariates analysis; techniques for analysis of time series. 

Graduate Staff 

AGC 671. Analysis of Economic Development in Agriculture 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 641. 

47 



A theoretical and empirical study of the processes of economic growth; 
the problems of under developed countries; the role of agriculture in a 
developing economy; an examination of policies and programs needed for 
effective economic development. Mr. Maddox 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

See Education. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: George Wallace Giles, Head, Francis Jefferson Hassler, 

In Charge, Agric. Engr. Graduate Studies, David S. Weaver 
Associate Professors: Henry Dittimus Bowen, William Eldon Splinter, 
Jan Van Schilfgaarde 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers advanced study 
leading to the Ph.D. degree in any one of five fields of specialization: Power 
and Machinery, Rural Structures, Soil and Water Conservation, Rural 
Electrification, or Agricultural Processing. 

The Master of Science program in Agricultural Engineering provides 
a broad background in science and engineering through advanced study in 
Mathematics and Physics. It offers training in the theoretical and in- 
strumental aspects of engineering research and development as prepara- 
tion for teaching and research positions with State and Federal institutions 
and industry. 

For those individuals interested primarily in existing technologies, a 
program of study for the Master of Agricultural Engineering degree 
permits selections from a variety of advanced application courses. This 
program provides training appropriate for those engaged in the dissemina- 
tion of information either as extension workers with public institutions 
or sales and service representatives for industry, but it is not intended 
as preliminary study to the Ph.D. degree. 

Extensive research programs, in the mechanization of cotton, peanuts 
and tobacco, in the curing and drying of forage crops, peanuts and tobacco 
as well as in irrigation and land drainage and in other subjects under way 
in the Department offer unusual opportunities for graduate student re- 
search. The Department maintains a complete research shop manned by 
competent mechanics available to graduate students. 

Admission to full graduate standing requires a Bachelor's degree in 
Agricultural Engineering from an accredited curriculum or its equivalent. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

AGE 401. Farm Shop Organization and Management 3-3 

Prerequisites: AGE 201 and 202. 

The use and care of power tools: planning of school shops and laboratories; salection of 
tools, materials, and equipment ; shop management ; and methods of presenting the subject 
matter. Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 411. Farm Power and Machinery 11B 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGE 211. 

This course is designed to ra'ovide students in Mechanized Agriculture with a knowledge 
Of the operations of manufacturing and distributing organizations of farm machinery and 
their places in those organizations. 

48 




Facilities for investigation of biophysical relationships pertinent to the engi- 
neering of agricultural productions. 




High-speed photography for dynamic analysis of machine components. 



Included is a practical course in farm tractors and engines with emphasis on familiarizing 
the student with component parts — their application, operation, and maintenance, as well as 
with the selection of these units from the standpoint of power, performance, and ratings. 

Messrs. Fore, Greene 

AGE 451. Curing and Drying of Farm Crops. 2-0 

Prerequisite: ME 301. 

Physical properties of air, fuels, and crop products as applied to the design of systems for 
the removal of moisture from crops. Problems involved in handling and storage in conjunc- 
tion with driers. Staff 

AGE 452. Senior Seminar 1 credit per semester 

Students will prepare talks in their particular fields of interest, presenting them to the 
group. Also, two or three field trips to selected points of educational opportunities will be 
made during the second semester. Maximum of two credits allowed. Mr. Giles and Staff 

AGE 462. Farm Power and Machinery HA 4-8 

Prerequisites: AGE 211, EM 321 (Strength of Materials) 

A study of the basic principles underlying the functional elements of farm machinery 
including analysis of operation, functions of various components, basic studies of processes, 
and the service adjustment and operation of current farm equipment. The course also in- 
cludes a fundamental study of internal combustion engines and power trains to the various 
outlets ; basic designs and applications of farm tractors including hitches, power lifts, and 
other integral parts. Mr. Bowen 

AGE 481. Farm Structures 0-3 

Prerequisites: AGE 451 and EM 321. 

Space and grouping arrangements, material use, and construction techniques to gain 
optimum efficiency, use and satisfaction from buildings on the farm. The design of walls 
and wall coverings to impair the transfer of heat and moisture. The design of building 
elements and their connections to withstand their imposed loads. Staff 

AGE 491. Rural Electrification 4-0 

Prerequisite: EE 320 (Elements of Electrical Engr.) 

A study of the history and development of rural electrification, rates and costs of serving 
the farm with electricity; farm wiring and lighting; electric motors; water systems; feed 
grinding and other applications of electricity to farming. Also included for study are mate- 
rials and design for rural distribution lines; switches and controls; hent and refrigeration; 
poultry and dairy equipment : and other applicable uses of electricity in farm processes. 

Mr. Weaver 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AGE 551 Special Problems Credits by Arrangements 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing in Ag. Engr. 

Each student will select a subject on which he will do research and 

write a technical report on his results. He may choose a subject pertaining 

to his particular interest in any area of study in Agricultural Engineering, 

Mr. Giles and Staff 

AGE 552. Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing 1-0 

Prerequisite: EE 320, MA 401. 

The functions of resistor, capacitor and inductor are described on the 
theories of electron distribution and displacement. These circuit com- 
ponents plus thermionic tubes are combined analytically to provide basic 
circuits for rectification, amplification and oscillation. The principles of 
various primary sensing elements are related to their use as transducers. 
A study of representative equipment for indicating, recording and con- 
trolling process variables concludes this course. Mr. Hassler. 



49 



Courses for Graduates Only 

AGE 651. Research in Agricultural Engineering 

Credits by Arrangement 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Agricultural Engineering. 
A maximum of six credits is allowed toward a Masters degree; no limita- 
tion on credits for Doctorate program. 

Performance of a particular investigation of concern to Agricultural 
Engineering. The study will begin with the selection of a problem and 
culminate with the presentation of a thesis. Graduate Staff 

AGE 652. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed. 

Elaboration of the subject areas, techniques and methods peculiar to 
professional interest through presentations of personal and published 
works; opportunity for students to present and defend, critically, ideas, 
concepts and inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solutions and 
analogies between problems in Agricultural Engineering and other tech- 
nologies, and to present the relationship of Agricultural Engineering to 
the socioeconomic enterprise. Mr. Hassler 

AGE 654. Agricultural Process Engineering 3-3 

Prerequisites: AGE 451, PY 401, MA 511. 

Generalized classical thermodynamics is extended by Onsager's rela- 
tions to provide a theoretical basis for analyzing the energetics of systems 
that include life processes. Mr. Hassler 

AGE 661. Analysis of Function and Design of Farm Machinery 3-3 

Prerequisites: AGE 462; MA 401; Statistics, PY 401. 

Methods and tools used in determining the functional requirements of 
machine components; writing of machine specifications in terms of funda- 
mental parameters; introduction of the principles of descriminate and in- 
descriminate mechanical selection of agricultural products with emphasis 
on the theory of servo-systems. Mr. Bowen 

AGE 671. Theory of Drainage, Irrigation and Erosion Control 4-4 

Prerequisites: AGE 371; EM 430; MA 401. 

Emphasis is placed on the physical and mathematical aspects of probems 
in conservation engineering and an attempt is made to rationalize proce- 
dures which have often come about through experience rather than through 
analytical considerations. Examples are presented of cases where such an 
analytical approach has already improved, or shows promise of improving, 
design criteria and procedures. Mr. Van Schilfgaarde 

AGE 681. Analysis of Function and Design of Farm Buildings 4-4 

Prerequisites: AGE 481; PY 402. 

A study of the functional requirements of farm structures with respect 
to man, animals, and crops and development of the means for providing 
structures which fulfill the functional requirements. Application of the 



50 



science and art of engineering in the solution of environmental problems. 
Advanced planning in the integration of structural and environmental de- 
sign. Staff 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY 

See Departments of Field Crops and Soils 



DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: George Hyatt, Jk., Head, Elliott Roy Barrick, Edward Guy 
Batte, Thomas Nelson Blumer, Dean W. Colvard, John Lincoln 
Etchells, James Edward Legates, Gennard Matrone, John Clark 
Osborne, William Milner Roberts, Marvin Luther Speck, Hamil- 
ton Arlo Stewart, Walter E. Thomas, George Herman Wise. 

Professor Emeritus: Francis Webber Sherwood. 

Associate Professors: Leonard William Aurand, Thomas A. Bell, James 
Giacomo Lecce, W. Ray Murley, Frank Houston Smith, Samuel B. 
Tove, Lester Curtiss Ulberg, Frederick Gail Warren. 

Assistant Professors: Albert J. Clawson, E. U. Dillard, Lemuel Goode, 
John Joseph McNeill, Richard Douglas Mochrie, Harold Arch 
Ramsey, W. W. G. Smart, Jr., Milton B. Wise. 

The Department of Animal Industry offers the Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Anmial Industry and in Dairy Manufactur- 
ing. The degrees in Animal Industry provide for major programs of work 
in the fields of animal breeding, animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, 
animal nutrition, and animal diseases. 

Students majoring in Animal Husbandry may select options in meat 
preservation and processing, rumen physiology, meat animal nutrition, and 
other phases of Animal Husbandry. 

Dairy Husbandry majors have options in dairy cattle nutrition, physiol- 
ogy of lactation, rumen physiology and other phases of dairying. 

For Animal Nutrition majors, specialized work is offered in mineral 
metabolism, intermediary metabolism, vitamins, rumen microbiology, and 
other fundamental phases of Animal Nutrition involving either laboratory 
animals or livestock. 

Students with majors in Animal Diseases are offered specialized work in 
pathology, parasitology, veterinary bacteriology and virology, and other 
phases of animal diseases. 

Students in Animal Breeding may major in physiology of reproduction 
and quantitative animal genetics. 

Degrees in Dairy Manufacturing provide for programs of work in dairy 
chemistry, dairy bacteriology, dairy products and dairy plant management. 

In cooperation with other departments, such as Poultry, Statistics, Field 
Crops, Soils, and Chemistry, specialized subject matter groups have been 
developed to direct graduate work in fields such as Animal Genetics and 
fundamental phases of Animal Nutrition. Strong supporting departments 

51 



in Statistics, Chemistry and the Biological Sciences help provide the oppor- 
tunities for a broad and thorough graduate training. 

Facilities — The Department operates approximately 2,000 acres of land 
in order that animals of various types and breeds may be available for 
research. In addition, branch stations are located in all major geographic 
areas of the state so that the research program may be applied to the 
conditions existing throughout the state. The Animal Industry Research 
Center, which is located adjacent to the campus, serves as an intermediary 
between the farms and the laboratories on the campus. At this Research 
Center, digestion trials, animal disease research and many phases of the 
physiology and nutrition programs are conducted. In addition, a physiology 
laboratory and bull barn, with stalls for 20 bulls and with two temperature 
control chambers, is used for research in physiology of reproduction and 
dairy cattle breeding. 

The Department of Animal Industry, with the exception of the Veterinary 
Section, is housed in Polk Hall, a three story building located near the cen- 
ter of the campus. The dairy and the meat processing plants and labora- 
tories, as well as research laboratories for animal nutrition, radioactive iso- 
tope studies, animal physiology, animal breeding, dairy bacteriology, and 
dairy chemistry are located in this building. Other facilities include class- 
rooms, a scientific journal reading room, and offices for the various teach- 
ing, research, and extension staff members. 

The Veterinary Section is located in a new and modern animal disease 
laboratory building, which provides excellent facilities for research and 
teaching in the animal disease field. Included are large animal isolation 
units for work in the field of veterinary bacteriology and virology, par- 
asitology, physiology, and bacteriology research laboratories and a diagnos- 
tic laboratory and necropsy room. 

Every effort is made to provide an opportunity for the graduate student 
to explore the fundamental principles of livestock production and of pro- 
duct processing. The graduate student roster is composed of men and 
women from many states and several countries. The staff is composed of 
men who received their training at various institutions. 

The staff and the physical facilities in various sections are adequate to 
provide leadership and training for an enrollment of approximately 50 
graduate students. 

Opportunities — 

Those receiving advanced degrees have found employment in other educa- 
tional and research institutions, in dairy manufacturing organizations, in 
meat processing industries, in feed manufacturing businesses and in other 
fields. In the past the demand for well-trained personnel has exceeded the 
number that has been available. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

AI 401. Beef Cattle Production 3 or S 

Prerequisite: AI 202. 

Fundamental principles of the production of beef; selection, feeding and management of 
breeding herds and feeder cattle. 

52 



AI 402. Sheep Production 0-3 

Prerequisite: AI 202. 

Study of the factors involved in the feeding, breeding, management and marketing of 
larnb, mutton and wool. Mr. Goode 

AI 403. Pork Production 3 or 3 

Study of production, management and marketing practices involved in the successful 
production of swine. Mr. Clawson 

AI 404. Dairy Farm Problems 0-3 

Prerequisite : AI 201. 

Advanced study of practical dairy farm management including farm records, farm build- 
ings, sanitation, roughage utilization and herd culling. Mr. Murley 

AI 406. Animal Industry Seminar 0-1 

Review and discussion of special topics and the current literature pertaining to all phases 
of Animal Production. Mr. Hyatt 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AI 501. Physiology of Domestic Animals 4-0 

Prerequisite: ZO 301. 
A course in advanced physiology of domestic mammals with special ref- 
erence to farm animals. Messrs. Ulberg, Thomas, and Wise 

AI 502. Reproduction and Lactation 0-4 

Prerequisite: ZO 301. 

Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive organs and mammary 
gland with detailed coverage of physiological processes involved and fac- 
tors controlling and influencing them. Specific applications to farm animals 
including artificial insemination. Messrs. Mochrie, and Ulberg 

AI 503. (GN 503). Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411. 

Traits of economic importance in livestock production, and their mode 
of inheritance. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between traits. The 
place of selection, inbreeding and cross breeding in a program of animal 
improvement. Mr. Robison 

AI 505. Diseases of Farm Animals 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 101, CH 203; BO 421 desired. 

The pathology of bacterial, viral, parasitic, nutritional, thermal and 
mechanical disease processes. Mr. Osborne 

AI 507. Topical Problems in Animal Industry Max. 6 

Special problems may be selected or assigned in various phases of Ani- 
mal Industry. A maximum of six credits is allowed. Staff 

AI 513. Needs and Utilization of Nutrients by Livestock 0-3 

Prerequisite: AI 312 or equivalent. 

Measurement of nutrient needs of livestock and the nutrient values of 
feeds. Nutritive requirements for productive functions. Mr. Wise 

Courses for Graduates Only 

AI 600. Research in Animal Industry Credits by arrangement 

A maximum of six hours is allowed toward the Master's degree; no 
limitation on credits in Doctorate programs. Graduate Staff 



AI 601. Seminar in Animal Nutrition 1-1 

Prerequisite: Permission of seminar leaders. 

Orientation in philosophy of research, organization for research and 

general research methodology. Graduate Staff 

AI 602. (GN 602). Population Genetics in Animal Improvement 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 512, GN 512. 

A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its 
effects, and alternative breeding plans. Mr. Legates 

AI 603. Animal Nutrition: Mineral Metabolism 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 551. 

Role of minerals in the nutrition of animal with emphasis on available 
knowledge, a digest of progress already made and directions in which in- 
vestigations need to be extended. Mr. Matrone 

AI 614. (BO 611) Physiology of Microorganisms. 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 412, CH 551. 

A study of the physical structure and chemical composition of micro- 
organisms; the influence of physical and chemical agents on growth and 
reproduction; the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. 

Mr. McNeill 

AI 621. (CH 621) Enzymes and Intermediary Metabolism 4-0 

Prerequisites: CH 551 and permission of instructor. 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action; intermediary 
metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, fatty acids, vitamins, and porphyrins; 
metabolic energy relationships. Mr. Tove 

AI 622. (CH 622 and ST 622) Principles of Biological Assays 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 551, ST 512. 

Techniques and designs of biological assays. The interrelationship of 
logical principles design and analysis is emphasized. 

Messrs. Carter and Tove 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Herbert T. Scofield, Head, Ernest A. Ball, Harold J. Evans, 

Larry A. Whitford 
Professor Emeritus: Bertram W. Wells. 
Associate Professor: Ernest O. Beal. 
Assistant Professors: Arthur W. Cooper, James W. Hardin, Heinz Selt- 

mann, James R. Troyer. 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Science degree in 
the fields of plant physiology, ecology, anatomy, morphology, bacteriology 
and systematic botany. Graduate work in preparation for the Doctorate 
is offered in the fields of plant physiology, morphology, ecology and sys- 
tematic botany. 

The Department of Botany and Bacteriology is provided with physical 
facilities and equipment adequate for teaching and research in all phases 

54 



of its program. Of special note are the laboratory and greenhouse facilities 
for research in plant physiology, particularly in mineral nutrition, as well 
as the rapidly growing Herbarium which supports study in systematics 
and ecology. Recently acquired constant temperature growth chambers 
enhance research in all phases of experimental plant science. 

Graduate students terminating their work at the Masters level have a 
somewhat limited opportunity as professional botanists. State and Fed- 
eral employment is available as well as teaching positions in small colleges 
and secondary schools. Those achieving the Ph.D. degree, however, will 
find opportunities for teaching positions in colleges and universities, for 
research positions in federal and state Experiment Stations, and for re- 
search and development work in botanical fields with private industrial or 
research institutions. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

BO 403. Systematic Botany 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 103. 

A systematic survey of vascular plants emphasizing field identification, terminology and 
general evolutionary relationships. Mr. Beal 

BO 407. Dairy Bacteriology 
(see DM 407). 

BO 410. Plant Histology and Microtechnique 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 103, a course in organic chemistry. 

Studies of the principal tissues of Angiosperms in terms of the theory and practice of 
optical instrumentation, microtechnical preparations, and photomicrography. Mr. Ball 

BO 421. Plant Physiology 4 or 4 

Prerequisites : BO 103, 2 courses in chemistry. 

An introductory treatment of the chemical and physical processes occurring in higher 
green plants with emphasis upon the mechanisms, factors affecting, correlations between 
processes, and biological significance. Messrs. Scofield and Troyer 

BO 441. Plant Ecology 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 103. 

An introduction to the study of plants in relation to their environment. Major topics 
considered are: factors of the environment; the structure, analysis, and dynamics of plant 
communities; past and present distribution of vegetation types. Mr. Cooper 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

BO 506. Dairy Bacteriology II 

(see DM 506) 

EO 512. Morphology of Vascular Plants 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 103. 

A study of comparative morphology, ontogeny and evolution of the 
vascular plants. Emphasis is placed upon the phylogeny of sexual repro- 
duction and of the vascular systems. Mr. Ball 

BO 513. Plant Anatomy 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 103. 

A study of the anatomy of the Angiosperms and Gymnosperms. The de- 
velopment of tissues is traced from their origin by meristems to their 
mature states. Mr. Ball 

BO 521. Systematic Botany of Monocot Families 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 103, 403. 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of monocot 

55 



families. Special emphasis is given to terminology, morphology, identifica- 
tion and relationships. Mr. Beal 

BO 523. Systematic Botany of Dicot Families 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 103, 403. 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of dicot 
families. Special emphasis is given to terminology, morphology, identifica- 
tion and relationships. Mr. Hardin 

BO 531. Soil Microbiology 

(see SOI 532) 

BO 532. Advanced Plant Physiology I 2-0 

Prerequisite: BO 421 or equivalent. 

An advanced treatment of water, solute, and gas relations of higher 
green plants, with emphasis on theoretical principles. Mr. Troyer 

BO 533. Advanced Plant Physiology II 0-2 

Prerequisite: BO 421 or equivalent. 

An advanced treatment of metabolism and growth in higher green 
plants, with emphasis on theoretical principles. Mr. Troyer 

BO 545. Advanced Plant Ecology 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 421, 441 or equivalents. 

An advanced consideration, through class discussions and individual 
projects, of the principles, theories, and methods of plant ecology. 

Mr. Cooper 

BO 570. Sanitary Microbiology 

(see CE 570). 

BO 574. Phycology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or equivalent. 

A systematic study of the structure and classification of the algae, both 
fresh-water and marine. The life history and ecology of important local 
species will be emphasized. Mr. Whitford 

Courses for Graduates Only 

BO 603. Advanced Dairy Bacteriology 

(see DM 603). 

BO 614. Physiology of Microorganisms 
(see AI 614). 

BO 620. Advanced Taxonomy 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 521, 523 or permission of instructor. 

A course in the principles of plant taxonomy including the history of 
taxonomy, systems of classification, rules of nomenclature, taxonomic 
literature, taxonomic and biosystematic methods, and monographic tech- 
niques. Mr. Hardin 

BO 632. Advanced Soil Microbiology 

(see SOI 632). 

56 



BO 635. The Mineral Nutrition of Plants 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 421 and a course in Biochemistry. 

Discussion of the accumulation, translocation and utilization of mineral 
elements by higher plants. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships 
between these processes and plant metabolism. Mr. Evans 

BO 640. Special Problems in Bacteriology Credits by arrangement 

Directed research in some specialized phase of bacteriology other than a 
thesis problem but designed to provide experience and training in re- 
search. Graduate Staff 

BO 641. Research in Bacteriology Credits by arrangement 

Original research preparatory to writing a master's thesis or a Ph.D. 
dissertation. Graduate Staff 

BO 650. Special Problems in Botany Credits by arrangement 

Directed research in some specialized phase of botany other than a 

thesis problem but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 651. Research in Botany Credits by arrangement 

Original research preparatory to writnig a master's thesis or a Ph.D. 
dissertation. Graduate Staff 

BO 660. Bacteriology Seminar 1-1 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems 
of interest to bacteriologists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student 
credit allowed if one paper per semester is presented at seminar. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 661. Botany Seminar 1-1 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to botanists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit 
allowed if one paper per semester is presented at seminar. 

Graduate Staff 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

See Department of Mineral Industries 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Edward Martin Schoenborn, Head, Kenneth Orion Beatty, 

Jr., Frederick Philips Pike. 
Associate Professors: Richard Bright, John Frank Seely. 
Assistant Professor: Eustace Robinson Conway. 

The department offers programs of advanced study and research leading 
to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Currently, be- 
tween twenty and twenty-five graduate students are in residence of which 
approximately one third are working toward the doctorate. The department 
comprises a highly competent staff which seeks to provide for intimate 
association between it and its students, to promote a common interest in 

57 



advanced professional study, and to encourage intensive investigation and 
creative activity of a high order. 

For those who can qualify, graduate work in chemical engineering is of 
increasing importance since it enables the student to attain a higher degree 
of specialized professional competence and at the same time to secure 
greater mastery of the sciences which underlie the quantitative aspects of 
chemical technology. The demand for chemical engineers with advanced 
training is greater now than at any time since the birth of the great chem- 
ical industry. In fact, the number and variety of challenging opportunities 
is steadily increasing, especially in the South which is rapidly becoming the 
new industrial frontier. The recent high concentration of industries pro- 
ducing synthetic fibers and other materials within a radius of several hun- 
dred miles of the College is but one example of this development. 

Students having had one or more years of training beyond the bacca- 
laureate are especially needed for fundamental and applied research, for 
process development and design, for production, and even for management, 
technical services and sales. Private consulting work and careers in teach- 
ing usually demand a period of advanced study well beyond the normal 
four-year undergraduate program. 

At present, major emphasis in the department is concerned with basic 
studies of unit operations such as fluid flow, heat transfer at high and low 
temperatures, distillation, solvent extraction, etc., with thermodynamics, 
reaction kinetics, phase equilibria, plastics technology, process measure- 
ment and control, and many other aspects of chemical technology. A new 
laboratory devoted exclusively to the study of thermal properties of ma- 
terials provides unique facilities for graduate work in this important field. 
Strong supporting programs of work are also available in mathematics, 
statistics, physics, chemisty, nuclear engineering, metallurgy, the life 
sciences, textiles, and other fields of engineering. 

The Department of Chemical Engineering occupies the entire four-story 
east wing of the new Riddick Engineering Laboratories building. Modern, 
well-equipped laboratories are provided with all necessary services for both 
teaching and research. A wide variety of special facilities such as X-ray 
equipment, spectrophotometers, electron microscope, electro-mechanical test- 
ing machine, electronic controllers and recorders, etc., are available for 
graduate research. 

Assistantships 

In cooperation with the Department of Eng ; neering Research, members 
of the chemical engincring staff are engaged in conducting a number of 
important research projects which are supported by industry, and by State 
and governmental agencies. Graduate students assisting on these projects 
not only acquire financial assistance but gain valuable research experience 
on problems of current interest. 

In addition to research assistantships, the department also offers each 
year a limited number of graduate assistantships for part-time work in 
the department. These may be for teaching, laboratory preparation, etc., 
or for research, as the need arise. Appointments are for one academic year 
of nine months for half-time work and at the present carry a stipend of 
$2,400. They are renewable upon evidence of satisfactory performance. 

58 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CHE 411 Unit Operations I 

Required of Juniors in Chemical Engineering. 
Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 202. 

Principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, evaporation, etc., with emphasis on design calcula- 
tions. 

CHE 412. Unit Operations II 4 "° 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering. 
Prerequisite: CHE 411. 

A continuation of CHE 411 with emphasis on the diffusional operations such as absorp- 
tion, distillation, extraction, drying, etc. 

CHE 415. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 4-0 

Required of Juniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Prerequisite: CHE 311. . 

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engineering 
problems. Emphasis on the theory, data and approximation methods as applied to physical 
and chemical systems. 

CHE 431, 432. Unit Operations Laboratory I and II 3-3 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Prerequisite: CHE 411. 

Laboratory work on typical apparatus involving the unit operations. Experiments are de- 
signed to augment the theory and data of the lecture courses and to develop proficiency in 
the writing of technical reports. 

CHE 453. Chemical Processing of Radioactive Materials 3 or 3 

Consideration of the unique procedures required for the bulk manipulation of radioactive 
chemicals. Particular attention is given to remote operational procedures of precipitation, 
centrifugation, conveying, solvent extraction and ion exchange. Design of apparatus involv- 
ing low maintenance and ease of replacement and cleaning by safe methods is considered. 
Other topics include decontamination procedures in disposal of wastes. 

CHE 460. Seminar 1 or 1 

One semester required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Literature survey of selected topics in chemical engineering. Emphasis on written and 
oral presentation. 

CHE 470. Chemical Engineering Projects. 2 or 2 

Introduction to research through experimental, theoretical and literature studies of chem- 
ical engineering problems. Oral and written presentation of reports. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHE 525. Process Measurement and Control 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 411. 

Theory and application of methods for measuring, transmitting, re- 
cording and controlling such process variables as temperature, pressure, 
flow rate, liquid level, concentration, humidity, etc. Commercial instruments 
are utilized for study of a wide variety of industrial control problems. 
Recorder-controllers are available for simulating industrial control prob- 
lems of varying difficulty. 

CHE 527. Chemical Process Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

A study of selected chemical processes with emphasis on the engineering, 
chemical and economic factors involved. Mr. Pike. 

CHE 540. Electrochemical Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry. 

The application of electrochemical principles to such topics as electrolysis, 
electroanalysis, electroplating, metal refining, etc. Mr. Schoenborn. 

CHE 541. Cellulose Industries 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry. 

Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion 



59 



products. Emphasis placed on recent developments in the field of synthetic 
fibers, films, lacquers, and other cellulose compounds. Mr. Seely. 

CHE ">12. Technology of Pulp and Paper 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry. 

Fundamentals of pulp and paper manufacture with emphasis on recent 
advances in the field. One laboratory period per week is devoted to topics 
such as digestion and treatment of pulp, hardsheet preparation and testing, 
fiber analysis, and chemical and physical tests. Mr. Seely. 

CHE 543. Technology of Plastics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry. 

The properties, methods of manufacture, and applications of synthetic 
resins. Recent developments in the field are stressed. Mr. Seely. 

CHE 545. Petroleum Refinery Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

An introduction to the petroleum industry including (1) nature of petro- 
leum and its fractions, octane numbers, viscosity relationships, etc., (2) 
operations of thermal and catalytic cracking, stabilization, alklation, iso- 
merization, crude fractionation, etc., (3) problem work covering high 
pressure phase relationships, and related material. Mr. Pike. 

CHE 546. Chemical Reaction Rates 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 415. 

A basis study of the rates of homogeneous reactions, heterogeneous re- 
actions, and catalysis. 

CHE 531. Thermal Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ME 302 or 303; or CHE 411; or equivalent. 
The design and operation of nuclear reactors and the utilization of the 
power from them involves major problems in nearly every phase of heat 
transfer, and many important problems in fluid flow. Possible solutions 
to these problems are severely affected by the influences of radiation on 
heat transfer media, hazards of handling radioactive substances, etc. The 
course considers the thermal problems of nuclear reactor design and the 
principles of fluid flow and heat transfer necessary to their solutions. 

The course is intended for engineers and science students with back- 
grounds in physics and mathematics and elementary thermodynamics. 

Mr. Beatty 

CHE 553. Separation Processes in Nuclear Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 or equivalent. 

A study of the principles and techniques of separation and purification 
of chemical components, based upon mass transfer by diffusion. Specific 
techniques covered are distillation, extraction, adsorption and ion exchange, 
particularly in regard to continuous, counter-current operations. Special 
topics include a survey of fuel processing, technology of uranium process- 
ing, complexing action of solvents, and halide distillation. 

The course is primarily intended for engineers and science students with 
backgrounds in mathematics, physics and elementary chemistry but who 
have had no previous course in separation processes. Mr. Tike 

60 



CHE 570. Chemical Engineering Projects 1 to 3 credits 

Prerequisite or concurrent: CHE 412. 

A laboratory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied field. 

Graduate Staff 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CHE 610. Heat Transfer I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 411. 

An advanced course dealing primarily with heat transfer between liquids 
and solids, optimum operating conditions and design of equipment, conduc- 
tion, heating and cooling of solids, radiant heat transmission. 

Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 611. Heat Transfer II 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: CHE 610. 

An intensive study of recent advances in heat transfer and allied fields. 

Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 612. Diffusional Operations 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

An advanced treatment of mass transfer particularly as applied to ab- 
sorption, extraction, drying, humidification and dehumidification. 

Mr. Schoenborn. 

CHE 613. Distillation 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

Vapor-liquid equilibria of non-ideal solutions, continuous distillation of 
binary and multicomponent systems, batch distillation, azeotropic and ex- 
tractive distillation. Mr. Schoenborn. 

CHE 614. Drying of Solids 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

An advanced course on the mechanism of drying operations with applica- 
tion to design of equipment, such as cabinet, tunnel, rotary, drum and 
spray driers. Mr. Pike. 

CHE 615. Thermodynamics I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 415. 

Advanced topics in chemical engineering thermodynamics including equi- 
libria of physical and chemical systems, high pressure systems, genera- 
lized properties of hydrocarbon, etc. Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 616. Thermodynamics II 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: CHE 615. 

An intensive study of recent advances in thermodynamics. 

Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 617. Catalysis of Industrial Reaction 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 546. 

A study of the mechanism of catalysis with emphasis on practical appli- 
cation to operation and design of industrial processes. Graduate Staff 



61 



CHE 631, 632. Chemical Process Design 3-3 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

Design and selection of process equipment, through solution of compre- 
hensive problems involving unit operations, kinetics, thermodynamics, 
strength of materials and chemistry. Graduate Staff. 

CHE 641, 612. Advanced Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2-2 

Prerequisite: CHE 412. 

Advanced laboratory work in a selected field with emphasis on theory, 
techniques and performance of equipment. Graduate Staff. 

CHE 650. Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering 1 to 3 credits 

per semester 
A study of recent development in chemical engineering theory and 
practice, such as ion exchange, crystallization, mixing, molecular distilla- 
tion, hydrogenation, fluorination, etc. The topic will vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff. 

CHE 660. Chemical Engineering Seminar 1 credit per semester 

Literature investigations and reports of special topics in chemical engi- 
neering and allied fields. Graduate Staff. 

CHE 680. Chemical Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Independent investigation of an advanced chemical engmeering problem. 
A report of such an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 



62 




Chemical Engineering graduate students assist technical director in research 
project investigating the flow of fluids. 



Chemical Engineering student works with special equipment to study condensa- 
tion on a rotating surface. 




Recording spectro- 
photometer for study 
of chemical systems 
by light absorption. 



Chromatographic ap- 
paratus for isolation 
of insecticide residues 
from biological ma- 
terial. 





Warburg apparatus 
for study of inter- 
mediary metabolism. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



Graduate Faculty 



Professors: Head, Thomas Glenn Bowery, Richard Henry 

Loeppert, Walter John Peterson, Willis Alton Reid, Cowin Cook 
Robinson, George Howard Satterfield, Paul Porter Sutton, Joseph 
Arthur Weybrew. 

Associate Professors: Alonzo Freemon Coots, Robert Lawrence 
Stephens, Samuel B. Tove, Raymond Cyrus White. 

Assistant Professor: George Gilbert Long. 

The Department of Agricultural and Biological Chemistry offers the De- 
gree of Master of Science in Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. Before 
the master's degree is awarded, a student must have met the requirements 
set forth by the Committee on Professional Training of the American 
Chemical Society for the baccalaureate degree, either at the institution in 
which he received his undergraduate training or at this institution. (Briefly 
the minimum course requirements in Chemistry for the bachelor's degree 
consist of four basic year courses in general chemistry, analytical chemis- 
try, physical chemistry, and organic chemistry, together with at least one 
advanced course. Mathematics, comprising the equivalent of two years of 
college work, which must include one year of differential and integral cal- 
culus, is also required). 

Instruction in Agricultural and Biological Chemistry trains students in 
this area of chemistry, strongly supported with fundamental training in 
the major divisions of chemistry and their applications. Educational, com- 
mercial, and research positions are open to men and women trained in the 
chemistry of plants, animals, soils, fertilizers, insecticides, foods and feeds, 
vitamins and nutrition, and clinical and biophysical chemistry. In the past 
the majority of graduates with the degree of Master of Science have con- 
tinued their education toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with a 
major in one of the branches of chemistry. 

The Department of Agricultural and Biological Chemistry is adequately 
equipped with standard instruments and apparatus available for both 
teaching and research. A sizeable assortment of specialized equipment is 
also available such as: refractometers, incubators, forced air ovens, several 
spectrophotometers and photoelectric colorimeters, fluorophotometers, po- 
larographs, etc. The spectrographs laboratory is one of the most com- 
plete to be found anywhere and is currently providing analyses for 10 ele- 
ments on each of 25 plant samples per week. 

An up-to-date shop equipped with standard power tools (drill press, 
lathes, band saws, etc.) is available to research workers for construction 
of special apparatus. Complete glass-blowing facilities are also available. 

Complete sets of reference works of more than one hundred chemical 
(including biochemical and nutritional) journals in English, German and 
French are accessible for student use in the D. H. Hill Library. Current 
numbers of the most widely used chemical journals (including all of those 
published by the American Chemical Society) are available in the Chem- 
istry Library. 

63 



Research: 

Some of the areas of specialization for research studies available include 
(1) the isolation, chemical nature, and nutritional significance of certain 
growth factors required by bacteria and yeasts; (2) soils and weather 
factors influencing the composition of plants; (3) vitamin and /or mineral 
studies of plants grown in the South, influence of variety, fertilization, etc.; 
(4) vitamin methodology; (5) nutritional requirements of various farm 
animals (in cooperation with the Nutrition Section, Animal Industry De- 
partment) ; (6) mechanisms involved in plant physiological processes; (7) 
techniques of spectrographs analysis and their applications in research 
with plants, soils, and animals; (8) preparation and characterization of 
fat acid esters and derived products; (9) others. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CH 401. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 215. 

Structure of matter, periodic system, electronic structure and chemical bonding, acids, 
bases, salts, preparation of elements, halogen compounds, hydrides and carbonyls. 

Messrs. White, Long. 

CH 421-422. Organic Chemistry 5-5 

Prerequisite: CH 212. 

Aliphatic and aromatic compounds, methods of preparation and purification, and identi- 
fication of compounds ; emphasis on structure and mechanism of organic reactions. 

Mr. Reid. 

CH 425-426. Orjranic Chemistry 3-3 

Prerequisite: CH 215. 

Structure, preparation, properties, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic substances. 

Mr. Loeppert. 

CH 430. Organic Preparations 0-3 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including Organic Chemistry. 

Experiments selected to acquaint the student with advanced methods and techniques in 

the preparation of organic substances. Mr. Loeppert. 

CH 451. Introductory Biochemistry 3-0 or 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 203. 
The fundamental biochemistry of living matter. Mr. Satterfield. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
CH 512. Chemistry of High Polymers (See TC 512.) 

CH 527. Advanced Survey of Organic Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including Organic Chemistry. 
Underlying principles, interpretation of mechanisms, limitations in the 
use of organic reactions. Mr. Reid. 

CH 528. Qualitative Organic Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: Three years Chemistry including Organic Chemistry. 

A study of class reactions, functional groups, separation, identification 
and preparation of derivatives. Mr. Reid. 

CH 529. Quantitative Organic Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including Organic Chemistry. 

Quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, the halogens, 
sulfur and various functional groups in organic materials, with emphasis on 
semimicro methods. Mr. Loeppert. 

CH 531-532. Physical Chemistry 3-3 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202. 

64 



An intensive study of the states of matter, solutions, colloids, homogene- 
ous and heterogeneous equilibrium, reaction kinetics, electrolysis, conduc- 
tance, oxidation reactions, ionic equilibrium. Mr. Sutton. 

CH 531L-523L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1-1 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202. 

Laboratory course to accompany lecture work in physical chemistry. 

Mr. Sutton. 

CH 533. Physical Chemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 532. 

An intensive study of the structure of atoms and molecules, an intro- 
duction to chemical statistics and selected subjects in chemical thermo- 
dynamics. Mr. Sutton. 

CH 537. Instrumental Methods of Analysis 0-4 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including CH 532. 
Physical methods of chemical analysis, the instruments employed and the 
theoretical basis for their operation. Mr. Long. 

CH 542. Colloid Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 426. 

Adsorption, preparation, properties, constitution, stability, and applica- 
tion of sols, gels, emulsions, foams, and aerosols; dialysis, Donnan mem- 
brane equilibrium. Mr. White. 

CH 543. Radioisotope Principles 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 212 or CH 215, PY 212 or PY 202, MA 212 or MA 202. 

A presentation of the basic knowledge of radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
ionizing radiations, and radiochemistry essential to competence in the use 
of radioisotopes. Mr. Coots. 

CH 543L. Radioisotope Techniques 1-0 

Prerequisite: CH 543 (prior to or concurrently, or equivalent). 
A laboratory course in the physical and chemical techniques essential 
to competence in the use of radioisotopes. Mr. Coots. 

CH 551. General Biological Chemistry 5-0 

Prerequisites: CH 422, or equivalent of three years of Chemistry. 
The chemical constitution of living matter. Biochemical processes as well 
as compounds are studied; lectures, laboratory. Mr. Peterson. 

CH 552. Physiological Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 551. 

Digestion, absorption, metabolism, secretions, and excretions. Laboratory 
will include analysis of blood and urine. Mr. Satterfield. 

CH 555. Plant Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 551. 

Composition of plants, properties, nature, and classification of plant 
constituents, changes occurring during growth, ripening, and storage of 
plants or plant products. Mr. Stephens. 

65 



CH 561. Chemistry of Carbohydrates and Lipides 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 422 or equivalent of three years of chemistry. 

Classification, composition, distribution, biosynthesis, and metabolism of 
lipides and carbohydrates; analysis, synthesis, deterioration, physical prop- 
erties, and chemical reactions are also considered. Mr. Robinson. 

CII 562. Chemistry of Proteins and Nucleic Acids 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 422, 551, or equivalent of three years of Chemistry. 
Composition, distributions, structure, properties, and metabolism of amino 
acids, proteins and nucleic acids. Mr. Peterson. 

CH 572. Chemistry of the Vitamins 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 422, or equivalent of three years of Chemistry. 
History, nomenclature, properties, distribution, effects of deficiencies, 
vitamin values. Mr. Satterfield. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CH 601. Advanced Organic Chemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 527. 

Alicyclic and heterocyclic compounds, macromolecules, standard type re- 
actions. Messrs. Reid, Loeppert, Robinson. 

CH 602. Advanced Organic Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 422, 532. 

Theoretical and physical aspects of Organic Chemistry; relations between 
chemical constitution and properties. Mr. Loeppert. 

CH 621 (AI 621). Enzymes and Intermediary Metabolism 4-0 

Prerequisites: CH 551 and permission of Instructor. 

A study of the px-operties of enzymes and enzyme action, intermediary 
metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines 
and porphrins, metabolic energy relationships. Mr. Tove. 

CH 622. Principles of Biological Assays 

(See AI 622). 

CH 631. Chemical Research Credits by arrangement. 

Prerequisites: 40 semester credits in Chemistry. Open to all graduates. 

Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of 
6 semester credits is allowed. 

Graduate Staff. 

CH 641. Seminar Credits by arrangement. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry. 

Required of graduate students specializing in Chemistry. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to chemists are reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two semester credits is allowed. 

Graduate Staff. 

CH 651. Special Topics in Chemistry Max. 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry. 
Critical study of some special problems in one of the branches of Chem- 

66 



istry, involving original investigation together with a survey of pertinent 
literature. Graduate Staff. 

CH 671, 672. Advanced Physical Chemistry 3-3 

Prerequisite: CH 532. 

The work of 671 will involve a thorough review of the fundamental 
principles of physical chemistry with extension and application of these to 
the study of the solid state. In 672 there will he laid down the elements of 
statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, in terms of which certain topics 
from 671 will be more exhaustively developed. Solution of problems will 
play an important role in 671. Mr. Sutton. 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ralph Eigil Fadum, Head, Charles Raymond Bramer, 
Charles Russell McCullough, Carroll Lamb Mann, Jr., Charles 
Smallwood, Jr., Mehmet Ensar Uyanik. 

Associate Professors: Robert Alden Douglas, Michael V. Smirnoff. 

Assistant Professor: Paul D. Cribbins, John William Horn. 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of graduate study 
leading to the degree of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Graduate course work is available in the specialty fields of sanitary engi- 
neering, soil mechanics and foundation engineering, structural engineering, 
and transportation engineering. Whereas the Master of Science program 
would normally include course work in only one of these specialty fields, 
a program of study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree would 
encompass course work in a related combination of these fields. 

Laboratory facilities for sanitary engineering research work include an 
hydraulics laboratory, a chemical laboratory and a biological laboratory. 

For work in soil mechanics and foundation engineering, a fully-equipped 
laboratory with modem soil-testing equipment is available. 

Facilities for structural engineering research include a well-equipped 
physical testing laboratory and in addition an air-conditioned structural 
models laboratory. 

Transportation engineering facilities include a bituminous laboratory, 
an airphoto interpretation laboratory, a photogrammetry laboratory, and a 
traffic engineering laboratory provided with traffic control devices. 

In addition to these facilities, equipment for research is made available 
by the Department of Engineering Research. 

Some unique opportunities for research are offered the graduate student 
in civil engineering by reason of the location of North Carolina State Col- 
lege in the State's capital city. There are a number of cooperative research 
endeavors with municipal and state governmental agencies that enable the 
student to gain valuable experience through an application of his knowledge 
and skill to practical engineering problems. 



67 



Coursas for Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 425. Structural Analysis II S-0 

Prerequisites: CE 324 and EM 321. 
Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Deflection of beams ;md trusses; indeterminate stress analysts by moment area, slope 
deflection and moment distribution. 

CE 427. Structural Design I 4-0 

Prerequisite: EM 321. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option. 

Analysis and design of reinforced concrete building elements; design of tension, compres- 
sion and simple flexural members of steel and of timber. 

CE 428. Structural Design II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 427. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Design specifications ; connection details ; independent and complete design of engineering 
structures. 

CE 429. Elements of Structural Design II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 427. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option. 

Design of tension, compression and flexural elements of steel and timber ; solution of 
problems in erection, forms, shoring and falsework. 

CE 442. Soil Mechanics 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 305. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Fundamental stress relations, Mohr's rupture hypothesis, shearing strength, earth pres- 
sure theories, bearing capacity, stability of slopes, hydrostatics, and hydrodynamics of 
ground water. 

CE 443. Foundations 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 427. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option. 

Identification and classification of soils ; geological aspects of foundation engineering ; 
methods of investigating subsoil conditions; control of water; types of foundations and con- 
ditions favoring their use; legal aspects of foundation engineering. 

CE 461. Project Planning and Control I 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 362. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option. 

Analysis of construction plant layout requirements and performance characteristics of 
equipment. 

CE 462. Project Planning and Control II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 461. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option. 

Scheduling, analysis and control of construction projects. 

CE 464. Legal Aspects of Contracting 0-3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option ; elective. 
Legal aspects of construction contract documents and specifications ; owner-engineer- 
contractor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract performance; labor laws. 

CE 481. Hydrology and Drainage 2-0 

Prereouisite : CE 382. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Occurrence and distribution of rainfall; runoff, surface and ground waters; design of 
drainage and control structures. 

CE 482. Water and Sewage Works 0-3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Water supply analysis and design, including population estimates, consumption, source 
selection, aqueducts, distribution systems and pumping stations ; elements of water treat- 
ment ; collection and disposal of sewage ; elements of sewage treatment. 

CE 485. Elemerts of Hydraulics and Hydrology 3-0 

Prerequisite : EM 312. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option. 

Elements of fluid mechanics, hydraulics and hydrology, with application to problems in 
construction engineering. 

CE 1J2. 4!)3. Professional Practice I, II 1-1 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option. 
Professional engineering societies and their functions; professional standards; topics of 
current interest to the civil engineer. 

68 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 507. Airphoto Analysis I 3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils 
and surface drainage characteristics. Mr. McCullough. 

CE 508. Airphoto Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 507. 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs for highway and airport 
projects. Mr. McCullough. 

CE 509. Photogrammetry 0-3 

Prerequisites: CE 201 or CE 217. 

Elements of photogrammetry as applied to surveying and mapping. 
Aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry. Flight planning and ground con- 
trols. Stereoscopy and stereoscopic plotting instruments. Measurements on 
photographs. Mr. Smirnoff. 

CE 510. Advanced Surveying 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CE 202. 

State coordinate systems and map projections. Elements of geodetic and 
astronomical surveying. Adjustment of observations by the method of least 
squares. Mr. Smirnoff. 

CE 514. Municipal Engineering Projects. 3-0 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Civil Engineering. 

Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning 
and city engineering. Messrs. Horn, Smallwood. 

CE 515. Transportation Operations. 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 306. 

The analysis of traffic and transportation engineering operations. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 516. Transportation Design. 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CE 306. 

The geometric elements of traffic and transportation engineering design. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 521, 522. Advanced Structural Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: CE 425. 

Complete structural designs of a variety of projects; principles of limit 
and prestress design. Messrs. Uyanik and Bramer. 

CE 524. Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 425. 

Analysis and design of arches, culverts, dams, foundations and retaining 
walls. Mr. Bramer. 

CE 531. Experimental Stress Analysis. 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 425. 

Principles and methods of experimental analysis; dimensional analysis; 
applications to full-scale structures. Mr. Bramer. 

69 



CE 532. Structural Laboratory 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 531. 

Test procedures and limitations and interpretation of experimental re- 
sults. Mr. Bramer. 

CE 544. Foundation Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CE 442. 

Subsoil investigations; excavations; design of sheeting and bracing sys- 
tems; control of water; footing; grillage and pile foundations; caisson and 
cofferdam methods of construction; legal aspects of foundation engineer- 
ing. Mr. Fadum. 

CE 547. Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics. 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EM 321. 

Physical and mechanical properties of soils governing their use for engi- 
neering purposes; stress relations and applications to a variety of funda- 
mental problems. Mr. Fadum. 

CE 548. Soil Testing for Engineering Purposes 3 to 6 

Prerequisite: CE 442 or CE 547. 

Qualitative and quantitative soil testing procedures for engineering pur- 
poses. Messrs. Fadum and McCullough. 

CE 570. Sanitary Microbiology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: BO 412. 

Dynamics of disinfection and bacteriostasis; microbiology of water and 
sewage and of sewage treatment processes. Mr. Smallwood 

CE 571. Theory of Water and Sewage Treatment 3-0 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Study of the physical and chemical principles underlying water and 
sewage treatment processes; diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium and 
ionization, anaerobic and aerobic stabilization processes, sludge conditioning 
and disposal. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 572. Unit Operations and Processes in Sanitary Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 571. 

Processes and operations in sanitary engineering; sedimentation, aeration, 
filtration, adsorption, coagulation, softening, sludge digestion, aerobic 
treatment of sewage. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 573. Analysis of Water and Sewage 3-0 

Corequisite: CE 571. 

Chemical and physical analysis of water and sewage and interpretation 
of results. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 574. Radioactive Waste Disposal 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PY 410. 

Unit operations and processes employed in treatment and disposal of 
radioactive wastes. Mr. Smallwood. 



70 



CE 591, 592. Civil Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Discussions and reports of subjects in civil engineering and allied fields. 

Graduate Staff. 

CE 598. Civil Engineering Projects Credits by arrangement 

Special projects in some phase of civil engineering. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CE 601. Transportation Planning 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 515. 

The planning, administration, economics and financing of various trans- 
portation engineering facilities. Messrs. Cribbons, Horn. 

CE 602. Advanced Transportation Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 516 
Design of major transportation engineering projects. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 603. Airport Planning and Design 3-0 

Corequisites: CE 515 and CE 516. 

The analysis, planning and design of air transportation facilities. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 604. Urban Transportation Planning 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 515. 

Thoroughfare planning as related to land usage and urban master- 
planning. Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 621, 622. Advanced Structural Analysis 1, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: CE 425. 

Analysis of rigid frames and continuous structures; treatment of re- 
dundant members and secondary stresses. Mr. Bramer. 

CE 624. Theory and Design of Arches, Thin Shells and Domes 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 621. 
Corequisite: EM 602. 

Analysis and design of hinged and rigid arches of both frame and rib 
construction; and of thin shells and domes. 

Messrs. Bramer and Uyanik. 

CE 626. Structural Connections 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 621. 

Analysis of stresses in simple, rigid and semi-rigid connections; critical 
review of specifications. Messrs. Bramer and Uyanik. 

CE 641, 642. Advanced Soil Mechanics 3-3 

Prerequisite: CE 442. 

Corequisite: CE 547. 

Theories of soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction 
between solids and water, and problems in elasticity pertaining to earth- 
work engineering. Mr. Fadum. 



71 



CE 643. Hydraulics of Ground Water 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CE 442 or CE 547. 

Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized 
porous media; the flow net solution; seepage and well problems. 

Mr. Fadum. 

CE 671. Advanced Water Supply and Sewerage 4-0 

Prerequisite: CE 482. 

Problems relating to the design of water supply and sewerage works. 

Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 672. Advanced Water and Sewage Treatment 0-4 

Prerequisite: CE 482. 
Problems relating to the treatment of water and sewage. 

Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 673. Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal 3 or 3 

Corequisite: CE 571. 

Water requirements of industry and the disposal of industrial wastes. 

Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 674. Stream Sanitation 3 or 3 

Corequisite: CE 571. 

Biological, chemical and hydrological factors that affect steam sanita- 
tion and stream use. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 698. Civil Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Independent investigation of an advanced civil engineering problem; a 
report of such an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Dairy Manufacturing is organized as a unit of the Department of Animal 
Industry. For a list of the faculty and a description of the resources of the 
Department, consult the section of the catalog under Animal Industry. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

DM 400. Dairy Plant Experience Maximum 6 

Prerequisite : Approval of Adviser. 

Practice in processing dairy products, including market milk, ice cream, cheese, butter 
and concentrated milks; application of laboratory control; and practice in dairy equipment 
maintenance. Required of all Dairy Manufacturing majors, unless proof of equivalent experi- 
ence can be shown. Staff. 

DM 401. Market Milk and Related Products 0-3 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. 

Principles and information on the production, processing, distribution, and public health 
control of fluid milk and related products. Mr. Roberts. 

DM 402. Cheese 0-8 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. 

Principles and practice in the manufacture and curing of various types of cheese; impor- 
tance and propagation of cheese starters. Mr. Warren. 

DM 403. Ice Cream and Related Frozen Dairy Foods 3-0 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. 

Choicp, preparation, and processing of ingredients and freezing of ice cream and other 
frozen desserts. Mr. Warren. 

72 



DM 404. Butter and Dairy By-Products 0-3 

Prerequisite : Approval of Instructor. 

A study of the fundamentals of buttermaking, and the principles of manufacturing con- 
centrated and dried milks. Mr. Warren. 

DM 405. Dairy Mechanics 1-0 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. 

Laboratory practice in the operation and maintenance of dairy plant equipment and 

refrigeration systems ; malfunctions of electrical systems ; installation of sanitary milk 
lines, and water lines. Staff. 

DM 40G. Judging Dairy Products 0-1 

Prerequisite : Approval of Instructor. 

Milk and dairy products judging according to official standards and commercial grades. 

Mr. Warren. 

DM 407, BO 407. Dairy Bacteriology I 4-0 

Prerequisite : General Bacteriology BO 312. 

Applications of the principles of bacteriology to the production of quality milk and main- 
tenance of quality in processing milk and milk products; various desirable and undesirable 
activities of bacteria in milk ; methods of enumerating bacteria ; detecting certain groups of 
bacteria of particular importance, and the relationship of bacteria in milk to public health. 

Mr. Speck. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

DM 501. Advanced Dairy Technology 3-0 

Prerequisite: DM 401. 

The functions and operations of a dairy control laboratory; a compre- 
hensive study of methods of analyses of dairy products and related non- 
dairy products; the application and interpretations of methods for quality 
and composition control of dairy products. Mr. Warren. 

DM 504. Dairy Plant Management 0-4 

Prerequisite: DM 401. 

Business and factory management practices as used in the dairy plant. 

Mr. Roberts. 

DM 506. (BO 506) Dairy Bacteriology II 0-3 

Prerequisite: DM 407 (BO 407) or equivalent. 

A detailed study of bacteria particularly involved in the dairy industry 
regarding their physiology, morphology, and cultural characteristics with 
application to practical dairy farm and plant problems. Mr. Speck. 

DM 508. Dairy Chemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or 203, DM 401. 

A qualitative study of the physical, colloidal and chemical properties of 

milk and its constituents. Mr. Aurand. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

DM 601. Seminar in Dairy Manufacturing 1 Credit Per Term 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Dairy Manufacturing. 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of 

interest are reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's Degree, but 

any number toward the Doctorate. Staff. 

DM 602. Advanced Dairy Chemistry 4 or 4 

Prerequisite: DM 508. 

73 



A quantitative study of the physical, colloidal, and chemical properties of 
milk and its constituents. Mr. Aurand. 

DM 603. (BO 603) Advanced Dairy Bacteriology 4 or 4 

Prerequisite: DM 506. (BO 506). 

A study of nutritional and physiological relationships among the lactic 
acid bacteria. Mr. Speck. 

DM 604. Topical Problems in Dairy Manufacturing 1 to 3 Credits 

Per Term 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Dairy Manufacturing. 

Special problems in various phases of Dairy Manufacturing. Problems 
may be selected or assigned. A maximum of six credits is allowed. Staff. 

DM 605. Research in Dairy Manufacturing Credit by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Dairy Manufacturing. 
A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's Degree; no 

limitation on credits in Doctorate Programs. Graduate Staff. 

DIESEL ENGINEERING 

See Department of Mechanical Engineering 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ernst W. Swanson, Head, C. Addison Hickman. 
Associate Professors: Robert L. Bunting, Cleon Harrell, Bernard M. 

Olsen. 
Assistant Professors: Gerald Garb, Thomas H. Park, Ching S. Shen. 

No graduate degrees are currently offered in Economics at North Caro- 
lina State College. The courses listed below are eligible for graduate credit 
when they form a part of an approved graduate program in other depart- 
ments, and Economics may serve as a minor field. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

EC 401, 402. Principles of Accounting 3-3 

Fundamental principles of accounting theory and practice ; the analysis and recording 

of business transactions; explanation and interpretation of the structure, form, and use 
of financial statements. 

EC 407. Business Law I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

A course dealing with elementary legal concepts, contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
sales of personal property, chattel mortgages, partnerships, corporations suretyship and 
bailments, insurance. 

EC 408. Business Law II 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 407. 

Deals with real property, mortgages on urban and farm lands, landlord and tenant, 
requirements for valid deed, insurance law, wills, suretyship and conditional sales. 

EC 409. Introduction to Production Costs 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 312. . 

An introduction to accounting problems peculiar to manufacturing, fabrication, and 
construction-type enterprises. Cost determination and allocation of csts for materials, 
labor, and overhead to the various units of product. Estimating and cost control in the 
production and manufacturing process. Special emphasis to be placed on analysis and in- 
terpretation of cost data. 

74 



EC 410. Industry Studies 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

An analysis of organization, market structure, and competitive behavior in specific 
industries, using the tools of the economist as a guide to pertinent factors and their signifi- 
cance. The course will be organized along the lines of intensive but broadly-relevant case- 
studies. 

EC 411. Marketing Methods 3-0 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

Marketing institutions and their functions and agencies ; retailing ; market analysis ; 
problems in marketing. 

EC 412. Sales Management 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 411. 

Elements of sales management with emphasis on planning, operations, policies and 
programs. 

EC 413. Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. EC 301 recommended but not required. 

An analysis of the effect of modern industrial structure on competitive behavior and 
performance, in the light of contemporary price theory and the theory of workable com- 
petition. A critical evaluation of the legislative content, judicial interpretation, and 
economic effects of the antitrust laws. 

EC 414. Tax Accounting 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 312 or EC 401 

An analysis of the Federal tax laws relating to the individual and business. Determining 
and reporting income. Payroll taxes and methods of reporting them. Actual practice in the 
preparation of income tax returns. 

EC 415. Advertising 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

Principles of advertising ; purposes ; preparation of copy ; media ; advertising cam- 
paigns; legislation. 

EC 420. Corporation Finance 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

Financial instruments and capital structure ; procuring funds ; managing working 
capital ; managing corporate capitalization ; financial institutions and their work. 

EC 425. Industrial Management 3-0 

Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

Principles and techniques of modern scientific management ; relation of finance, market- 
ing, industrial relations, accounting, and statistics to production ; production planning and 
control ; analysis of economic, political and social influences on production. 

EC 426. Personnel Management 0-3 

Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

The scientific management of manpower, from the viewpoint of the supervisor and the 
personnel specialist. A study of personnel policy and a review of the scientific techniques 
regarding the specific problems of employment, training, promotion, transfer, health and 
safety, employee services, and joint relations. 

EC 431. Labor Problems 3 or 3 

Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

An economic approach to labor problems including wages, hours, working conditions, 
insecurity, substandard workers, minority groups, social security, and public policy relative 
to these problems. 

EC 432. Industrial Relations 3 or 3 

Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

Collective bargaining. Analysis of basic labor law and its interpretation by the courts 
and governmental agencies. An examination of specific terms of labor contracts and their 
implications of labor and management. An examination of labor objectives and tactics and 
management objectives and tactics. Problems of operating under the labor contract. 

EC 440. Economics of Growth 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

An examination of the institutional background required for national economic develop- 
ment. The conditions apparent for past growth of nations are compared with conditions 
obtaining in presently retarded nations. Conclusions are drawn from this comparison to 
provide an introduction to theoretical models of growth. 

EC 442. Evolution of Economic Ideas 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

An analysis of the development of economic thought and method during the past two 
centuries. Economics considered as a cumulative body of knowledge, in a context of emerg- 
ing technology, changing institutions, pressing new problems, and the growth of science. 

EC 444. Economic Systems 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 
A comparative analysis of the functioning of the major economic systems, with em- 

75 



phasis upon the ways in which the problem of economic decision-making is approached 
in a variety of economic settings. 

EC 446. Economic Forecasting 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. EC 302 recommended but not required. 
An examination of the basic principles and techniques of economic forecasting with 

strong emphasis upon the economic models upon which forecasting is based. 

EC 448. International Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

A study of international economics, including trade, investment, monetary relations, and 
certain aspects of economic development. Emphasis upon analytical and policy approaches, 
although some institutional material is included. 

EC 450. Economic Decision Processes 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205 and Math 202 or Math 212. 

An analysis of processes for decision making by individuals and groups. Linear program- 
ming, probability, and game theory in the light of a general theory of decision. 

EC 461. (HI 461 or PS 461) The Soviet Union 0-3 

Prerequisites : One semester of Economics and PS 201 or HI 205 or acceptable substitute. 

An analysis of the structure and function of the major Soviet economic, political and 
social institutions with special stress on the historical roots and continuity of Russian 
civilization. The course is presented in three equal phases of approximrtely five weeks 
each, covering Russian history, Soviet government and Soviet economy. 

EC 490. Senior Seminar in Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

The terminal course in undergraduate study of economics. The student is assisted in 
summarizing his training, and in improving his capacity to recognize problems and to 
select logically consistent means of solving the problems. This is done on a small-group 
and individual basis. 

Courses fcr Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EC 501 (AGC 501). Intermediate Economic Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 301 or AGC 212, or equivalent. 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and of market 
behavior, including demand, costs and production, pricing under competitive 
conditions, and pricing under monopoly and other imperfectly competitive 
conditions. Messrs. Bunting, Garb, Park, Shen. 

EC 502. Money, Income, and Employment 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 302 or EC 501, or equivalent. 

A study of the methods and concepts of national income analysis with 
particular reference to the role of monetary policy in maintaining full 
employment without inflation. Messrs. Bunting, Garb, Olsen. 

EC 503. Advanced Accounting 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, and EC 401, 402. 

Problems of asset valuation, such as depreciation, replacements, amorti- 
zation, etc., as found in all types of business organizations; branch ac- 
counting, consolidations, installment selling. Messrs. Fails, Shulenberger. 

EC 501, 505. Principles of Cost Accounting 3-3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205 and EC 401, 402. 

Cost finding, materials costs, labor costs, overhead costs, etc., with 
an introduction to standard cost procedures. Mr. Shulenberger. 

EC 510 (PS 510). Public Finance 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending, 
and borrowing, including intergovernmental relationships and administra- 
tive practices and problems. Mr. Block. 

76 



EC 515. Investments 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. 

Types of investment; investment market; investment analysis; invest- 
ment channels; investment fluctuations; investment policies and practices. 

Staff. 

EC 525. Management Policy and Decision Making 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: 9 hours in Economics and related courses and consent of 
the instructor. 

A review and consideration of modern management processes used in 
making top-level policies and decisions. An evaluation of economic, social 
and institutional pressures, and of the economic and non-economic motiva- 
tions, which impinge upon the individual and the organization. The problem 
of coordinating the objectives and the mechanics of management is exa- 
mined. Messrs. Bartley, Wood. 

EC 531. Management of Industrial Relations 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: 9 hours in Economics and related courses and consent of 
the instructor. 

A seminar course designed to round out the technical student's program. 
Includes a survey of the labor movement organization and structure of 
unions, labor law and public policy, the union contract, the bargaining 
process, and current trends and tendencies in the field of collective bar- 
gaining. Messrs. Bartley, Wood. 

EC 550. Mathematical Models in Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205 and MA 202 or MA 212. EC 450 rec- 
ommended but not required. 

An introductory study of economic models emphasizing their formal 
properties. The theory of individual economic units is presented as a 
special case in the theory of inductive behavior. Mathematical discussions 
of the theory of the consumer, the theory of the firm, and welfare eco- 
nomics will show the relevance of such topics as constrained maxima 
and minima, set theory, partially and simply ordered systems, probability 
theory, and game theory to economics. Mr. Harrell. 

EC 552. Econometrics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205 and MA 202 or MA 212 and MA 405. 

Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation, and organi- 
zation. Optimal combination of integrated productive processes within 
the firm. Applications in the economics of industry and of agriculture. 

Mr. Harrell. 

EC 590, 591. Seminar in Special Economic Topics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Topics presented by a visiting professor or special lecturer. This course 
will be offered from time to time as distinguished visiting scholars are 
available. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

EC 601. Advanced Economic Theory 3 or 3 

77 



Prerequisite: EC 501, or equivalent. 

A rigorous examination of contemporary microeconomic theory. 

Messrs. Bunting, Garb, Swanson. 

EC 602. Monetary and Employment Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 502, or equivalent. 

The course consists of an analysis of the forces determining the level of 
income and employment; a review of some of the theories of economic 
fluctuations; and a critical examination of a selected macroeconomic sys- 
tem. Messrs. Garb, Olsen, Swanson. 

EC 603. History of Economic Thought 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 442 or EC 501, or equivalent. 

A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic 
thought, designed in part to pi-ovide a sharper focus and more adequate 
perspective for the understanding of contemporary economics. 

Messrs. Olsen, Hickman. 

EC 605. Research in Economics Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

Individual research in economics, under staff supervision and direction. 

Staff. 

EC 640. Theory of Economic Growth 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 440 or EC 502, or equivalent. 

Several theoretical models of economic growth are compared and analyzed 
Contemporary developments in the theory of national economic growth are 
studied and evaluated for consistency with older theories. Mr. Olsen. 

EC 648. Theory of International Trade 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 448 or EC 501, or equivalent. 

A consideration, on a seminar basis, of the specialized body of economic 
theory dealing with the international movement of goods, services, capital, 
and payments. Also, a theoretically-oriented consideration of policy. 

Mr. Hickman. 

EC 650. Economic Decision Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent; EC 550 or EC 555. 

Study of general theories of choice. Structure of decision problems; 
the role of information; formulation of objectives. Current research 
problems. Mr. Harrell. 

EC 655. Topics in Mathematical Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent; EC 550 or EC 555. 
A seminar and research course devoted to recent literature and develop- 
ments in mathematical economics. Mr. Harrell. 

EC 665. Economic Behavior of the Organization 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. 

This seminar will apply methods and findings derived from the behavior- 
al sciences to the economic behavior of the organization, particularly the 
business firm. Among the approaches which may be utilized are organiza- 
tion theory, information theory, reference group theory, and decision 
theory. Messrs. Harrell, Hickman, Swanson. 

78 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: James Bryant Kirkland, Dean, Roy Nels Anderson, Key 
Lee Barkley, Harold Maxwell Corter, Thomas I. Hines, Ivan 
Hostetler, Howard G. Miller, Clarence Cayce Scarborough. 

Associate Professors: John 0. Cook, Gerald Blaine James, J. Clyde 
Johnson, Charles G. Morehead, Slater E. Newman, Paul James 
Rust, Talmage B. Young. 

The School of Education offers graduate programs leading to the Master's 
degree in Agricultural Education, Industrial Arts Education, Industrial 
Education, Occupational Information and Guidance, and Industrial Psy- 
chology. Graduate students in education may pursue programs leading to 
the Master of Science degree or to the Master's degree in a professional 
field. Both degrees are recognized by the State Department of Education. 

The Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science degree is regarded as a research degree and as 
preparation for further graduate study. Programs leading to the Master of 
Science degree are planned to include a major (20 credit hours) in some 
specialized area of education and a minor (10 or more credit hours) in some 
other field such as psychology or agricultural economics. If two minors are 
chosen, a minimum of 6 credits will be required in each. 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language is required. 

A thesis representing an original investigation in the major field must be 
prepared. 

The Master's Degree in a Professional Field. 

The professional degree is designed to meet the needs of students who 
are preparing themselves for teaching in the secondary schools. The pro- 
gram of study meeting the requirements for this degree differs from that 
expected for the Master of Science in that a wider latitude is permitted in 
the choice of course work outside the major. 

A problem may be substituted for a thesis if, in the opinion of the 
student's advisory committee, this alternative contributes maximally to the 
student's objective. 

A knowledge of a foreign language is not required to meet the require- 
ments for the professional degree. 

A total of at least thirty credit hours is required, at least eight hours 
of which must be in course work at the 600 level. Not more than six 
semester hours will be accepted at the 400 level and all of these must fall 
outside of the major field. 

Research Facilities 

The School of Education is located in Tompkins Hall where well equipped 
laboratories and research facilities are provided for graduate study. 

79 



The Department of Industrial Arts has a well equipped laboratory for 
students to secure practical experience and to carry out experimental and 
research programs. The laboratory has been rated as one of the best in the 
Southeast. In addition, the Department utilizes the industrial arts facilities 
of the public schools for research work. 

The Department of Psychology carries on its major research and service 
activities through the Industrial Psychology Center. The Center is staffed 
and equipped to provide general industrial psychology research and serv- 
ices such as personnel selection, personnel evaluation, attitude surveys, or- 
ganization planning, management and supervisory training and other 
industrial psychology research and service activities. The Department also 
maintains an applied experimental laboratory in which graduate training 
and research are carried on. 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance utilizes the 
facilities of the public schools, Public Employment Bureau, business and 
industrial establishments, Welfare Agencies and Vocational Rehabilitation 
Centers as laboratories in which students can acquire practical experience 
while working for the Master's degree. 

The Department of Agricultural Education utilizes the resources of the 
School of Agriculture and the Experiment Station. Problems of the local 
school community provide the basis for much of the research in Agricultural 
Education. 

Holders of advanced degrees in education are much in demand to fill re- 
sponsible positions in the secondary school system of the State. Teachers 
with advanced degrees qualify for Graduate Teacher's Certificates which 
automatically place them in higher salary brackets. 

GENERAL COURSES 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 501. Education of Exceptional Children 3-0 

Advanced undergraduates or graduates. Prerequisite: six hours in educa- 
tion or psychology. 

Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child 
with major interest on the mentally handicapped and slow learner. Prac- 
tice will be given in curriculum instruction for groups of children, indi- 
vidual techniques for dealing with retarded children in the average class- 
room. Opportunity for individual work with an exceptional child will be 
provided. Mr. Corter. 

ED 502. Analysis of Reading Abilities 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education or psychology. 

A study of tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study 
of reading retardation and factors underlying reading difficulties. 

Mr. Rust. 

ED 503. Improvement of Reading Abilities 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours of education or psychology. 

A study of methods used in developing specific reading skills or in over- 

80 



coming certain reading difficulties; a study of methods used in developing 
pupil vocabularies and work analysis skills; a study of how to control vo- 
cabulary burden of reading material. Mr. Rust. 

ED 505. Groop Dynamics in Teaching 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education or psychology. 

A study of group methods in teaching with special reference in role 
playing, conference techniques, and group dynamics in their application 
to teaching and an understanding of the student's behavior. Mr. Miller. 

ED 509. Workshop in Special Education Maximum 6 Credits 

Prerequisite: ED 501 and six hours in Psychology (Summer only) 

The workshop in Special Education provides opportunity for group proj- 
ects in all aspects of special education, and group participation in develop- 
ment of individual projects. Public relations, library facilities, occupa- 
tional surveys, methods and materials, development of new programs, units 
of work and room planning are examples of projects. Project materials are 
collected, mimeographed, and distributed to class members to serve as a 
handbook for future use. Materials are frequently tried out in the practi- 
cum. Specific subject matter areas to meet formal certification require- 
ments for special education are also taught in small groups. 

Mr. Corter. 

ED 510. Advanced Driver Education 3 (Summer only) 

Prerequisite: Ed 410. 
The study of course content in present day driver education courses: 

Evaluation of research literature in driver education; a study of existing 
driver education programs at both secondary and college levels; and evalua- 
tion of psychological and educational research in accidents. 

ED 552. Industrial Arts in the Elementary School 3 (Summer only) 

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in education and consent of instructor. 
This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals under- 
stand how tools and materials and industrial processes may be used to 
vitalize and supplement the elementary school children's experiences. Prac- 
tical children's projects along with the building of classroom equipment. 

Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 563. Effective Teaching 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie 
course approaches; identifying problems of importance; problem solution 
for effective learning; relationship of learning and doing; responsibility 
for learnings; evaluation of teaching and learning; making specific plans 
for effective teaching. Messrs. James, Scarborough. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 614. Modern Principles and Practices in Secondary Education 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

Foundations of modern programs of secondary education; purposes, 

81 



curriculum, organization, administration, and the place and importance of 
the high school in the community in relation to contemporary social force. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 615. Introduction to Educational Research 3-0 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

An introductory course for students preparing for an advanced degree. 
The purposes are: to assist the student in understanding the meaning and 
purpose of educational research and the research approach to problems; 
to develop students' ability to identify educational problems, and to plan 
and carry out research to solve these problems; to aid in the preparation 
of the research report. Special attention is given to tools and methods of 
research. Consideration is also given to the educator as a consumer of 
research. Graduate Staff. 

ED 665. Supervising Student Teaching 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

A study of the program of student teaching in teacher education. 
Special consideration will be given the role of the supervising teacher 
including the following areas: planning for effective student teaching, 
observation and orientation, school community study, analysis of situation, 
evaluating student teacher, and coordination with State College. 

Graduate Staff. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 554. Planning Programs of Vocational Agriculture 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 411. 

Consideration of the community as a unit for planning programs in 
agricultural education; objectives and evaluation of community programs; 
use of advisory groups; school and community relationships; organization 
of the department and use of facilities. 

Messrs. Scarborough and James. 

ED 558. Special Problems in Teaching Max. G 

Prerequisite: ED 411. Credits. 

Current problems in agricultural education. Opportunities for students 

to study particular problems under the guidance of the staff. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 563. Effective Teaching 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie 
course approaches; identifying problems of importance; problem solu- 
tion for effective learning; evaluation of teaching and learning; making 
specific plans for effective teaching. Messrs. James, Scarborough. 

ED 568. Adult Education in Agriculture 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 411. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers as leaders in adult 

82 



education. More emphasis is being given to working with adults as part of 
the community program of vocational agriculture. This course will give 
the teacher an opportunity to study some of the basic problems and values 
in working with adult groups. Particular attention will be given to the 
problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the high school 
program of vocational agriculture, as well as to methods of teaching adults. 

Messrs. Scarborough and James. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 616. Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 558. 

Group study in current and advanced problems in the teaching and ad- 
ministration of agricultural education; evaluation of procedures and con- 
sideration for improving. Graduate Staff. 

ED 617. Philosophy of Agricultural Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 554. 

An examination of current educational philosophies and their relation 
to agricultural education. Principles and practices involved in the leader- 
ship of a teacher of agriculture and in making his work effective in a 
rural community. Study of leaders in the field. Mr. Scarborough. 

ED 618. Seminar in Agricultural Education Max. 2 

credits 
A critical review of current problems, articles, and books of interest 
to students of agricultural education. Graduate Staff. 

ED 621. Research in Agricultural Education Max. 6 

credits 

Individual direction in research on a specific problem of concern to the 

student. Generally, the student is preparing his thesis or research problem. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 664. Supervision in Agricultural Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 563. 

Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of 
present supervisory practice; theory, principles and techniques of effective 
supervision in agricultural education at different levels. 

Messrs. Kirkland, Scarborough. 
ED 665. Supervising Student Teaching 

(See description on p. 82) 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

AND 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

IA 510. Design for Industrial Arts Teachers 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of Drawing and IA 205 or equivalent. 
A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on 

83 



the relationship of material and form in the selection and designing of 
industrial arts projects. Graduate Staff. 

ED 516. Community Occupational Surveys 0-2 

Prerequisites: Six credits in Education and consent of instructor. 
Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of 

findings in planning a program of vocational education. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 521. Organization of Related Study Materials 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: ED 422. 

The principles of selecting and organizing both technical and general 
related instructional material for trade extension and diversified occupa- 
tions classes. Graduate Staff. 

ED 525. Trade Analysis and Course Construction 2-0 

Prerequisites: ED 344 PSY 304. 

Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of 
determining teaching content. Practice in the principles underlying indus- 
trial course organization based on occupational analysis covering instruction 
in skills and technology and including course outlines, job sequences, the 
development of industrial materials and instructional schedules. 

Gradute Staff. 

ED 527. Philosophy of Industrial Education 0-2 

Prerequisite: ED 422. 

A presentation of the historical development of industrial education; the 
philosophy of vocational education; study of Federal and State legislation 
pertaining to vocational education; types of programs, trends and prob- 
lems. Graduate Staff. 

ED 528. Principles and Practices in Diversified Occupations 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: ED 422. 

A study of the development, the objectives, and principles of diversified 
occupations. The organization, promotion and management of programs in 
this area of vocational education. Graduate Staff. 

ED 552. Industrial Arts in the Elementary School 3 or 3 

(See description on page 81). 

IA 570. Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts Max. 6 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor. 
Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced 
majors in industrial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify 
their knowledge and abilities through investigation and research in the 
various fields of industrial arts, such as metals, plastics, or ceramics. 

Graduate Staff. 

IA 575. Special Problems in Industrial Arts Max. 6 

Prerequisite: One term of student teaching or equivalent. 

The purpose of these courses is to broaden the subject matter experiences 
in the areas of industrial arts. Problems involving experimentation, 



84 



investigation and research in one or more industrial arts areas will be 
required. Graduate Staff. 

IA 580. Modern Industries 2-2 

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in Industrial Arts and consent of the in- 
structor 

Elective course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in 
industrial arts. Designed to assist teachers in guiding students to sources 
of information relative to various modern industries. Mr. Young. 

ED 595. Industrial Arts Workshop 3 (Summer only). 

Prerequisite: One or more years of teaching experience. 
A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of 
industrial arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and 
practices for initiating, conducting and evaluating programs in this field. 
Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical experiences and will do 
intensive research work on individual and group problems. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 610. Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education 2 or 2 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, 420, 440, or equivalent. 

Administrative and supervisory problems of vocational education; prac- 
tices and polices of Federal and State offices; organization and administra- 
tion of city and consolidated systems. Graduate Staff. 

ED 614. Modern Principles and Practices in Secondary Education. 

(See description on p. 81). 

ED 619. Seminar in Industrial Arts Education 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

Presentation of current literature in the field of Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 624. Research in Industrial Arts Education Max. 6 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education and permission of instructor. 
The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research 
problems and in the organization of the problems, methods of gathering 
data, procedure for analyzing data, and the best practice for interpreting 
and reporting data. Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 627. Research in Industrial Education Max. 6 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education and permission of instructor. 
The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research 
problems and in the organization of the problems, methods of gathering 
data, procedure for analyzing data, and best practice for interpreting and 
reporting data. Graduate Staff. 

ED 630. Philosophy of Industrial Arts 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

Required of all graduate students in Industrial Arts Education. 

Current and historical developments in industrial arts; philosophical 

85 



concepts, functions, scope, criteria for the selection and evaluation of 
learning experiences, laboratory organization, student personnel programs, 
community relationships, teacher qualifications, and problems confronting 
the industrial arts profession. Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 635. Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education. 

A study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision 
in the improvement of industrial arts in the public schools. Selection of 
teachers and their improvement in service and methods of evaluating 
industrial arts programs. Mr. Hostetler. 

OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

Special facilities are provided in the School of Education for mature 
students and individuals who have had teaching or personnel experience 
and who hold a Bachelor's Degree to enroll for courses leading to a Master's 
Degree in Occupational Information and Guidance, or a Master of Science 
Degree in this area. Graduate work in Occupational Information and Guid- 
ance gives preparation for such positions as counselor in secondary schools, 
colleges, or community agencies; school guidance director; employment 
counselor; placement workers; business or industrial personnel worker; and 
for personnel work in the State and Federal Government. Administrators, 
supervisors, directors of instruction, and others who may wish to prepare 
themselves for positions of leadership in guidance work may also utilize 
this graduate program. 

The offerings of the Department of Occupational Information and Guid- 
ance enable graduate students in teaching areas to select appropriate 
guidance courses which will enable them to provide guidance and counseling 
for their pupils, as well as to exert influence in promoting a school-wide 
guidance program. 

The Master's program includes a core of Guidance courses as f ollows : Ed. 
524, Occupational Information; Ed. 533, Organization and Administration 
of Guidance Services; Ed. 631, Educational and Vocational Guidance; Ed. 
633, Techniques in Guidance and Personnel; Ed. 641, Field Work; and Ed. 
651, Research. In addition to the core courses, the typical program for 
school counselors includes Psy. 530, Abnormal Psychology, Psy. 535, Tests 
and Measurements, Psy 571, Intelligence: Theory and Measurement, ED. 
530, Group Guidance, and Ed. 615, Introduction to Educational Research. 
Opportunity for field work is available in secondary schools, colleges, 
clinics, and employment offices, and other agencies, according to the stu- 
dent's interest. Courses in Psychology, Sociology, Economics, and Educa- 
tion are selected to round out the program. In addition to meeting 
the requirements for the Master's degree, the program also meets the re- 
quirements for the Counselor's Certificate issued by the State Department 
of Public Instruction, as well as similar certificates in many other states. 

In addition to the graduate program, the Department provides instruc- 
tion in guidance for undergraduate students in the School of Education. 



86 



Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling 

A new program made possible by a grant from the Office of Vocational 
Rehabilitation of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and 
begun in the Spring of 1955, provides for the training of vocational rehabil- 
itation counselors. In this program an interdisciplinary approach is used, 
with students taking the basic core of guidance courses enumerated above, 
and rounding out their programs with course work in the Department of 
Psychology, Sociology, Economics. Several new courses, designed espe- 
cially for the preparation of rehabilitation counselors, are offered in 
the Department of Occupational Information and Guidance, and also in 
other departments on the campus: Education 531, Introduction to Vocational 
Rehabilitation, Ed. 532, Medical Information for Rehabilitation Counselors, 
and Sociology 505, Sociology of Rehabilitation in the Department of So- 
ciology. 

Part of the counselor training consists of an internship to be served in 
one of the various types of public or private agencies that provide counsel- 
ing services to the handicapped. The student has the opportunity to select 
an internship setting according to his own interests. 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance has received 
eighteen scholarships of $1800 each to be awarded as Traineeship Grants 
in the program sponsored by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. These 
scholarships are provided for the purpose of increasing the number of 
qualified workers in the area of rehabilitation. 

Individuals qualified to provide vocational counseling for the handicapped 
are in great demand at the present time, and the future demand will be 
even greater. The impetus to rehabilitation services given by the Office of 
Vocational Rehabilitation will result in numerous occupational opportunities 
for those who have an interest in helping handicapped persons to become 
vocationally self sufficient. 

Application forms for these scholarships may be secured from Dr. Roy N. 
Anderson, Head, Department of Occupational Information and Guidance, 
School of Education. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 420. Principles of Guidance 2-2 

Prerequisites : PSY 304, PSY 476, student teaching or equivalent. 

This is a course designed to provide basic principles of guidance for teachers, teacher- 
counselors, administrators, and othsrs in the school, as well as workers in other areas Buch 
as the community agency, business, industry, group work, and the like. Among the topics 
covered are : need for guidance ; basis of guidance services ; programs of guidance ; studying 
the individual ; counseling for educational, vocational, social, and personal problems : group 
procedures in guidance. Emphasis is on the practical application of guidance principles and 
procedures. Mr. Moiehead. 

ED 424. Occupational Studies 0-2 

Designed for majors in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education and emphasizing indus- 
trial occupations. Uses of educational and occupational information, sources, preparation 
and interpretation of occupational materials. Occupational and industrial structure; local 
and national trends, occupations in selected industries. Labor legislation, Job adjustment 
and satisfaction. Providing occupational information to individuals and groups. 

Mr. Morehead. 



87 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 524. Occupational Information 0-3 

Prerequisites: 6 hours of education or psychology and ED 420 or equiva- 
lent. 

This course is designed to prepare teachers, counselors, business and 
industrial personnel workers, placement workers, and others to collect 
evaluate, and use occupational and educational information. In addition to 
the study of the usual sources and types of published occupational in- 
formation, attention will be given to collection of occupational information 
locally, preparation of the occupational monograph, analysis of job require- 
ments and worker characteristics, occupational trends and factors affecting 
trends, occupational and industrial structure and classification, and the 
like. Imparting occupational information to groups and individuals by 
techniques such as the following are considered: The occupations unit in 
social studies and other courses, the occupations course, home-room 
activities, introducing occupational information informally in subject mat- 
ter courses, the resource file, vocational counseling. Mr. Morehead. 

ED 530. Group Guidance 0-3 

Prerequisites: 6 hours of education or psychology and ED 420 or equiva- 
lent. 

This course is designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators, and 
others who work with groups or who are responsible for group guidance 
activities, to understand the theory and principles of effective group work, 
to develop skill in using specific guidance techniques, and to plan and 
organize group activities in the secondary school and other institutions. 
The relationship of group activities to counseling and other aspects of 
guidance services is considered. Methods of evaluating and improving group 
guidance activities are taken up. Mr. Morehead. 

ED 531. Introduction to Vocational Rehabilitation 3-0 

Prerequisites: 6 hours from following fields — Economics, Education, Psy- 
chology or Sociology. 

This course will serve as an introduction to the broad field of rehabilita- 
tion services and programs directed toward the restoration of physically 
and/or mentally disabled persons into employment. The course will em- 
phasize the State-Federal, and private agency programs. It will be inter- 
disciplinary in its approach covering the areas of social work, medicine, 
psychology, sociology and economics. Specialists or appropriate persons in 
the above areas wil be invited to participate. Field trips to agencies will be 
required. Mr. Anderson. 

ED 532. Medical Information for Rehabilitation Counselors 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. 

This course is designed for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and 
other workers in rehabilitation. The course will provide counselors with 
the necessary background in medical information and terminology so that 
they can understand and interpret medical information in the integrated 
rehabilitation process. The course will consist of lectures by medical spe- 
cialists who will present the methods of diagnosis, treatment, and the re- 



habilitation aspects of disabling conditions. Visits will be made to clinics. 

Mr. Anderson. 

ED 533. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 3-0 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and ED 420 or equivalent. 
This course is designed for school guidance workers and those preparing 
for this field. Basic principles and current practices employed in develop- 
ing, organizing, administering, and supervising guidance services in the 
elementary and secondary school will be studied. Interrelationship of 
guidance services with instruction, administrative relationships, utilization 
of school staff, and evaluation of guidance services will be considered. 

Mr. Morehead. 

ED 590. Individual Problems in Guidance 3-3 

Prerequisites: 6 hours graduate work in Department or equivalent. 

Intended for individual or group studies of one or more of the major 
problems in Guidance and Personnel work. Problems will be selected to 
meet the interests of individuals. The workshop procedure will be used 
whereby special projects and reports will be developed by individuals and 
by groups. Messrs. Anderson, Morehead. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 631. Educational and Vocational Guidance 3-0 

Prerequisites: 9 hours from following fields — Economics, Education, Psy- 
chology or Sociology. 

This course aims to provide training for teachers who are part-time or 
full-time counselors, employment interviewers, social workers and personnel 
workers, who are aiding individuals with vocational adjustment problems. 
The course will cover the functions performed in vocational and educational 
guidance such as assembling and imparting occupational information, 
counseling regarding vocational and educational plans, the use of aptitude 
tests, placement in jobs and follow-up, and procedures in setting up services 
of vocational and educational guidance in schools, employment offices, and 
social service agencies. Mr. Anderson. 

ED 633. Techniques in Guidance and Personnel 0-3 

Prerequisites: 9 hours from following fields — Economics, Education, Psy- 
chology or Sociology. 

This course is designed to aid personnel workers in secondary schools, 
colleges, employment offices, and social agencies to develop an understand- 
ing and to develop skill in using various guidance and personnel techniques. 
Some of the techniques to be studied intensively are: anecdotal reports, 
rating scales, observation, records and reports, sociograms, interviewing, 
counseling and case study procedures. Students will become acquainted 
with these techniques through lectures, demonstrations, and the study of 
case histories. Attention will be given to both diagnosis and treatment. 

Mr. Anderson. 

ED 641. Field work in Occupational Information and Guidance 2 to 6 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. 

89 



A practicum course in which the student undertakes field work in second- 
ary schools", colleges, social service agencies, employment office, and indus- 
trial establishments which carry on guidance and personnel work. The 
student may observe and participate in some personnel service and may 
study the organization and administration of the programs. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead. 

ED 651. Research in Occupational Information and Guidance Maximum 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. 6 credits 

Qualified students will conduct investigations and research in Guidance 

and Personnel. Published reports and techniques in investigation will be 

analyzed and evaluated. Messrs. Anderson, Morehead. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

See Psychology 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: George Burnham Hoadley, Head, William John Barclay, 

John Harold Lampe, William Damon Steveson, Jr. 
Associate Professors: Norman Robert Bell, Wilbur Carroll Peterson. 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing are the Master of Science (M.S.) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Graduate work in Electrical Engineering at the first-year or master's level 
divides naturally into fields such as electronics, automatic control, com- 
puters, and power systems. In the more advanced study required for the 
doctorate, however, this distinction tends to disappear. 

Advanced courses of a general and fundamental nature, such as Electric 
Network Synthesis and Advanced Electromagnetic Theory, are recom- 
mended for all graduate students in Electrical Engineering, especially 
those who plan to carry their advanced studies to the level of the doctorate. 
Minor sequences of study in advanced mathematics or physics are planned 
to fit the needs of individual students. 

Holders of graduate degree in electrical engineering at North Carolina 
State College are in continual demand. Alumni hold important positions in 
industrial, government, and university research laboratories, in the teach- 
ing profession, and in the administrative and engineering departments of 
manufacturing corporations and public utilities. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

EE 414. Electronics 0-4 

Prerequisites: EE 301. PY 407. 

A study of the fundamentals of electrical conduction in vacuum, gases, and solids. 
Operating characteristics of vacuum and gaseous tubes, mercury arc rectifiers, photoelectric 
cells, cathode-ray tubes and solid state devices. Introduction to electronic circuit theory. 
One laboratory period a week illustrates the theory covered during lecture and recitation 
periods. 

Mr. Thompson. 

EE 430. Essentials of Electrical Engineering 4-0 

Prerequisites: MA 301, EE 332. 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

90 



Essential theory of electric circuits, including electron tubes, solid state devices, trans- 
formers and rotating machines ns needed to supply the electrical background for instru- 
mentation and control theory. Intended primarily for graduate students who do not have 
an electrical engineering undergraduate degree. Mr. Manning. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

EE 501. Advanced Circuits and Fields I 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, MA 301. 

Transient analysis of electric circuits by the Laplace transform method. 
The study of transient and sinusoidal steady-state response in terms of 
poles and zeros of network functions. Mr. Stevenson. 

EE 502. Advanced Circuits and Fields II 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 302, MA 301. 

A study of classical electric and magnetic field theory and its application 
to the problems of electrical engineering. Consideration of electrostatics, 
magnetostatics, radiation, and guided waves, using vector methods. 

Mr. Mott. 

EE 511. Electronic Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 414. 

Comprehensive coverage of circuits and equipment using electronic de- 
vices; variable frequency effects; amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, de- 
tectors, wave-shaping circuits, generators of non-linear waveforms; basic 
pulse techniques; principles of electronic analogue computers. Emphasis 
on quantitative analysis and engineering design. Mr. Barclay. 

EE 512. Communication Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 511. 

Application of electronic circuits and equipment to radio and wire com- 
munication systems. Elements of complete systems, wave propagation, 
antennas, transmitters, receivers, television, radar, electronic navigation 
systems, noise, special applications. Mr. Barclay. 

EE 513. Electric Power Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, 305. 

A study of industrial power supply and power factor correction; direct 
and alternating current motor characteristics, starting methods, dynamic 
braking and speed control; motor applications, and industrial control ap- 
paratus. Mr. Bell. 

EE 514. Power System Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 302, 305. 

Analysis of problems encountered in the long-distance transmission of 
electric power. Line parameters by the method of geometric mean dis- 
tances. Circle diagrams, symmetrical components, and fault calculations. 
Elementary concepts of power system stability. Applications of digital com- 
puters to power-system problems. Mr. Stevenson. 

EE 515. Elements of Control 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 414, EE 305. 

Introductory theory of open and closed loop control. Functions and per- 
formance requirements of typical control systems and system components. 
Dynamic analysis of error detectors, amplifiers, motors, demodulators, 

91 



analogue components and switching devices. Component transfer char- 
acteristics and block diagram representation. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 516. Feedback Control Systems 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 501, EE 515. 

Study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities 
such as voltage, speed and mechanical position. Theory of regulating sys- 
tems and servo-mechanisms. Steady state and transient responses. Eval- 
uation of stability. Transfer function loci and root locus plots. Analysis 
using differential equation and operational methods. System compensa- 
tion and introduction to design. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 517. Control Laboratory 0-1 

Corequisite: EE 516. 

Laboratory study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical 
quantities such as voltage, speed and mechanical position. Characteristics 
of regulating systems and servomechanisms. The laboratory work is in- 
tended to contribute to an understanding of the theory developed in EE 
516, Feedback Control Systems. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 518. Instrumentation and Control in Nuclear Technology 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 430, or EE 301, EE 305, EE 414; and MA 301. 

Radiation detectors, pulse amplifiers, pulse shapers, amplitude discrimina- 
tors, counters, coincidence circuits, reactor kinetics reactor simulators, 
automatic control of reactors. Mr. Manning. 

EE 520. Fundamentals of Digital Systems 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 414 or EE 430. 

The basic theory of digital computation and control. Introduction to 
number systems, data handling, relay algebra, switching logic, memory 
circuits, the application of electronic devices to switching circuits, and the 
design of computer control circuits. Mr. Bell. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

EE 605, 606. Electrical Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in EE. 

A series of papers and conferences participated in by the instructional 
staff, invited guests, and students who are candidates for advanced degrees. 

Graduate Staff. 

EE 611, 612. Electric Network Synthesis 3-3 

Prerequisite: EE 501. 

A study of modern network theory, with the emphasis on synthesis, based 
on the work of Brune, Bode, Quillemin Bott and Duffin, Darlington, Foster 
and many others. Both the realization problem and the approximation prob- 
lem will be treated. Mr. Hoadley. 

EE 613. Advanced Feedback Control 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 516. 

An advanced study of feedback systems for the control of physical 
variables. Analysis of follower systems and regulators. Mathematical and 

92 



graphical description of systems. Stability theory and performance criteria. 
Frequency response and root locus methods of analysis. System compensa- 
tion and design. Introductory analysis of non-linear systems. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 615. Electromagnetic Waves 4-0 

Prerequisite: EE 502. 

Maxwell's Equations applied to a study of the propagation of energy by 
electromagnetic waves. Vector and scalar potentials, retarded potentials, 
reflection and refraction, power flow and energy density; plane, rectangular 
and cylindrical wave guides; lines and cavity resonators. Laboratory on 
microwave techniques and measurements. Mr. Barclay. 

EE 616. Microwave Engineering 0-4 

Prerequisite: EE 615. 

Analysis and design of microwave devices and systems. Theory and ap- 
plication of klystrons, magnetrons, traveling-wave tubes, masers, para- 
metric amplifiers and other modern high-frequency devices. 

Mr. Barclay. 

EE 617. Pulse Switching & Timing Circuits 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 501, EE 512. 

Tube and transistor circuit techniques for the production, shaping, and 
control of nonsinusoidal wave forms. Fundamental circuits needed in pulse 
information systems, instrumentation, and computers. Mr. Barclay. 

EE 618. Radiation and Antennas 4-0 or 0-4 

Prerequisite: EE 615. 

Electromagnetic wave theory applied to antennas and antenna arrays. 
Calculation and measurement of directional characteristics and field in- 
tensity Mr. Barclay. 

EE 621. Vacuum Electron Devices 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 615. 

An intensive analytic study of the laws of electron emission and motion 
in electron tubes. Poisson's equation and conformal transformations are 
used to develop design criteria and formulae. Emission, space charge, beam 
formation and focussing, noise, tube parameters and ratings and construc- 
tion techniques. 

Mr. Barclay. 

EE 637. Circuit Analysis of Power Systems 3-0 

Prerequisite: EE 514. 

An advanced treatment of symmetrical components applied to unsym- 
metrical systems, and simultaneous faults. Mr. Stevenson. 

EE 638. Power System Stability 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 514. 

A study of the principal factors affecting stability and of the method 
of making stability calculations. Illustrations of studies made on actual 
power systems. Mr. Stevenson. 

EE 641. Advanced Digital Computer Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 520. 

93 



A study of the circuits and components of modern digital computers, 
including basic logic systems, codes, advanced systems of circuit logic, 
vacuum tube, transistor, and magnetic components. Memory devices, counters, 
converters, adders, accumulators, inputs, outputs, and computer control 
systems will be analyzed. Mr. Bell. 

EE 643. Advanced Electrical Measurements 2-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 414. 

A critical analysis of circuits used in electrical measurements, with spe- 
cial attention to such topics as balance convergence, effects of strays, 
sensitivity, the use of feedback in electronic devices, and automatic measur- 
ing systems. Mr. Hoadley. 

EE 645, 646. Advanced Electromagnetic Theory 3-3 

Prerequisites: EE 615 or PY 503; MA 541. 

A comprehensive study of electricity and magnetism, emphasizing dyna- 
mic field theory. Potential theory, boundary-value problems, electrostatics 
and magnetostatics, transients in continuous systems, electromagnetic the- 
ory of light. Mr. Mott. 

EE 650. Electrical Engineering Research Credits by 

arrangement 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in EE and approval of adviser. 

Graduate Staff. 

EE 661, 662. Special Studies in Electrical Engineering 3-3 

This course provides an opportunity for small groups of advanced grad- 
uate students to study, under the direction of qualified members of the 
professional staff, advanced topics in their special fields of interest. 

Graduate Staff. 

ENGINEERING HONORS 

The Engineering Honors Program is a contribution by the faculty of the 
School of Engineering to the development of undergraduate students who 
have demonstrated outstanding ability by the end of their sophomore 
year. Administered by a committee with representatives from each engi- 
neering department, the program has as a specific goal the encourage- 
ment of these students to continue their studies at the graduate level. 

Such students, during their two years of participation, follow individual 
programs of study selected to meet their needs and interests. The programs 
are made up around special courses developed for the Engineering Hon- 
ors program, which reflect the ability of these students to benefit from 
advanced treatments of concepts essential to engineering advances. The 
special courses include offex-ings from such fields as thermodynamics, 
mechanics, electromagnetic systems, mathematics, and analysis; they are 
characterized by rigorous development of concepts and principles and 
emphasize their interdisciplinary nature. 

E 500. Engineering Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisites: Selection for Honor's Group Program and Senior Standing 
or Special Consent of Instructor. 

94 



This course is to be an experience involving both analysis and synthesis 
and making use of fundamental principles of science (especially physics 
and mathematics) and of engineering. The engineering situations to be 
studied are expected to cut across departmental lines and to involve ele- 
ments of research. It is anticipated that sometimes two staff members or 
one staff member and an individual from industry (carefully chosen and 
briefed ahead of time) will participate in the class meetings; that the 
classes will be conducted by the discussion method; and that the studies 
will center around statements of engineering projects and the analysis and 
solution proffered by one or a team of students. 

Engineering Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ralph E. Fadum, Acting Head, Adolphus Mitchell. 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics offers graduate work leading 
to the Master of Science degree in the fields of fluid mechanics, stress analy- 
sis, elasticity, and other areas in theoretical and applied mechanics. Stu- 
dents proficient in these subjects are in demand as investigators in machine 
or structural design, as teachers in engineering schools and as research 
members of large industrial companies. 

Course for Advanced Undergraduates 

EM 430. Fluid Mechanics 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: EM 312 or EM 342. 

Fluid statics, kinematics, Bernoulli equation, momentum, free-surface flow, viscosity, 
pipe friction, drag on submerged bodies, lift, elastic wave propagation. 

Messrs. Clayton, Hardee, and Middleton. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EM 503. Theory of Linear Elasticity 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EM 321, MA 301. 

The differential equation approach employed in development of the 
equations representing the behavior of a linear elastic solid. The elastic 
problem formulated in two and three dimensions and various coordinate 
systems. Application of the theory illustrated through selected problems. 

Messrs. Douglas, Mitchell. 

EM 511. Theory of Plates and Shells 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EM 321, MA 301. 

A modern study of the theory of plates and shells. Topics are selected from 
problems involving membranes, folded plates, circular and rectangular 
slabs, domes, cylindrical shells and hyperbolic paraboloids. Solutions are 
obtained by both classical and modern numerical methods. Mr. Mitchell. 

EM 531. Hydraulic Machinery 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: EM 430. 

Theory of lift and application to propellers, fans; blade theory including 
generalized Bernoulli equation, angular impulse, and angular momentum; 



95 



forced and free vortex; impulse, reaction, and propeller turbines; positive 
displacement pumps, centrifugal pumps; propagation in pipes and surge 
tanks; fluid couplings and torque converters. Mr. Middleton. 

EM 551. Advanced Strength of Materials 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EM 312. 

Stresses and strains at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress 
concentration and fatigue; plasticity; inelastic, composite and curved 
beams; prestress; energy methods; shear deflections; buckling problems and 
column design; and membrane stresses in shells. 

Messrs. Hardee, Mitchell. 

EM 554. Theory of Vibrations 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EM 312 or 342; EM 321 or 343, MA 301. 

Free vibrations without damping; natural frequency; forced vibrations 
without damping; balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery; free 
vibrations with damping; forced vibrations with damping; virbration of 
systems with several degrees of freedom; shock and sound isolation; appli- 
cation of isolators. Mr. Mitchell. 

EM 556. Advanced Mechanics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EM 312. 

Virtual work; stability; balancing; elastic impact and waves; governors; 
LaGrangian equations of motion; three-dimensional dynamics of rigid 
body; gyroscopes; derivation from Kepler's laws of Newton's law of gravita- 
tion. Mr. Clayton. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

EM 601. Applied Analysis in Strength of Materials 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EM 551; MA 301. 

Advanced problems by energy methods. Difficult internal stress problems. 
Stresses in thin-webbed curved beans; stresses in square and curved knees 
of rigid frames; torsion in rolled profiles; design of beams for bending and 
torsion; equilibrium and compatibility in two dimensions; Airy's stress 
function; pure bending of plates; the plate equation; transverse and middle 
plane loads on plates. Beams on elastic foundations. Mr. Mitchell. 

EM 602. Theoretical and Applied Elasticity 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EM 321; MA 301. 

Buckling by torsion and flexure; lateral instability of beams and beam- 
columns; tapered and built-up columns; local failures; the four-moment 
theorem; stresses in circular and rectangular plates; stress concentrations. 
In the above topics, theory is developed and the resulting equation solved 
by classical or numerical methods. Results are compared with leading design 
specifications. Mr. Mitchell. 

EM 604. Theory of Plasticity 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EM 503. 

Development of the equations representing the plastic behavior of de- 
formable solids. Yield conditions and plastic stress-strain relations. Plane- 
strain theory, hyperbolic equations and slip line fields. Selected problems 
to illustrate the theory. Mr. Douglas. 

96 



EM 605. Research in Strength of Materials 3 to 6 

Special problems and investigations. Graduate Staff. 

EM 606. Research in Mechanical Vibrations 3 to 6 

Special problems and investigations. Graduate Staff. 

EM 607. Research in Fluid Mechanics 3 to 6 

Special problems and investigations. Graduate Staff. 

EM 608. Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EM 430. 

Potential motion; vortex theory; Navier-Stokes equations; theories of 
turbulence; theory of boundary layer; boundary separation; unsteady flow; 
vibrations of fluids. Mr. Clayton. 

EM 610. Engineering Mechanics Seminar 1-1 

Reports, discussions, and preparation of papers. Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Clyde F. Smith, Head, Walter M. Kulash, T. B. Mitchell. 

Professor Emeritus: B. B. Fulton. 

Associate Professors: Charles H. Brett, Frank E. Guthrie, Walter 

Joseph Mistric, Robert L. Rabb, David A. Young, Jr. 
Assistant Professors: William V. Campbell, Maurice H. Farrdsr, Robert 

T. Gast, William A. Stephen. 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in 
entomology. The work in entomology is well supported by strong depart- 
ments in chemistry, statistics, and the plant and animal sciences. Excellent 
facilities for advanced study and research are provided in the modern 
building designed for the use of the biological sciences. Equipment includes 
modern greenhouses, air conditioned laboratories with precision tempera- 
ture and humidity control, spray chambers, dust towers and low tempera- 
ture rooms. Facilities are provided to support research in insect toxicology, 
physiology, biology, ecology, and taxonomy. 

The collections of adult and immature insects plus the library facilities 
provide opportunities for unlimited work in insect taxonomy. Teaching per- 
sonnel has been so selected that well-trained individuals are available to 
teach the specialized courses in the various phases of advanced entomologi- 
cal work. 

Opportunities for employment of well-trained entomologists are plenti- 
ful and varied. Research and teaching opportunities exist in many state 
institutions. Federal agencies offer many positions in control, research, 
and regulatory work. Private industry is using more and more entomolo- 
gists in the development, production, control testing and sale of agricul- 
tural chemicals. Other opportunities in entomology as consultants in do- 
mestic or foreign service as well as in private business and sales are avail- 
able. Or, one can go into business for himself as a pest control operator or 
as an insecticide formulator. 



97 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENT 501-502. Insect Morphology 3-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312. 

Covers general morphology, external and internal, of the insects and 

their relatives. Ent. 501 will deal primarily with external morphology and 
Ent. 502 with internal morphology. (Given on odd years). Mr. Young. 

ENT 511. Systematic Entomology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312. 

A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, de- 
signed to acquaint the student with these groups and develop in the student 
some ability in the use of keys, descriptions, etc. (Given on odd years.) 

Mr. Young. 

ENT 522. Entomological Technique 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312. 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the various 
methods and techniques commonly employed in entomology, including a 
brief instruction in drawing and the photographic process. (Given on even 
years). Mr. Young. 

ENT 531. Insect Ecology and Behavior 3-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent. 

The influence of environmental factors on insect development, distribu- 
tion and behavior. (Given on even years.) Mr. Rabb. 

ENT 541, 542. Immature Insects 4-2 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent. 

541 is a study of the characteristics of the immature forms of the orders 
and principal families of insects. 542 is a detailed study of the immature 
forms of some special group of insects of the students' own choosing. 
(Given on even years.) Mr. Rabb. 

ENT 551, 552. Applied Entomology 3-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

An advanced course in which the principles of applied entomology are 
studied in respect to the major economic insect pests. Methods of deter- 
mining and examining insect damage, the economic importance of insects, 
and the chief economic pests of man, food, and fiber are studied as well as 
laws and regulations pertaining to insects and insecticides. (Given on odd 
years.) Mr. Kulash. 

ENT 561. Literature and History of Entomology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent. 

A general course intended to acquaint the student with literature prob- 
lems of the scientist, mechanics of the library and book classification, 
bibliographies of the zoological sciences, abstract journals, forms of bibli- 
ographies, forms of literature, preparation of scientific paper; taxonomic 
indexes and literature (with a historical background) and history of the 
development of zoological science from ancient to modern times with em- 
phasis on entomology. (Given on odd years.) Mr. Farrier. 

98 



ENT 571. Forest Entomology 3-0 

Prerequisite: EXT 301 or 312. 

A study of methods of identification of forest pests, the factors govern- 
ing their abundance, habits, and control. (Given on even years.) 

Mr. Kulash. 

EXT 582. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312. 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic arthro- 
pods of man, domestic and wild animals. (Given on odd years.) 

Mr. Harkema. 

EXT 590. Special Problems Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of the Instructor. 
Original research on special problems in entomology not related to a 

thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff. 

EXT 592. Acarology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 312. 

A systematic survey of the mites and ticks with emphasis on identifica- 
tion, biology and control of the more common and economic forms attacking 
material, plants and animals including man. (Given on even years.) 

Mr. Farrier. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ENT 601, 602. Principles of Taxonomy 3-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 511. 

A course introducing the methods and tools used in animal taxonomy, 
designed to promote a better understanding of taxonomic literature, and 
provide a foundation for taxonomic research. (Given on even years.) 

Mr. Young. 

ENT 611. Insect Physiology 4-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 312, ENT 502, CH 451, or equivalent. 
The course deals with the aspects of animal physiology related to in- 
sects. The functions of the various insect organs are discussed and how 
these systems are disrupted by economic poisons. Laboratory work includes 
the use of standard physiological apparatus with emphasis on methods 
rather than obtaining results. (Given on odd years.) Mr. Gast. 

ENT 621. Insect Toxicology 4-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 312, CH 426 or equivalent. 

The course deals with chemical and physical characteristics of insecti- 
cides and formulations and their effects on biological systems. Modes of 
action and mammalian toxicities are also discussed. Laboratory work in- 
volves insect culture work, formulating insecticides and evaluating the 
effectiveness of various materials. (Given on even years.) Mr. Gast. 

ENT 632. Advanced Systematic Entomology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 511. 

99 



A detailed study of some special insect group of the student's own 
choosing. Mr. Young. 

ENT 680. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields. 
Discussion of entomological topics selected and assigned by Seminar 
Chairman. Graduate Staff. 

ENT 690. Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields. 
Original research in connection with thesis problem in entomology. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF FIELD CROPS 

Professors: Paul Henry Harvey, Head, Dan Ulrich Gerstel, Walton 

Carlyle Gregory, Kenneth R. Keller, Glenn Charles Klingman, 

Roy Lee Loworn, Thurston J. Mann, Gordon Kennedy Mdddleton, 

Philip Arthur Miller, Robert Parker Moore. 
Associate Professors: Charles A. Brim, Douglas Scales Chamblee, 

Luther Shaw, Guy Langston Jones, Donald Loraine Thompson. 
Assistant Professors: Irving T. Carlson, Will A. Cope, John W. Dudley, 

Donald A. Emery, Harry Douglass Gross, Joshua A. Lee, Jack R. 

Mauney, Donald Edwin Moreland, Lyle L. Phillips, Robert P. 

Upchurch. 

The Department of Field Crops offers training leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following fields: Plant 
Breeding, Crop Production, Forage Crop Ecology, and Weed Control. 

Facilities — The Department of Field Crops is housed in Williams Hall 
which provides excellent facilities for graduate training. In addition to the 
office and laboratory space assigned each student, numerous other facilities 
are available for use in carrying on a program of graduate study. These in- 
clude special preparation rooms for soil and plant samples, cold storage 
facilities for plant material, air conditioned rooms for studying physical 
properties of the cotton fiber and of the tobacco leaf, and soil and plant 
analytical service laboratories. Greenhouses situated at the rear of Williams 
Hall are provided with benches, tables, ground beds, lights and other nec- 
essary equipment. A total of 16 farms are owned or operated by the State 
for research investigations. These farms are located throughout the State 
to include a wide variety of soil and climatic conditions needed for experi- 
ments in plant breeding and crop management. 

Supporting Departments — Strong supporting departments greatly in- 
crease the graduate students' opportunities for a broad and thorough train- 
ing. Included among those departments in which graduate students in Field 
Crops work cooperatively or obtain instructions are Botany, Chemistry, 
Genetics, Mathematics, Plant Pathology, Soils, and Statistics. 

Opportunities — In North Carolina, a state which derives 80 per cent of 
its agricultural income from farm crops, the opportunities for the well 
trained agronomist are exceedingly great. The recipients of advanced de- 
grees in Field Crops at North Carolina State College are found in positions 

100 



of leadership in research and education throughout the nation and the 
world where, through their technological training, they continue to contri- 
bute to the betterment of agriculture. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

FC 412. Advanced Pastures and Forage Crops 0-2 

Prerequisite: FC 312. 

Pasture species and management (cultural treatment) from an international viewpoint, 
and the inter-relationship of grazing animals on pasture development and management will 
be emphasized. Natural grassland areas and the place of special plant species will be con- 
sidered. Mr. Gross. 

FC 413. Plant Breeding 0-3 

Prerequisite: GN 411. 

The application of genetic principles to the improvement of economic plants, including 
discussions of the methods employed in the development and the perpetuation of desirable 
cones, varieties, and hybrids. Mr. Harvey. 

FC 414. Weeds and Their Control. 

Prerequisite : CH 203 or equivalent. 

Principles involved in cultural and chemical weed control. Discussions on chemistry of 
herbicides and the effects of the chemicals on the plant. Identification of common weeds and 
their seeds is given. Mr. Klingman. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

FC 511. Tobacco Technology 2-0 

Prerequisite: FC 311, BO 421 or equivalent. 

A study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest 
research problems and findings dealing with this important cash crop 
will be discussed. Mr. Jones. 

FC 521. Special Problems Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Admitted only with consent of instructor. 
Special problems in various phases of Field Crops. Problems may be 
selected or will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent 
and current research. Graduate Staff. 

FC 541 (GN 541 or HRT 541). Plant Breeding Methods 3-0 

Prerequisites: GR 512; recommended ST 511. 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles 
and concepts of inheritance. Messrs. Mann, Haynes. 

FC 542. (GN 542 or HRT 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 

2 in Summer Sessions 
Prerequisites: FC 541 or GN 541 or HRT 541. 

Laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breed- 
ing techniques and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Messrs. Haynes, Mann. 

Courses for Graduates Only* 

FC 611. Forage Crop Ecology 0-2 

Prerequisites: FC 412; BO 441. 

A study of the effect of environmental factors on the growth of forage 
crops. Attention will be given to methods of research in forage ecology. 

Mr. Chamblee. 



* Students are expected to consult the instructor before registration. 

101 



FC 612. Special Topics in Weed Control 0-2 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: FC 414, BO 403, BO 532 or 533. 

Detailed examination of current concepts and literature of weed control. 
The chemistry, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, microbiology, equipment, 
and techniques used in weed control research will be discussed. 

Graduate Staff. 

FC 631. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to agronomists reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed towards the Master's degree, but 
any number towards the Doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

FC 641. Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. 

A maximum of six credits is allowed towards the master's degree, but 
any number towards the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Professors: Richard Joseph Preston, Dean, James Samuel Bethel, Roy 
Merwin Carter, Clarence Earl Libby, T. Ewald Maki, Bruce J. 
Zobel. 

Associate Professors: Clarence Arthur Hart, William Dykstra Miller, 
Thomas 0. Perry, Alfred J. Stamm. 

Graduate work is forestry is offered through the Graduate School to 
meet the needs of two classes of students: 

1. The professional degree of Master of Forestry or Master of Wood 
Technology is designed for students desiring a broad knowledge of the 
several branches of forestry with emphasis upon advanced professional 
specialization. 

2. The degree of Master of Science is designed for students desiring to 
enter fields of research or teaching. This degree requires a sound fundamen- 
tal background in scientific courses and a carefully designed program of 
scientific research. A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language is 
required. 

3. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in several fields of 
forestry. 

Candidates for the Master's degree will fall under one of the following 
categories: 

1. Students with a bachelor's degree in forestry from a school of recog- 
nized standing. These students may secure the master's degree in one aca- 
demic year. 

2. Students with a bachelor's degree, other than in forestry, from a 
college, university, or scientific school of high standing. These students 
may secure the master's degree in two academic years provided they have 
the requirements in botany, chemistry, and mathematics required in the 
freshman and sophomore years of the curricula. Candidates for the degree 

102 



Master of Forestry or Master of Science in Forestry who do not hold an 
undergraduate degree in forestry must start their program with the sum- 
mer camp. 

3. Students not possessing a bachelor's degree may earn, through proper 
selection of courses, a Bachelor of Science degree in one of the forestry 
curricula at the end of the fourth year and a Master's degree in Forestry 
or Wood Technology at the end of the fifth year. 

A wide and rapidly expanding field of employment possibilities is avail- 
able in the Southeast to young men trained in forestry. Until recent years 
most job opportunities were with government agencies in managing our 
public forests, and this still constitutes a major source of employment. 
These agencies include state and federal forest services, extension serv- 
ices, and other groups such as the Soil Conservation Service and the Ten- 
nessee Valley Authority. 

In recent years job opportunities with private industries have expanded 
greatly. Increasing numbers of technically trained young men are entering 
a wide variety of professional positions in the fields of forest land manage- 
ment, watershed management, logging, sawmilling, veneer and plywood 
manufacturing, pulp and papermaking, kiln drying, wood preservation, 
plastics and other chemical derivatives of wood, and the manufacture of 
wood products such as furniture, dimension stock, and various prefabricated 
items. 

Graduate training offers tangible well-established values to young men 
of proven ability. The demand for men with advanced degrees in forestry 
has far exceeded the supply for many years. 

Graduate preparation is essential for the corps of specialists which are 
needed in many fields. Training through the Master's degree is almost a 
requirement for men entering college teaching and public or industrial 
research. State and federal agencies as well as forest industries are em- 
ploying research investigators at unprecedented levels. 

The continuing rapid expansion of southern forestry has resulted in a 
corresponding expansion in the need for trained men. As a general rule 
most employers will prefer a candidate with graduate training. While for- 
est industry and public forest administration does not normally require 
graduate training, increasing numbers of positions in these fields are being 
filled by men with advanced forestry degrees, particularly the Master's de- 
gree, and a man with the Master's degree has a distinct advantage over 
one without it. 

Kilgore Hall houses the administrative offices of the School of Forestry. 
The first floor houses portions of the Wood Products Laboratory and the 
second and third floors consist of laboratories, library, classrooms and 
offices. The Reuben B. Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory provides 
12,000 square feet of space for teaching and research in the production of 
pulp and paper. The Brandon P. Hodges Wood Products Laboratory pro- 
vides 18,000 square feet of space for pilot plant installations for product 
development work in the manufacture of lumber, veneer, plywood, particle 
board, laminated structures, furniture and other fabricated wood products. 

The School of Forestry now owns, or has access to, over 90,000 acres of 
forest land located in six tracts and representing major forest types in the 

103 



state. The largest tract is the Hofmann Forest on the coastal plain which 
is operated by the North Carolina Forestry Foundation for the benefit of the 
School of Forestry. The Hill Forest in Durham County, the Hope Valley 
Forest in Chatham County, the Goodwin Forest in Moore County, and the 
Schenck Memorial Forest in Wake County include representative types of 
the Piedmont area. The Wayah Recreational Area of the North Carolina 
National Forest near Franklin is located in a typical mountain forest, and 
facilities at this area, leased from the Government, supplement the pre- 
viously established forestry camps of the Hofmann and Hill Forests and 
provide the School with permanent, well-equipped, modern camps in each 
of the three major regions of the State. 

An extensive research program in the fields of wood products, genetics 
and management, sponsored by the Agricultural Experiment Station, the 
U. S. Forest Service, and the lumber, plywood, furniture, pulp and paper, 
and particle board industries provides broad opportunities for graduate 
research at the Master's and doctoral level. These programs provide re- 
search assistantships for graduate students whose backgrounds qualify 
them. Much valuable equipment is made available by industry for research 
in wood technology and it is accessible to the graduate student working in 
this area. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

FOR 401. Wood Preservation 0-2 

Factors causing wood deterioration ; preservative materials and treatments ; wood by- 
products from mill and forest waste. Mr. Carter. 

FOR 402. Foundation of Forest Management 2-0 

Prerequisites: FOR s274 or FOR 311. 

The integration of silviculture, forest measurements and economics in the management of 
woodland area. (Not open to students majoring in forest management). Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 403. Paper Technology Laboratory 0-3 

Development of various types of paper finishes with particular attention to stock prepara- 
tion, sizing, filling and coloring. The finished products are tested physically and chemically 
and evaluated from the standpoint of quality and in comparison with the commercial^ prod- 
ucts they are intended to duplicate. Mr. Hitchings. 

FOR 404. Management Plans 0-3 

Senior Camp 

Application of management, logging, silvicultural and utilization practices on assigned 
areas. Each student must make a forest survey of an individual area and submit a report. 

Staff. 

FOR 403. Forest Inventory 0-2 

Senior Camp. 

Practical field work in timber estimating and compilation of field data. Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 406. Forest Industries 0-2 

Senior Camp 

A field study of logging, milling and manufacturing with reports based on inspection 
trips. Staff. 

FOR 407. Field Silviculture 0-2 

Senior Camp 

Prerequisite: FOR 361. 

Studies of forest communities; dendrology of the coastal section of North Carolina; 
silviculture practices. Mr. Miller. 

FOR 411, 412. Pulp and Paper Mill Equipment 3-2 

Principles of operations, construction and design of process equipment employed in the 
pulp and paper industry. Mr. Cook. 

FOR 413. Paper Testing Laboratory 2-0 

Physical, chemical and microscopical examination of experimental and commercial papers 
and evaluation of the results in terms of the utility of the products tested. Mr. Hitchings. 



104 



FOR 422. Forest Products 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 201. CH 203 or 426. 

The source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured forest products other than 
lumber. Mr. Carter. 

FOR 423. Logging and Milling 3-0 

Timber harvesting and transportation methods, equipment and costs ; safety and supervi- 
sion ; manufacturing methods with regular and shortlog types of sawmills. Mr. Barefoot. 

FOR 432. Merchandising Forestry Products 2-0 

Principles and practices in the distribution and marketing of the products obtained from 

wood ; organization and operation of retail, concentration and wholesale outlets. Mr. Carter. 

FOR 434. Wood Operations I. 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, 302, EC 450 or 455. 

Organization of manufacturing plants producing wood products including company or- 
ganization, plant layout, production planning and control. Analysis of typical manufacturing 
operations in terms of processes, equipment, size and product specification. The organization 
and operation of Wood Products markets. Merchandising practices and procedures. 

Mr. Thomas. 

FOR 435. Wood Operations II. 0-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, 302, EC 450 or 455, MA 202 or 212. 

The application of the techniques of operations analysis to management decision making 
in the wood products field. Choice of products to manufacture. Allocation of production 
resources. Determining upon an inventory policy. Development of product distribution 
system. The elements of statistical quality control. Mr. Thomas. 

FOR 441. Mechanical Properties of Wood 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, 303. 

Strength and related properties of commercial woods ; standard A.S.T.M. strength tests ; 
toughness ; timber fastenings ; design of columns ; simple, laminated and box beams ; trusses 
and arches. Mr. Thomas. 

FOR 451. Paper Coloring Laboratory 2-0 

Evaluation and identification of dyestuffs and the development of color formulas for dye- 
ing pulp and paper. Mr. Libby. 

FOR 452. Forest Grazing 2-0 

Management of range areas, all grazing regions with special consideration of the south- 
east. Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 461. Paper Converting 1-0 

A survey of the principal processes by which paper and paper board are fabricated into 
the utilitarian products of everyday use. Mr. Libby. 

FOR 462. Artificial Forestation 0-2 

Production, collection, extraction, and storage of forest tree seeds ; nursery practice ; 
field methods of planting. Mr. Perry. 

FOR 463. Plant Inspection 0-1 

One week inspection trips covering representative manufacturers of pulp and paper and 
papermaking equipment. Mr. Libby. 

FOR 471. Pulp Technology Laboratory 4-0 

Preparation and evaluation of the several types of wood pulp. The influence of the 
various pulping and bleaching variables on pulp quality are studied experimentally and these 
data evaluated critically. Mr. Libby. 

FOR 472. Forest Policy and Administration 2-0 

Civil timber law, illustrated by court cases ; state and federal forest policy ; job-load 
analysis in national forest administration. Mr. Miller. 

FOR 431. Pulping Processes and Products 2-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or 426. 

Fiber manufacturing processes and equipment ; wall, insulation and container board prod- 
ucts ; manufacture of roofing felts ; pulp products manufacturing ; resin treated and specialty 
products, lignin and wood sugar products. 

FOR 482. Pulp and Paper Mill Management 0-2 

A survey of the economics of the pulp and paper industry is followed by a study of the 
work of the several departments of a paper mill organization and the functions of the 
executives who administer them. Mr. Cook. 

FOR 491, 492. Senior Problems. 1 to 4 

Staff 



105 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FOR 501. Forest Valuation 3-0 

Prerequisite: FOR 372. 

The theory and techniques of valuation of forest land, timber stands, and 
forest practices as investments and for appraisals of damages. Risks and 
hazards in forestry as they apply to forest investments, forest insurance- 
and forest taxation. Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 511. Silviculture 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 361, BO 421. 

The principles and application of intermediate and reproductive methods 
of cutting; controlled burning, silvicides, and other methods of hardwood 
control. The application of silvicultural methods in the forests of the United 
States. Mr. Miller. 

FOR 512. Forest Economics 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 372, EC 201. 

Economics and social value of forests; supply of, and demand for, forest 
products; land use; forestry as a private and public enterprise; economics 
of the forest industries. Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 513. Tropical Woods 0-2 

Prerequisite: FOR 203. 

Structure, identification, properties, characteristics and use of tropical 

woods, especially those used in plywood and furniture. Mr. Bethel. 

FOR 521, 522. Chemistry of Wood and Wood Products 3-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 201 or 202; CH 203, 215; PY 212. 
Fundamental chemistry and physics of wood and wood components; 

pulping principles; electrical and thermal properties. Mr. Stamm. 

FOR 531, 532. Forest Management 3-3 

Prerequisite: FOR 372. 

Management of timber lands for economic returns; the normal forest 
taken as the ideal; the application of regulation methods to the forest. 

Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 533. Advanced Wood Structure and Identification 2-0 

Prerequisite: FOR 202. 

Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the 
United States and some tropical woods; microscopic anatomical features 
and laboratory techniques. Mr. Hart. 

FOR 553. Forest Photogrammetry 0-2 

Prerequisite: FOR 372. 
Corequisite: FOR 531. 

Interpretation of aerial photographs, determination of density of timber 
stands and area mapping. Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 573. Methods of Research in Forestry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 
Research procedures, problem outlines, presentation of results; consider- 

106 





1 



I 




Weighing wasps fed radioisotopes. 



Field studies in cotton genetics. 



JSwte! 




ation of selected studies by forest research organizations; sample plot 
technique. Messrs. Bethel, Maki, Zobel. 

FOR 591. Forestry Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber 
manufacturing, pulp technology, or forest management. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

FOR 601. Advanced Forest Management Problems Credits Arranged 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
Directed studies in forest management. Graduate Staff. 

FOR 603. Technology of Wood Adhesives 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 425, 426; FOR 433. 

The fundamentals of adhesion as applied to wood to wood, and wood to 
metal bonding. Technology of adhesives. Preparation and use of organic 
adhesives. Testing of adhesives and evaluation of quality of adhesives 
and bonded joints. Mr. Bethel. 

FOR 604. Timber Physics 3-0 

Prerequisite: FOR 441. 

Density, specific gravity and moisture content variations affecting physi- 
cal properties; physics of drying at high and low temperatures; thermal, 
sound, light and electrical properties of wood. Mr. Bethel. 

FOR 605. Design and Control of Wood Processes 0-3 

Prerequisite: FOR 604. 

Design and control equipment for processing wood. Mr. Bethel. 

FOR 606. Wood Process Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 512, 604. 

Analysis of wood processes through the solution of comprehensive prob- 
lems involving the physics of temperature and moisture relations. 

Mr. Bethel. 

FOR 607. Advanced Quality Control 0-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 606, ST 515. 

Advanced statistical quality control as applied to wood processing. 

Mr. Bethel. 

FOR 611. Forest Genetics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: GN 411 and permission of instructor. 

Application of genetic principles to silviculture, management and pulp 
utilization. Emphasis is on variations in wild populations, on the bases for 
selection of desirable qualities and on fundamentals of controlled breeding. 

Mr. Zobel. 

FOR 621. Advanced Wood Technology Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

Selected research in wood technology problems of an advanced nature. 

Graduate Staff. 

107 



FOR 671. Problems in Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 
Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 

FOR 681. Graduate Seminar 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Forestry or closely allied fields. 
Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special 
problems, and outstanding publications in forestry and related fields. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF GENETICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Harold Frank Robinson, Head; Carey Hoyt Bostian, Daniel 

swartwood grosh, benjamin warfield smith, stanley george 

Stephens. 
Assistant Professors: Therese Marie Kelleher, Ken-ichi Kojima, Dale 

Frederick Matzixger, Lawrence Eugene Mettler, Robert Harry 

Moll. 

Associate Members of the Genetics Faculty 

Professors: Fred Derward Cochran, Columbus Clark Cockerham, Dan 
Ulrich Gerstel, Edward Walker Glazener, Walton Carlyle 
Gregory, Paul Henry Harvey, Frank Lloyd Haynes, Teddy 
Theodore Hebert, Guy Langston Jones, Kenneth Raymond Keller, 
James Edward Legates, Thurston Jefferson Mann, Gordon 
Kennedy Middleton, Philip Arthur Miller, Elmer Leon Moore, 
Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Carlos Frost Williams, Bruce John 
Zobel. 

Associate Professors: Jay Lawrence Apple, Ernest Oscar Beal, Charles 
Aloysius Brim, Richard Robert Nelson, Thomas E. Perry, Daniel 
Townsend Pope, Donald Loraine Thompson, Nash Nicks Winstead. 

Assistant Professors: William Lowry Blow, Irving Theodore Carlson, 
Emmett Urcey Dillard, Richard Gwyn, James Walker Hardin, 
Lyle Llewellyn Phillips. 

Graduate study under direction of the Genetics Faculty may enable the 
student to qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. A candidate for the Master's degree must acquire a thorough 
understanding of genetics and its relation to other biological disciplines 
and must present a thesis based upon his own research. In addition to a 
comprehensive knowledge of his field, a candidate for the doctorate must 
demonstrate his capacity for independent investigation and scholarship 
in genetics. 

At North Carolina State College there are no sharp divisions along 
departmental lines between theoretical and applied aspects of genetic re- 
search. The members and associate members of the Genetics Faculty are 
located in nine different departments of the School of Agriculture and 
the School of Forestry. They are studying an extremely wide range of 
genetic problems and are utilizing not only the "classic" laboratory material 

108 



(Drosophila, Habrobracon, mice) but also farm animals and agricultural 
and horticultural plants of the region. A student has therefore a wide 
choice of research problems in any of the following fields: cytology and 
cytogenetics, physiological and irradiation genetics, forest genetics, popu- 
lation genetics, and the application of quantitative genetics to breeding 
methodology. 

The offices and laboratories of the department are located in Gardner 
Hall with greenhouse facilities adjacent to the building. A genetics garden 
for use in the intensive research with plants and teaching functions is 
located three miles from the departmental offices. The departmental 
staff and the associate faculty members in Animal Industry, Field Crops, 
Horticulture, Poultry Science, Plant Pathology, Experimental Statistics, 
and Forestry are most fortunate in being able to draw upon the extensive 
facilities of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

GN 411. The Principles of Genetics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: BO 103 or ZO 103. 

An introductory course. The physical basis of inheritance ; genes as units of heredity 
and development; qualitative and quantitative aspects of genetic variation. Mr. Bostian. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
GN 503. (See AI 503. Genetic Improvement of Livestock.) 

GN 512. Genetics 4-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411. 

Intended for students desiring more thorough and detailed training in 
fundamental genetics with some attention to physiological aspects. (Students 
conduct individual laboratory problems). Mr. Grosch. 

GN 513. Cytogenetics I 4-0 

Prerequisite: GN 512 (or with consent of instructor). 

The chromosomes as vehicles of heredity. Mitosis and meiosis as bases 
of genetic stability and recombination. Structural and numerical aberrations 
and their effect upon the breeding systems of plants and animals. Inter- 
specific hybrids and polyploids. Lectures and laboratory. Mr. Gerstel. 

GN 520. (See PO 520. Poultry Breeding.) 

**GN 532. (See ZO 532. Biological Effects of Radiation). 

GN 540. Evolution 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411. 

The facts and theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes 
and consequences of organic diversity. Mr. Smith. 

GN 541. Plant Breeding Methods 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512 and either ST 511 or consent of instructor. 
Principles and methods of plant breeding. Messrs. Mann, Haynes. 

GN 542. (See FC 542 or HRT 542. Plant Breeding Field Procedures.) 



••Given 19G1-62 and alternate years. 

109 



Courses for Graduates Only 
GN 601. (See PO 601. Advanced Poultry Breeding.) 
GN 602. (See AI 602. Population Genetics in Animal Improvement.) 

*GN 607 & PP 607. Genetics of Fungi 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or equivalent and consent of instructor. 
Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on 

principles and theories that have evolved in recent developments. 

Mr. Nelson. 

GN 611. (See FOR 611. Forest Genetics.) 

**GN 614. Cytogenetics II 0-3 

Prerequisites: Gn 513 or graduate standing in botany or zoology. 

Laboratory and discussion: the cytogenetic analysis of natural and 
experimental material, plant and animal. Assigned exercises and student 
projects. The course provides the student with a working knowledge of 
cytogenetic procedure. Mr. Smith. 

GN 620. Genetic Concepts of Speciation 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512 and either GN 513 or GN 540. 

Review of current ideas on the mechanisms of the origin of species and 
the nature of species differentiation. Mr. Stephens. 

**GN 621. Genetics of Populations 0-3 

Prerequisite: GN 512; Recommended: GN 540. 

Review of the forces molding the genetic structure of natural and 
artificial populations of plants and animals. Mr. Mettler. 

GN 626. (See ST 626. Statistical Concepts in Genetics.) 

GN 633. Physiological Genetics 0-3 

Prerequisite: GN 512. 

Recent advances in physiological genetics. Attention will be directed 
to literature on the nature and action of genes, and to the interaction of 
heredity and environment in the expression of the characteristics of or- 
ganisms. Mr. Grosch. 

GN 641, 642. Colloquium in Genetics 2-2 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of instructor. 
Informal group discussion of prepared topics assigned by instructor. 

Graduate Staff. 

GN 651. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

GN 661. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Original research related to the student's thesis problem. 
A maximum of six credits for the Master's degree; by arrangement for 

the Doctorate. Graduate Staff. 



•Given 1900-61 and alternate years. 
•♦Given 19C1-62 and alternate years. 



110 



GN 671. Special Problems in Genetics 1 to 3-1 to 3 

Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing and consent of instructor. 
Special topics designed for additional experience and research training. 

Graduate staff. 



GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

See Department of Mineral Industries 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Preston Edsall, Head; Marvin L. Brown, Jr., Stuart Noblin. 
Associate Professor: Abraham Holtzman. 

Assistant Professors: Burton F. Beers, William J. Block, Ladislas F. 
Reitzer. 

No graduate degrees are offered in history or political science at State 
College. Graduate programs leading to advanced degrees in this field are 
offered at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The courses 
listed below are eligible for graduate credit when they form a part of 
an approved graduate program in other departments, and work in history 
and political science may serve as a minor field. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

HI 401. Russian History 3-0 

This course presents the major trends in Russian social, political, economic, and cultural 

history, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. USSR policy is studied in 
relation to the full sweep of Russian history. 

HI 402. Asia and the West 0-3 

A history of Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present with emphasis on Asian 
nationalism and conflict with the imperial powers. 

HI 415. International Relations since 1S70 0-3 

A study of the relations between the major countries of the world since 1870. In addition 
to the history of actual diplomatic relations, crises, and settlements, attention is given to 
the causes of the various international crises. The course also includes study of the devel- 
opment of international organizations and the various points of conflict between interna- 
tional law and organization and the sovereignty of independent governments. 

HI 422. History of Science 3-0 

_A study of the evolution of science from antiquity to the present with particular attention 
given to the impact of scientific thought upon selected aspects of western civilization. The 
course provides a broad perspective of scientific progress and shows the interrelationship of 
science ar.d major historical developments. 

HI, PS, EC, 461. The Soviet Union 0-3 

An analysis of the structure and function of the major Soviet economic, political, and 
social institutions with special stress on the historical roots and continuity of Russian 
civilization. The course is presented in three equal phases of approximately five weeks 
each, covering Russian history, Soviet government, and Soviet economy. 

PS 401. American Parties and Pressure Groups 3 or 3 

After a brief survey of those features of American government essential to an under- 
standing of the political process, the course proceeds to examine the American electorate 
and public opinion and devotes its major attention to the nature, organization, and pro- 
grams of pressure groups and political parties and to their efforts to direct opinion, gain 
control of government, and shape public policy. Special attention is given to party organiza- 
tion and pressure group activity at the governmental level and to recent proposals to im- 
prove the political party as an instrument of responsible government. 

PS 406. Problems in North Carolina Government. 0-2 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or an acceptable substitute. 

Selected problems arising from the operation of the legislative, administrative, and judicial 
machinery in North Carolina. In addition to acquiring a comprehensive view of these 
problems each student will make an intensive study of a special phase of one of them. 

Ill 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HI 534. (RS 534). Farmers' Movements 0-3 

Prerequisite: 3 credits in American history, American government, so- 
ciology or a related social science. 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United 
States and Canada principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the 
Farmers' Alliance, the Populist revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm 
Bureau, the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, cooperative market- 
ing, government programs, and present problems. Mr. Noblin. 

PS 501. Modern Political Theory 3-0 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the state and its relationship to individuals and groups, 
approached through the reading of selected passages from the works of 
outstanding political philosophers from the sixteenth century to the pres- 
ent. Mr. Holtzman. 

PS 502. Public Administration 0-3 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or PS 202 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the principles and problems of governmental adminis- 
tration. Topics include the characteristics of public management at all 
levels; the relationship of administration and the establishment of govern- 
mental policies; the principles of management and the organizational 
arrangements of today's highly specialized governmental units; the role 
of leadership and its processes; the problems and techniques of communi- 
cation, coordination, and public relations; the management of personnel 
and finances; and the problems of securing administrative responsibility 
in a democratic society. The course also uses the case studies in public 
policy and administration which have been published by the Inter-University 
Case Program. Mr. Block. 

PS 503. International Organization 2-0 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the evolving machinery and techniques of international 
organization in the present century with particular emphasis on recent 
developments. The actual operation of international organization will be 
illustrated by the study of selected current international problems. 

Graduate Staff. 

PS 510 (EC 510) Public Finance 0-3 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree- 
granting school. 

A survey of the theories and practices of goverment taxing, spending, 
and borrowing, including inter-governmental relationships and administra- 
tive practices and problems. Mr. Block. 

PS 512. American Constitutional Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or an acceptable substitute. 

Basic constitutional doctrines, including fundamental law, judicial re- 
view, individual rights and political privileges, and national and state power. 
Special attention is given to the application of these doctrines to the 

112 



regulation of business, agriculture, and labor and to the rights safeguarded 
by the First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. 

Mr. Edsall. 

Course for Graduates Only 

PS 620. Problems in Political Science 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. 

An independent advanced research course in selected problems of 
government and politics. The problems will be chosen in accordance with 
the needs and desires of the students registered for the course. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE 
Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Fred Derward Cochran, Head; John Lincoln Etchells, 
Monroe Evans Gardner, John Bernard Gartner, Frank Lloyd 
Haynes, Jr., John Mitchell Jenkins, Jr., Ivan Dunlavy Jones, 
Carlos Frost Williams. 

Associate Professors: Maurice Wilbur Hoover, Clarence Leslie Mc- 
Combs, Daniel Townsend Pope, Davdd Rudger Walker. 

Assistant Professors: Walter Elmer Ballinger, Conrad Henry Miller, 
Robert Johnson Schramm, Jr. 

The Department of Horticulture offers the Master of Science degree and 
the professional degree, Master of Horticulture. The requirements for each 
of these degrees are outlined in an earlier section of this catalog. Evidence 
of high scholastic achievement in the basic biological sciences is particu- 
larly desirable for students who expect to study for the Master of Science 
degree in Horticulture. 

The department now has excellent physical facilities for training stu- 
dents in Horticulture. The building, completed in 1953, houses Horticulture 
and Forestry. It contains adequate office, classroom, and laboratory space 
and the equipment necessary for a well rounded graduate program. A 
greenhouse range is available which contains ten separate 24' x 30' com- 
partments especially designed for research. This range and others make 
available for research and teaching approximately 25,000 sq. ft. of glass. 
A modern and well equipped processing laboratory is located on the first 
floor of the building with adjoining analytical laboratories. This provides 
facilities for research and teaching in the preservation of foods by quick- 
freezing, canning and other methods. Cold storage compartments in the 
building make possible extensive investigations dealing with the storage 
and handling of fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. The department has 
six analytical laboratories and a cytological laboratory. Out-field research 
problems are conducted on the student laboratory farm at Raleigh and at 
ten of the research stations located in the various geographical sections of 
the State. 

The opportunities for employment after advanced training are many and 
varied: teaching and research in state and privately endowed educational 



113 



institutions; research positions with U.S.D.A., both foreign and domestic; 
extension specialists and county agents; research and promotional work 
with food, chemical, and seed concerns; orchard, nursery and greenhouse 
supervisors; food technologists and inspectors. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

HRT 421. Fruit Production 3-0 

Prerequisite: SOI 200 (or concurrently) 

Methods of production of the principal tree and small fruits. This is designed to give 
an understanding of the practices involved in fruit production. Messrs. Correll and Walker. 

HRT 432. Vegetable Production 3-3 

Prerequisite: SOI 200 (or concurrently) 

Soil preparation, seedage, plant production, fertilization, irrigation and general culture 
of vegetable crops. Messrs. Miller and McCombs. 

**HRT 441. Commercial Floriculture 3-0 

Prerequisite: SOI 200 (or concurrently) 

Greenhouse construction, heating and management. Mr. Randall. 

**HRT 442. Commercial Floriculture 0-3 

Prerequisite: HRT 441. 

Botanical characters, importance, propagation, culture and preparation for market of the 

floral crops commonly grown in the greenhouse. Mr. Randall. 

HRT 451. Principles of Fruit and Vegetable Processing 3-0 

Principles and methods involved in the preservation of fruits and vegetables, with 
emphasis placed on canning and freezing. Mr. Jones. 

HRT 462. Grading and Inspection of Processed Fruits and Vegetables 0-2 

Prerequisite: Registration by permission of the instructor. 

Methods of inspection, grading and critical appraisal for quality of the principal fruit 
and vegetable produces. Mr. Hoover. 

HRT 481. Breeding of Horticultural Plants 

Prerequisite: GN 411. 

The application of genetics and plant breeding to the improvement of horticultural 
crops. Messrs. Galletta and Henderson. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HRT 501. Horticultural Problems Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: BO 421 or GN 411 and permission of instructor 
Investigation of a problem in horticulture, each student selecting 
a problem and conducting the investigations under the direction of the 
instructor. The problem may last one or two semesters. Credits will be 
determined by the nature of the problem, not to exceed a total of 4 hours. 

Graduate Staff. 

**HRT 512. Handling and Storage of Ornamental Plants 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 421. 

A study of the handling and storage of ornamental plants and plant 
parts. Consideration will be given to the chemical and physiological changes 
occurring in storage, storage facilities, materials and methods for handling 
and storing these products. Mr. Gartner. 

HRT 521, 522. Technology of Fruit and Vegetable Products 3-3 

Prerequisite: BO 312 (or concurrently). 

Comprehensive treatment of principals and methods of preservation 
of fruits and vegetables, including small scale plant operation and commer- 
cial processing plant visits. Mr. Jones. 



•♦Offered 1960-61 and in alternate years. 

114 



*HRT 532. Advanced Fruit Production 0-4 

Prerequisites: HRT 421, BO 421 (or concurrently) 

A comprehensive study of principles involved in production of tree 
and small fruits. Mr. Walker. 

HRT 541. Plant Breeding Methods 
See GN 541 

*HRT 562. Handling and Storage of Fruits and Vegetables 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 421. 

The chemical and physiological changes occurring during handling 
and storage of fruits and vegetables. Consideration will also be given to 
facilities for handling and storage. Mr. McCombs. 

**HRT 571. Advanced Vegetable Crops 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 421 (or concurrently) and consent of instructor. 
A study of the origin, distribution, botanical relationships, and basic 
principles of production of the major vegetable crops. Mr. Cochran. 

HRT 581. Senior Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Senior in Horticulture 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and 
special problems in horticulture and related fields. Mr. Gardner. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

HRT 601. Advanced Olericulture 3-0 

Prerequisite: HRT 571. 

A study of a specific technical problem, involving original investigations, 
including a survey of pertinent literature, or an exhaustive study of litera- 
ture on a given subject or plant. Mr. Cochran. 

HRT 602. Advanced Ornamental Horticulture 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 421, HRT 422. 

A study of specific problems in ornamental crops, either through a 
study of pertinent literature or by an original investigation. 

Mr. Gartner. 

HRT 612. Advanced Fruit and Vegetable Processing 0-3 

Prerequisite: HRT 522 or equivalent. 

Critical study of certain processing methods as applied to fruit and 

vegetable preservation. Mr. Jones. 

**HRT 621. Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 421, ST 511 (or concurrently). 

Methods and techniques in the field of horticulture and their application 
in the solution of current problems. Critical evaluation of published papers 
reporting results of horticultural experiments. Methods of compiling data 
and presenting results. Mr. Cochran. 

HRT 632. Advanced Pomology 0-3 

Prerequisite: HRT 532. 



•Offered 1961-62 and in alternate years. 
•♦Offered 1960-61 and in alternate years. 



115 



A critical study of specific problems in fruit crops including current 
literature. Mr. Walker. 

HRT 641. Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture — consent of instructor. 
Original research on specific problems in fruits, vegetables, or ornamental 

crops, or in fruit and vegetable processing. Thesis prepared should be 

worthy of publication. 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master of Science 

degree; no limitation on credits in Doctorate program. 

Graduate Staff. 

HRT 651. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture. 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and 
special problems in Horticulture and related fields. Presentation of one 
or more papers each semester is required. Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

AND 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
See Education 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
Gaduate Faculty: 
Professors: Clifton A. Anderson, Head, Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., 

Ernest Sigurd Johnson. 
Associate Professor: Robert W. Llewellyn. 
Visiting Lecturers: John S. Little, Rudolph Willard. 

Industrial Engineering is a relatively new branch of engineering that 
combines a knowledge of how industry is organized and operated with a 
basic training in the fundamentals of engineering. Graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science degree in Industrial Engineering is offered in the 
department. The rapid development of industry in North Carolina in recent 
years has opened many opportunities for men trained in plant operation 
and management. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

IE 401. Industrial Engineering Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisite: IE 304. MA 401, MA 405, ST 362. 

An introductory course in some of the more recently developed operations research 
techniques; applications of analysis of variance, multiple correlation and other statistical 
methods, queueing theory, linear programming ; graphical methods of solutions ; information 
theory and servomechanisms in Industrial Engineering. A balance will be sought between 
theory and practical applications. 

IE 402. Industrial Engineering Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: IE 401. 
Continuation of IE 401. 

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IE 408. Production Control 3-0 

Planning, scheduling and dispatching of production in manufacturing operations ; con- 
version of sales requirements into production orders : construction of production budgets 
and their relation to labor, materials and machines ; laboratory project involving the 
development and operation of the production control system of a typical plant. 

IE 425. Sales and Distribution Methods 0-2 

An analysis of the distribution of industrial and consumer products ; the effect of in- 
creased productivity on sales and distribution channels ; development and marketing of 
new products ; merchandising and packaging. Sales training and sales engineering programs. 

IE 430. Job Evaluation and Wage Incentives 0-3 

Job analysis, classification and specification. Grading, ranking, factor comparison and 
point systems of job evaluation in determining equitable rates for job content. Wages surveys 
and merit rating. Utilization of time standards in design, installation and operation of 
financial incentive plans. Comparison of various wage and salary plans. Effect of wage 
payment methods on industrial relations practices. 

IE 443. Quality Control 3-0 

Economic balance between cost of quality and value of quality, and techniques for 
accomplishing this balance. Organization for, specification and utilization of quality con- 
trols. Statistical theory and analyses as applied to sampling, control charts, tolerance de- 
termination, acceptance procedures and control of production. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

IE 515. Process Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 401, 443. 

The technical process of translating product design into a manufacturing 
program. The application of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, 
methods, standards, costs and control functions of manufacturing. Labora- 
tory problems covering producer and consumer products. 

Mr. Little. 

IE 517. Automatic Processes 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 401, 443. 

Principles and methods for automatic processing. The design of product, 
process, and controls. Economic, physical, and sociological effects of 
automation. Messrs. Anderson and Johnson. 

IE 521. Control Systems and Data Processing 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 401. 

This course is designed to train the student in the problem and techni- 
ques required for systematic control of the production process and the 
business enterprise. This includes training in the determination of control 
factors, the collection and recording of data, and the processing, evaluation 
and use of data. The course will illustrate the applications and use of 
data processing equipment and information machines in industrial processes. 
Case problems will be used extensively. Mr. Llewellyn. 

IE 531. Quantitative Job Evaluation Methods 0-3 

Prerequisite: IE 401. 

A study of statistical and mathematical methods of testing and designing 
job evaluation plans. Ranking, contingency, and analysis of variance 
methods of testing plans and rating performance. Multiple regression and 
linear programming methods of designing plans. Mr. Llewellyn. 

IE 543. Standard Data 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 361 or ST 515, one course in motion and time study. 
Theory and practice in developing standard data from stopwatch 

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observations and predetermined time data; methods of calculating standards 
from data; application of standard data in cost control, production planning 
and scheduling, and wage incentives. Mr. Anderson. 

IE 551. Standard Costs for Manufacturing 0-3 

Prerequisites: One course in accounting and one course in motion and 
time study. 

The development, application and use of standard costs as a management 
tool; use of industrial engineering techniques in establishing standard 
costs for labor, material and overhead. Analysis of variances and setting 
of budgets. Measures of management performance. Mr. Willard. 

IE 581. Project Work 2 to 6-2 to 6 

Investigation and report on an assigned problem for students enrolled 
in the fifth-year curriculum in Industrial Engineering. Graduate Staff. 

Courses For Graduates Only 

IE 621. Inventory Control Methods 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 402, IE 521, MA 511. 

A study of inventory policy with respect to reorder sizes, minimum points 
and production schedules. Simple inventory models, models with restrictions, 
price breaks, price changes, analysis of slow-moving inventories. Introduc- 
tion to the smoothing problem in continuous manufacturing. Applications 
of linear and dynamic programming and zero-sum game theory. 

Mr. Llewellyn. 

IE 651. Special Studies in Industrial Engineering Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups 
of students to take on studies of special areas in Industrial Engineering 
which fit into their particular program and which may not be covered by 
existing industrial engineering graduate level courses. The work would be 
directed by a qualified staff member who had particular interest in the 
area covered by the problem. Such problems may require individual research 
and initiative in the application of industrial engineering training to new 
areas or fields. Graduate Staff. 

IE 671. Seminar 1-1 

Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for graduate 

students. Case analyses and reports. Mr. Anderson. 

IE 691. Industrial Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Graduate research in Industrial Engineering for thesis credit. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: John Wesley Cell, Head, Roberts Cozart Bullock, John 
Montgomery Clarkson, Walter Joel Harrington, Jack Levine, 
Carey Gardner Mumford, Howard M. Nahikian, Hubert Vern Park, 
Lowell Sheridan Winton. 

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a -o 

T3 C 




Graduate students in Applied Mathematics operating the GEDA Analog 
Computer. 




Graduate students and staff in Applied Mathematics at the IBM 650 Digital 
Computer. 



Associate Professors: George Charles Caldwell, Charles J. Standish, 
Raimond Aldrich Struble. 

The Department of Mathematics offers a graduate program leading to 
the Master of Science degree in applied mathematics. A knowledge of ad- 
vanced mathematics has become increasingly essential for graduate study 
in all of the disciplines offered in any technological branch of a university. 
This is particularly true in the several fields of engineering, physics, statis- 
tics and the biological sciences; and is becoming increasingly so in eco- 
nomics and phychology. 

Mathematicians are in great demand (and short supply) as college 
teachers, as members of mathematics groups working with large electronic 
computers, and as members of research teams in industrial or government 
laboratories. The demands of an expanding industry in North Carolina 
and especially of the Research Triangle will necessitate the employment 
of many mathematicians in this state. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MA 403. Fundamental Concepts of Algebra 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212. 

Integers; integral domains; rational numbers; fields, rings, groups; vectors and vector 
spaces; linear transformation; matrices. Boalean algebra. 

MA 404. Fundamental Concepts of Geometry 3-0 

Prerequisite : MA 202 or MA 212. 

Foundation of geometry ; laws of logic ; affine geometry ; geometric transformations ; 
homogeneous coordinates ; comparison of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. 

MA 405. Introduction to Determinants and Matrices 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212. 

Properties of determinants; theorems of Laplace and Jacobi ; systems of linear equations. 
Elementary operations with matrices ; inverse, rank, characteristic roots and eigenvectors. 
Introduction to algebraic forms. 

MA 411. Introduction to Applied Mathematics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301. 

Infinite series, introduction to Fourier series, special functions defined by integrals, line 
and multiple integrals, partial differentiation, and a brief treatment of vector analysis. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MA 501. Numerical Analysis I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Numerical solution of equations, introduction to theory of random errors, 
least squares and curve fitting, finite-difference tables and the theory of 
interpolation, numerical integration, numerical differentiation, and elements 
of difference calculus. Some methods will be presented for use in hand 
calculations and others for digital computer solution. 

Graduate Staff. 

MA 502. Numerical Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 501, MA 511 

Summation of series, numerical solution of ordinary differential equa- 
tions, solution of systems of linear equations, and numerical solution of 
partial differential equations. Presentation of sources of error in numerical 
computation and brief analyses will be included in the various numerical 
procedures. Graduate Staff. 

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MA 511. Advanced Calculus I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and B-average in Mathematics. 

This two-semester sequence, MA 511 and MA 512, is intended as founda- 
tion mathematics for graduate study in Engineering, Physics, or Applied 
Mathematics. 

Number system, sequences, limits, continuity; derivatives, differentials. 
Functions of several variables, limits and continuity, partial differentiation, 
Jacobians; directional derivatives. Riemann integral, multiple integrals, 
Green's theorem. Graduate Staff. 

MA 512. Advanced Calculus II 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 511. 

Line integrals and applications. Infinite series, review of convergence 
tests, uniform convergence, powers series and applications. Fourier series. 
Improper integrals. Graduate Staff. 

MA 514. Boundary Value Problems 3-0 

Co-requisite: MA 512. 

Ordinary homogeneous and non-homogeneous differential equations with 
boundary values; elements of partial differential equations; applications of 
Fourier series and other methods to the solutions of certain boundary value 
problems in partial differential equations; harmonic functions. 

Mr. Mumford. 

MA 521. Advanced Geometry 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 202, MA 405. 

Coordinates in space; direction angles and cosines; planes, lines, points; 
matrices; surfaces and curves; quadric surfaces; transformation; analysis 
of general equation of degree 2; matrix algebra and its applications; in- 
troduction to algebraic geometry. Messrs. Clarkson and Nahikian. 

MA 522. Theory of Probability 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 301. 

Definitions, discrete and continuous sample spaces, combinatorial analysis, 
Stirling's formula, simple occupancy and ordering problems, conditional 
probability, repeated trials, compound experiments, Bayes' theorem, bi- 
nomial, Poisson and normal distributions, the probability integral, random 
variables, expectation. Messrs. Clarkson and Levine. 

MA 532. Differential Equations II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and "B" average in mathematics. 

Solution of second order linear equations with variable coefficients; exact 
equations; Green's functions; singular points and series solutions; Bessel 
functions, Legendre polynomials, and other special functions defined by 
ordinary differential equations; approximate methods; introduction to par- 
tial differential equations. Graduate Staff. 

MA 533. History of Mathematics 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212. 

Evolution of the number system; trends in the development of modern 
mathematics; lives and contributions of oustanding mathematicians. 

Mr. Nolstad. 

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MA 535. An Introduction to Computers. 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and either 405 or one 500 level course. 

The elements of number systems and commonly used machine codes; 
fundamental coding and programming techniques for the IBM 650. Selected 
problems are subjected to numerical and error analysis and solved on the 
IBM 650. The elements of the theory and applications of the analog com- 
puter, solutions of certain differential systems on the Donner analog 
computer. Messrs. Caldwell and Wilson. 

MA 541. Vector Analysis 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and either 405 or one 500-level course. 

The algebra of vectors and dyadics; elementary space geometry in vector 
form; scalar and vector differentiation of scalar, vector and dyadic func- 
tions; curvilinear coordinates; line, surface, and volume integrals; integral 
transformations; applications. Graduate Staff. 

MA 543. Elementary Complex Variable Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 511 or MA 532. 

Operations with complex numbers; derivatives, analytic functions, in- 
tegrals, definitions and properties of elementary functions, multiple-value 
functions, power series, residue theory and applications, conformal map- 
ping. Messrs. Bullock, Mumford, Winton. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MA 602. Partial Differential Equations 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 512. 

Partial differentiation, functional dependence, envelopes, eliminants, 
Lagrange's equation, general and complete integrals, non-linear equations 
of first and higher orders; Fourier series with applications to problems in 
vibrations, heat and fluid flow, electricity; boundary value problems. 

Mr. Mumford. 

MA 605. Non-linear Differential Equations 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532. 

Non-linear differential equations associated with important physical 
systems; contrasts with linear system; use of phase plane diagrams and 
other geometrical methods of analysis, approximate solutions by perturba- 
tion, Fourier series, slow variations of amplitude and phase, linearized 
equations, and computer methods; study of limit cycles an stability. 

Mr. Struble. 

MA 611. Complex Variable Theory and Applications I 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 512. 

Elementary functions; analytic functions and Cauchy-Riemann equations; 
conformal mapping and applications; Taylor and Laurent series; contour 
integration and residue theory; the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. 

Messrs. Bullock and Mumford. 

MA 612. Complex Variable Theory and Applications II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 611. 

Conformal mapping and applications to flow phenomena; multiple-valued 
functions and Riemann surfaces; further applications of residue theory; 

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analytic continuation; infinite series and asymptotic expansions; elliptic 
functions and other special functions in the complex domain; structure 
of functions. Mr. Bullock. 

MA 615. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I Alternate Years 

Prerequisite: MA 512. 3-0 

Sets and spaces; continuity and differentiability of real functions. 

Messrs. Harrington and Struble. 

MA 616. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II Alternate Years 

Prerequisite: MA 615. 0-3 

Measure, measurable sets and functions, theory of Lebesque integration. 

Messrs. Harrington and Struble. 

MA 621. Introduction to Modern Abstract Algebra 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 512. 

A study of the abstract structure and properties of groups, rings and 
ideals, and fields. Messrs. Nahikian and Park. 

MA 622. Vector Spaces and Matrices 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 511. 

Introduction to matrices; vector spaces; equivalence, rank, inverse of 
matrices; determinants; congruence; quadratic forms; polynomials over a 
field; similarity; characteristic roots. Messrs. Nahikian and Park. 

MA 625. Introduction to Differential Geometry Alternate 

Prerequisite: MA 512. Summers 3 

Theory of curves and surfaces in 3-dimensional Euclidean space with 
special reference to those properties invariant under the rigid body mo- 
tions. Messrs. Levine and Winton. 

MA 632. Operational Mathematics I 3-0 

Corequisite: MA 543 or MA 611. 

Laplace transform with theory and application to problems in ordinary 
and partial differential equations arising from engineering and physics 
problems; Fourier integral and Fourier transforms and applications. 

Mr. Cell. 

MA 633. Operational Mathematics II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 632. 

Extended development of the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their 
uses in the solution of problems in ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions and in difference equations; Sturm-Liouville systems; advanced theory 
in ordinary and partial differential equations; other infinite and finite trans- 
forms and their applications. Mr. Cell. 

MA 635. Mathemetics of Computers 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 502, MA 512, 535. 

Corequisite: MA 405 or MA 622. 

The development of methods for the solution of selected problems involv- 
ing matrices; integral rational equations; ordinary and partial differ- 
ential equations. Particular attention is paid to the question of convergence 
and stability; examples solved on the IBM 650. Mr. Caldwell. 

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MA 641. Calculus of Variations Alternate Summers 3 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The simplest problem of the calculus of variations in detail; variable 
endpoints; iso-perimetric problems; Hamilton's principle; least action princi- 
ple; introduction to the theory of linear integral equations of the Volterra 
and Fredholm types. Mr. Winton. 

MA 651. Expansion of Functions Alternate Summers 3 

Prerequisites: MA 611, 633 or equivalent. 

Expansion of functions of one or more variables in Taylor series; asymp- 
totic series, infinite products, partial fractions, continued fractions, series 
of orthogonal functions; applications in ordinary partial differential equa- 
tions, difference equations and integral equations. 

Messrs. Cell and Harrington. 

MA 661. Tensor Analysis I 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 512, 541. 

Recommended (but not required) MA 521, 602, 622. 

The basic theory; tensor algebra, tensor calculus; invariant theory; 
quadratic differential forms; covariant differentiation, curvature tensor; 
geometric applications, Riemannian spaces, parallelism, geodesies, normal 
coordinates; generalized vector analysis; physical applications: dynamics, 
Lagrange's equations, generalized coordinates; the geometry of dynamics; 
kinematic and action line elements, holonomic and non-holonomic systems; 
configuration space, dynamics in n-dimensions. Mr. Levine. 

MA 662. Tensor Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 661. 

Continuation of physical applications. Elasticity: finite strains, equations 
of compatibility, strain invariants, stress tensor, equations of motion, 
generalized Hooke's law, isotropic stress-strain relations; hydrodynamics: 
perfect fluids, viscous fluid, viscosity tensor, equations of motion; electro- 
magnetic theory: Maxwell's equations, plane waves, stress-energy tensor. 

Mr. Levine. 

MA 681. Special Topics in Analysis 3-3 

MA 683. Special Topics in Algebra 3-3 

MA 685. Special Topics in Numerical Analysis 3-3 

MA 687. Special Topics in Geometry 3-3 

MA 689. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics 3-3 

The above courses, MA 681-MA 689, afford opportunities for graduate 
students to study advanced topics in mathematics under the direction of 
members of the graduate staff. These will on occasion consist of one of sev- 
eral areas such as, for example, Advanced Theory of Partial Differential 
Equations, Topology, Mathematics of Plasticity or of Viscoelasticity, Mathe- 
matics of Orbital Mechanics. 

MA 691. Research in Mathematics Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of adviser. 
Individual research in the field of Mathematics. 

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DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: John Francis Lee, Head, Patrick Hill McDonald, Jr., 
Graduate Administrator, Norval White Conner, Jesse Seymour 
Doolittle, Karl P. Hanson, Thomas F. Irvine, jr., Richard Bennett 
Knight, Robert McLean Pinkerton, Robert Barton Rice*, James 
Woodburn. 

Associate Professors: Gennaro L. Goglia, Edgar Lee Harrisberger, John 
Kerr Whitfield. 

Assistant Professors: Thomas Benson Ledbetter, William Thomas 
Snyder. 

Instructor: Huseyin C. Topakoglu. 

The Master of Science degree is offered in Mechanical Engineering. En- 
trance to the various programs in the Department is normally based upon 
an accredited baccalaureate degree in engineering. In addition, the general 
admission requirements of the Graduate School must be fulfilled. 

At present, the major emphases in graduate study are the thermal 
sciences, including classical thermodynamics, heat transfer and transport 
phenomena, statistical thermodynamics; gas dynamics (aerothermo- 
chemistry, aerothermodynamics) and the mechanical sciences, such as 
principles of fluid motion, dynamics of compressible flow and viscous fluids, 
vibrations, mechanical transients, stress analysis, and applied mechanics; 
the aero and space sciences of aerodynamics, propulsion, and aeroelasticity. 

The professional technological interests of the Department are repre- 
sented by graduate courses in nuclear power plants, steam and gas turbines, 
refrigeration, internal combustion engines, lubrication, mechanics of ma- 
chinery, and machine design analysis and synthesis. 

Graduate programs in Mechanical Engineering normally include sub- 
stantial work in the basic sciences of mathematics and physics, and study 
in related engineering departments is encouraged. 

The fundamental objective of graduate study in this field is to prepare 
the student for leadership in the various categories of research, teaching 
and design. To this end, the graduate student is placed in intimate contact 
and association with the graduate faculty who conduct individual research. 
Participation in a research project as a research assistant or employment as 
a teaching assistant is regarded as significant experience during residence. 

Prospective graduate students are invited to correspond with the De- 
partment and receive a more complete description of the faculty, its ac- 
tivities, and the facilities available; or preferably, to visit Broughton Hall 
and experience first-hand the stimulus of energetic pursuit of learning in 
this community. 

A program of graduate studies leading to the doctorate has been sub- 
mitted for administrative approval. Inquiries are invited. 

* On leave. 



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Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ME 401. Power Plants 3 or S 

Prerequisite: ME 302. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Application of thermodynamics, economics and other basic studies to the engineering of 
power generation, with emphasis on energy balances, combustion, steam generation, prime 
movers, heat transfer devices and auxiliaries. 

ME 405. Mech. Engineering Laboratory III 1-0 

Prerequisite: ME 306. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

The selection of appropriate instrumentation and the experimental analysis of small, 
predetermined engineering systems designed for flexibility and wide variation of parameters. 
Systems cover the gamut of Mechanical Engineering activity with emphasis on analysis of 
system rather than characteristics of particular systems. 

ME 406. Mech. Engineering Laboratory IV 0-1 

Prerequisite : ME 405. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Individual or small group investigation of an original problem under the supervision 
of a faculty member with an interest in the problem area. The investigation may be ex- 
perimental, analytical, or both. Emphasis is placed on the philosophy and methodology of 
engineering research, and on individual thinking and effort. 

ME 410. Jet Propulsion 

Prerequisites : ME 302 and ME 352 or EM 430. 

Application of fundamental principles of thermodynamics and the mechanics of a com- 
pressible fluid to the processes of jet-propulsion and turbo-propeller aircraft ; the effect 
of performance of components on performance of engine ; analysis of engine performance 
parameters. 

ME 411. Machine Design I 3-0 

Prerequisites: ME 312, EM 321. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Basic principles of the mechanical sciences applied to the analysis of machines, devices, 
and mechanical systems. State of stress, state of strain, elasticity, working stresses, stress 
concentration, fatigue, impact and shock, plasticity, thermal stress, wear, lubrication and 
contact stress. 

ME 412. Machine Design II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 411. 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Synthesis of machines, devices, and mechanical systems. The specification of systems, 
formulation of region of design, synthesis of elements, complete analysis of the ensemble, 
evaluation and closure of the design. Project activity with research emphasis. 

ME 441, 442. Technical Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite : Junior or senior standing. 

Meetings once a week for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics of 
current interest in Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 453. Applied Aerodynamics 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 352. 

Determination of design data, tunnel wall and ground effect interference corrections, 
spanwise and chordwise load distributions, performance estimation, and stability and 
control analysis. Attention is given to transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. 

ME 455, 456. Aeronautical Laboratory I, II 1-1 

Prerequisite: ME 352. 

Demonstration of wind tunnel testing methods and principles of fluid motion. Aerody- 
namic tests of airplane components and complete models. Calibration of instruments and 
other laboratory exercises related to aeronautical engineering. 

ME 459. Aircraft Structures 3-0 

Prerequisites: ME 351, EM 321. 

Theory of aircraft structures, design principles and methods of stress analysis, emphasis 
on thin-walled structures. 

ME 461, 462. Airplane Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: EM 321. 
Co-requisite: ME 453. 

Design procedure, preliminary layout from design specifications, weight and balance, 
performance estimation, control and stability analysis, principles of stress analysis. 

ME 473. Refrigeration 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 372. 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning. 

The fundamental principles of refrigeration, the performance of refrigerating machines 
and their application to air conditioning; controls of such systems. 



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ME 475, 476. Air Conditioning Laboratory III, IV 

Concurrent with ME 481, 482. 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning. 

The testing of heat transfer equipment including feed water heaters, radiators, con- 
vectors, unit heaters, heating panels; heating boilers, hot air furnaces, stokers, oil burners; 
air conditioners of both the spray and coil types, evaporative condensers. 

ME 481, 482. Air Conditioning Design I, II 3-3 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning. 

The design, layout and cost estimates of various types of heating and air conditioning 
systems. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ME 501. Steam and Gas Turbines 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 352 or EM 430. 

Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbomachinery flow 
passages; control and performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine 
processes. 

Mr. Doolittle. 

ME 502. Heat Transfer 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ME 301, MA 301. 

A study of the fundamental laws of heat transfer by conduction, con- 
vection and radiation; steady and unsteady state heat transfer. 

Mr. Irvine. 

ME 507, 508. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 3-3 

Prerequisite: ME 302. 

The fundamentals common to internal combustion engine cycles of opera- 
tion. The Otto engine: carburetion, fuel distribution, flame propagation, 
normal and knocking combustion, throttling, pumping, value and spark 
timing, and altitude effects; the Diesel engine: injection and spray forma- 
tion, fuel rating, atomization, penetration, diesel knock, combustion, pre- 
combustion, and scavenging, as applied to reciprocating and rotary engines. 

Mr. Ledbetter. 

ME 515. Experimental Stress Analysis 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ME 312. 

Stresses determined experimentally by photoelasticity methods, by me- 
chanical and electrical strain gages, by brittle coatings, etc. Effects of 
varying stresses. Mr. Whitfield. 

ME 516. Photoelasticity 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 515. 

Two and three-dimensional photoelasticity; the stress-optic law, isochro- 
matics, isoclinics, stress trajectories, fractional orders of interference; three 
dimensional techniques, oblique incidence, rotational and thickness effects; 
determination of principal stresses at interior points; laboratory investi- 
gations. Mr. Whitfield. 

ME 517. Lubrication 0-3 

Prerequisite: EM 430. 

The theory of hydrodynamic lubrication; Reynolds' equation, the Sommer- 
feld integration, effect of variable lubricant properties and energy equation 
for temperature rise. Properties of lubricants. Application to design of 
bearings. Boundary lubrication. Mr. Harrisbeger. 

126 



ME 521. Aeothermodynamics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301, EM 430. 

An examination of the basic concepts of gas dynamics such as the con- 
tinuum, domain of applicability of continuum, acoustic velocity, compressi- 
bility effects, and the conservation laws. Analysis of one dimensional flows 
such as isentropic flow, diabatic flow, flow with friction, the normal shock. 
An introduction to the vector formulation of multi-dimensional problems. 

Mr. Snyder. 

ME 545, 546. Project Work in Mechanical Engineering I, II 2-2 

Individual or small group investigation of a problem stemming from a 
mutual student-faculty interest. Emphasis is placed on providing a situation 
for exploiting student curiosity. Graduate Staff. 

ME 554. Advanced Aerodynamic Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 453. 

Development of fundamental aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathe- 
matical analysis and derivation of equations of motion, airfoil theory and 
comparison with experimental results. Introduction to supersonic flow 
theory. Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 562. Advanced Aircraft Structures 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 459, ME 453. 

Development of methods of stress analysis for aircraft structures, special 
problems in structural design, stiffened panels, rigid frames, indeterminate 
structures, general relaxation theory. Graduate Staff. 

ME 571. Air Conditioning 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 302. 

A fundamental study of summer and winter air conditioning including 
temperature, humidity, air velocity and distribution. 

Graduate Staff. 

ME 572. Refrigeration 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 302. 

A thermodynamic analysis of the simple, compound, centrifugal and 
multiple effect compression systems, the steam jet system and the absorp- 
tion system of refrigeration. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ME 601. Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics I 3-3 

Prerequisites: ME 302 or ME 303, and MA 301. 

First and Second Laws; theory of variable specific heats; general 
equations of thermodynamics; characteristic equations of state; reduced 
coordinates; prediction of properties of gases and vapors; chemical 
equilibrium; metastable states; thermodynamics of fluid flow. 

Mr. Dootlittle. 

ME 602. Statistical Thermodynamics 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 601, MA 511. 

Fundamental principles of kinetic theory, quantum mechanics, statistical 
mechanics and irreversible phenomena with particular reference to 

127 



thermodynamics systems and processes. The conclusions of the classical ther- 
modynamics are analyzed and established from the microscopic viewpoint. 

Messrs. Goglia and Lee. 

ME 603. Advanced Power Plants 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 401. 

A critical analysis of the energy balance of thermal power plants; thermo- 
dynamic and economic evaluation of alternate schemes of development; 
study of recent developments in the production of power. Mr. Lee. 

ME 601. Nuclear Power Plants 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 302, 502, EM 430, PY 419. 

Resources of fuels, power reactors, reactor materials and properties, 
coolants, pumps, heat exchangers, nuclear gas turbine power plants, 
nuclear steam power plants, special purpose plants, the economics of nu- 
clear power and selected topics on shielding, waste disposal and health pre- 
cautions. Mr. Lee. 

ME 605. Aerothermochemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 601, MA 511 or equivalent. 

A generalized treatment of combustion thermodynamics including deriva- 
tion of thermodynamics quantities by the method of Jacobians, criteria for 
thermodynamic equilibrium, computation of equilibrium composition and 
adiabatic flame temperature. Introduction to classical chemical kinetics. 
Conservation equations for a reacting system, detonation and deflagration. 
Theories of flame propagation, flame stabilization, and turbulent com- 
bustion. Mr. Snyder. 

ME 608. Advanced Heat Transfer I 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 502 or equivalent. 

Fundamental aspects, from an advanced viewpoint, will be considered in 
the conduction of heat through solids, convective phenomena, and the meas- 
urement and prediction of appropriate physical properties. Boundary value 
problems arising in heat conduction will be examined and both numerical 
and function solution techniques developed. Internal and External boun- 
dary layer analyses will be made on a variety of representative convection 
situations. Mr. Irvine. 

ME 609. Advanced Heat Transfer II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 608. 

Advanced topics in the nonisothermal flow of fluids through channels will 
be investigated for slug, laminar, transitional and turbulent conditions. The 
influence of mass transfer on flow and heat transfer processes will be con- 
sidered. Radiation exchange processes between solid surfaces and solid 
surfaces and gases both stationary and moving will be discussed. 

Mr. Irvine. 

ME 611, 612. Advanced Machine Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: ME 412. 

Kinematics of mechanical media, the stress tensor, the tensor of strains, 
elasticity, plasticity, time-dependent behavior; theories of failure, working 
stresses; shock and steady dynamic loading, creep, stress concentration, 



128 



thermal stress, contact stresses; energy theories, finite difference and re- 
laxation methods; hydrodynamic lubrication. Application to the design of 
machine frames, shafts, bearings, gears, springs, cams, etc. 

Mr. McDonald. 

ME 613. Mechanics of Machinery 3-0 

Prerequisites: ME 312, MA 512. 

Vector dynamics, d'Alembert's principle, Lagrange's equations; rigid 
kinematics, Euler's angles, rigid rotation, Coriolis accelerations; the inertia 
tensor. Application to mechanisms, gyroscopes, guidance and control sys- 
tems, rotating and reciprocating devices. Mr. McDonald. 

ME 614. Mechanical Transients and Machine Vibrations 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 312 or EM 545, MA 512. 

Dynamic loads in mechanical media are considered in two categories: 
steady vibrations and transient shock and impact. The Lagrange equations 
and the wave equation are employed to study internal stresses and dis- 
placements in mechanical devices which result from such loading. 

Mr. McDonald. 

ME 617. Plates and Shells in Mechanical Design 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 511, ME 611. 

The concept of members which are thin in one dimension, that is, plates 
and shells, is applied to mechanical design with particular emphasis on 
type of loading, conditions of service, and compliance of the member to its 
environment. Mr. McDonald. 

ME 641. Mechanical Engineering Seminar I, II 1-1 

Faculty and graduate student discussions centered around current re- 
search problems and advanced engineering theories. Graduate Staff. 

ME 645. Mechanical Engineering Research 3 to 6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in ME and approval of advisor. 
Individual research in the field of Mechanical Engineering. 

Graduate Staff. 

ME 651. Principles of Fluid Motion 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 453. 

Co-requisite: MA 511. 

Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of 
analysis are emphasized. Potential flow theory development with introduc- 
tion to the effects of viscosity and compressibility. Two dimensional and 
three dimensional phenomena are considered. Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 652. Dynamics of Compressible Few 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 651. 

Properties of compressible fluids, equation of motion of one-dimensional 
motion, channel flows, shock wave theory, methods of observation, and 
flows at transonic speeds. Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 653. Supersonic Aerodynamics 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 652. 

Equations of motion in supersonic flow, Prandtl-Meyer turns, method of 



129 



characteristics, hodograph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic air- 
foil theory, and boundary layer shock interaction. 

Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 654. Dynamics in Viscous Fluids 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 651. 

Development of the Navier-Stokes equations and the boundary layer 
theory. Laminar and turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment, 
flow separation, and transition. Mr. Pinkerton. 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

See Department of Mineral Industries 

DEPARTMENT OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: William Wyatt Austin, Head, William Callum Bell, Wil- 
liam Wurth Kriegel, John Mason Parker, III, Hans Heinrich 
Stadelmaier, Robert Franklin Stoops. 

Associate Professor: William Cullen Hackler. 

Assistant Professor: Henry Sewell Brown. 

The Department of Mineral Industries offers graduate programs leading 
to the degrees of Master of Science in Ceramic Engineering, Geological 
Engineering, and Metallurgical Engineering, and to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in Ceramic Engineering. Certain graduate courses are also 
offered for the benefit of students majoring in other areas who may be 
interested in pursuing advanced work in the Mineral Industries fields. 

Ceramic Engineering 

The graduate program in Ceramic Engineering includes study and re- 
search in the following sub-divisions: electrical ceramics, glass, vitreous 
enamels and coatings, structural clay products, refractories, whitewares 
(wall tile, sanitary ware, dinnerware, etc.), and materials associated with 
nuclear reactor and missile programs. 

The prerequisite for graduate work in ceramic engineering is a proficiency 
in the undergraduate courses required for the Bachelor's degree in Ceramic 
Engineering, or substantial equivalent. 

The ceramic laboratories of the department are well equipped to carry 
forward researches in the areas previously mentioned. These facilities are 
augmented by those of the Ceramic Research Laboratories of the Depart- 
ment of Engineering Research. Also available are the Electron Microscope 
and X-Ray Diffraction Laboratories of that Department, and the Nuclear 
Reactors of the Physics Department. 

Illustrative of the scope of graduate research in ceramics at North Caro- 
lina State College are some of the recent and current projects. These have 
encompassed studies of the dielectric and physical characteristics of ceramic 
bodies in the system BaTi0 3 , mechanical properties of single crystal sap- 
phire, studies of the power losses in low dielectric constant ceramics, the 

130 



effect of devitrification of the glassy phase on the conductivity of ceramic 
insulator bodies, studies in spodumene, tremolite, talc, and nepheline 
syenite in multiflux vitreous bodies, diffusion of selected isotopes through 
ceramic and cermet bodies, high temperature load bearing characteristics 
of silica-clay refractories, the effect of alkali on the hygroscopicity of 
glass, studies of the maximum safe rate of drying structural clays, and 
the pozzolanic properties of shale. 

Geological Engineering 

The graduate program in Geological Engineering is directed to the 
advanced training of qualified scientists who are needed to locate and 
evaluate mineral resources of the State and nation. Candidates for ad- 
mission to this program should hold the degree of Bachelor of Geological 
Engineering or a satisfactory equivalent. 

The solution of professional problems in geology, as in other fields to- 
day, is requiring more quantitative data and specialized training than can 
be included in an undergraduate curriculum. Graduate training makes pro- 
fessional advancement more sure and rapid. A person with such training 
in geology will find employment with oil and mining companies, govern- 
mental agencies, and educational and research institutions. 

North Carolina State College is on the Piedmont Plateau near the edge 
of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A great variety of problems in igneous, 
sedimentary, and metamorphic geology are to be found within a radius of 
50 miles of Raleigh. 

Facilities are available for research in mineralogy, petrography, economic 
geology, mineral dressing, and problems relating to engineering. Excellent 
collections of geological literature are available at North Carolina State 
College, at the University at Chapel Hill, and at Duke University in Dur- 
ham. 

Metallurgical Engineering 

The rapid expansion of the metal-working and related mineral industries 
in the South in recent years has brought about a sharp increase in the 
demand for trained leaders in these fields. There is at present intense em- 
phasis on advanced study and research on the fundamental behavior of 
metals and alloys. From this work will come urgently-needed improve- 
ments in metallic materials of construction to withstand increasingly drastic 
service requirements — higher stresses, higher temperatures, corrosive and 
radioactive environments. Consequently the engineering graduate who avails 
himself of the opportunity for advanced study in this field will greatly 
enhance his usefulness as an engineer regardless of his field of speciali- 
zation. 

Opportunities for men with graduate training in metallurgy and metal- 
lurgical engineering are almost unlimited. Industry and Universities today 
need approximately four times as many metallurgists with advanced de- 
grees as are available. It has been estimated that by 1975 the electrical, 
chemical, aircraft, and nuclear industries will require 50,000 research 
metallurgists and metallurgical engineers. The number presently available 
is approximately 3,000. Present ratios indicate that one-third to one- 

131 



half of the 50,000 graduates needed should have advanced training beyond 
the bachelor's degree. The shortage of graduates with advanced degrees is 
further accentuated by the need for qualified college faculty members to 
provide adequate instruction in metallurgical and related fields. Thus it is 
readily seen that there is a very real and urgent need for an intensification 
of emphasis at the graduate level on the training of metallurgical engineers 
to assume leadership in expanding the frontiers of knowledge of metals 
and alloys, and to provide a source of additional faculty manpower in this 
important area. 

North Carolina State College is one of the few institutions in the 
South, and only institution in North Carolina, prepared to offer gradu- 
ate instruction in metallurgical engineering. In addition to the advanced 
work in metallurgical engineering, the School of Engineering also offers 
an excellent program of supporting courses at the graduate level in the 
related field of physics chemistry, mathematics, engineering mechanics, 
and in mechanical, chemical, ceramic, and nuclear engineering. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

Financial assistance is available to graduate students in the Department 
of Mineral Industries; Graduate assistantships permit half-time studies in 
either Ceramic Engineering, Geological Engineering, or Metallurgical En- 
gineering, and half time to be devoted to teaching or other assigned duties. 
Also certain sponsored fellowships that permit full time to be devoted to 
graduate studies, such as the Edward Orton, Jr. Ceramic Foundation Fel- 
lowship, are available. Applications should be made to the Department. 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MIC 413. Ceramic Process Principles II 4-0 

Prerequisites: MIC 312 and CH 342. 

A continuation of MIC 312. Introduction to crystal chemistry and the constitution of glass. 
Consideration of special problems relating to glasses, glazes and equilibria with particular 
reference to refractories. 

MIC 414. Senior Thesis 3-3 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be 

elected. 

An introduction to research. Literature search, laboratory investigation and written report 

in the form of a thesis. Conference and laboratory. 

MIC 415, 416. Ceramic Engineering Design 2-2 

The methods of ceramic equipment, structure and plant design. 

MIC 420. Industrial Ceramics 3-0 

A study of the various ceramic industries, including manufacturing techniques, labor and 
professional relationships, and the present and future status of the respective industries. 
Lectures and discussion. 

MIC 425. Seminar 1-1 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be 

elected. 

Literature survey of selected topics in ceramic engineering. Oral and written reports, 

discussions. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIC 503. Ceramic Microscopy 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 531. 

Petrographic techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials 

132 



and products. Interpretation and representation of results. Mr. Kriegel. 

MIC 505. Research and Control Methods 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 413. 

Lectures, demonstrations and experiments on instrumental methods of 
ceramic investigation and statistical methods of control. Mr. Hackler. 

MIC 507, 508. Advanced Ceramic Experiments 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 414 or equivalent. 

Advanced studies in ceramic laboratory experimentation. 

Graduate Staff. 

MIC 511. Advanced Studies in Firing 3 or 3 

Prerequiste: MIC 413. 

Advanced studies of ceramic firing procedures with emphasis on the de- 
sign, calculation and economic evaluation of kilns and furnaces. 

Mr. Hackler. 

MIC 522. Structural Clay Products 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 413. 

The technology of the structural clay products industries with emphasis 
on the latest developments in the field. Mr. Kriegel. 

MIC 527. Refractories in Service 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CH 342. 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of the more important 
refractories in respect to their environment in industrial and laboratory 
furnaces. Mr. Kriegel. 

MIC 540. Glass Technology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 413. 

Fundamentals of glass manufacture including compositions, properties 
and application of the principle types of commercial glass. Mr. Hackler. 

MIC 548. Technology of Cements 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 413. 

The technology of the Portland cement industry including manufacture, 
control and uses. Mr. Kriegel. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MIC 605, 608. Crystal Structures 2-2 

Prerequisite: CH 342. 

Basic laws of crystal structure. Relation of crystal structure to chemical 

and physical properties Messrs. Hackler, Kriegel. 

MIC 613. Ceramic Thermal Mineralogy 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 605. 

Applications of the principles of thermal chemical mineralogy to ceramic 
problems. Mr. Stoops. 

MIC 615, 616. High Temperature Technology 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 613. 

An advanced consideration of the generation of high temperatures, 

133 



furnace designs and atmosphere controls. 

Theory of sintering, hot pressing and thermo-chemical properties of 
high-temperature materials. Mr. Stoops. 

MIC 650. Ceramic Research Credits by arrangement 

An original and independent investigation in ceramic engineering. A 
report of such an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 

MIC 660. Ceramic Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Reports and discussion of special topics in ceramic engineering and allied 
fields. Graduate Staff. 

MIC 661. Special Studies in Ceramic Engineering 1 to 3 credits 

per semester 
Special Studies of advanced topics in ceramic engineering. Credit will 
vary with the topic. Graduate Staff. 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MIG 411, 412. Economic Geology 3-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 120 and 330. 
Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Mode of occurrence, association, origin, distribution, and uses of economically valuable 
minerals. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. Mr. Brown. 

MIG 442. Petrology 0-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 120 and 330. 

Required of juniors in Geological Engineering. 

Materials of the earth's crust ; composition, texture, classification, megascopic identifica- 
tion, and alterations of the principal igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Lec- 
tures, laboratories, and field trips. Mr. Parker. 

MIG 452. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIG 442. 

Required in Geological Engineering. 

Sedimentary processes, products, and structures. Principles of sub-division of sedimentary 
terranes into natural units and the determination of their age and history. Lectures, lab- 
oratories, and field trips. Mr. Parker. 

MIG 461. Engineering Geology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 120. 

Required in fifth year of Geological Engineering. 

The application of geologic principles to engineering practice ; analysis of geologic factors 
and processes affecting specific engineering projects. Mr. Miller. 

MIG 462. Gological Surveying 0-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 351 and 442. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Methods of field observation and use of geologic surveying instruments in surface and 
underground work ; representation of geologic features by maps, sections and diagrams. 
Lectures, laboratories, and field work. Messrs. Parker. Miller. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIG 510. Mineral Industry 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Mineral Industries. 

Economics of mineral industry. Cycles of mineral production. Exhausti- 
bility. Reserves. Valuation of mineral property. National resources; es- 
sential, critical, and strategic minerals. World distribution and production. 

Mr. Parker. 



134 



MIG 522. Petroleum Geology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 351 and 442. 

Required in fifth year of Geological Engineering. 

Properties, orgin and modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural 
gas. Geologic and economic features of the principal oil and gas fields, 
mainly in the United States. Mr. Brown. 

MIG 531. Optical Mineralogy 3-0 

Prerequisites: MIG 330 and PY 202. 

Required of seniors in Geological Engineering. 

Optical principles involved in the petrographic (polarizing) microscope 
and related instruments. Microscopic determination of minerals in thin 
section and in fragments. Lectures and laboratory work. Mr. Parker. 

MIG 552. Geophysics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, PY 202. 

Required in fifth year of Geological Engineering. 

Discussion of the fundamental principles underlying all geophysical 
methods; procedure and instruments involved in gravitational, magnetic, 
seismic, electrical and other methods of studying geological structures 
and conditions; study of applications and interpretations of results. 

Mr. Miller. 

MIG 571, 572. Mining and Mineral Dressing 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIG 372. 

Required in fifth year of Geological Engineering. 

Principles of the mineral industry; mining laws, prospecting, sampling, 
development, drilling, blasting, handling, ventilation and safety; administra- 
tion, surveying, assaying; preparation, benefication and marketing. 

Mr. Miller. 

MIG 581. Geomorphology 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIG 442. 

Required in fifth year of Geological Engineering. 

A systematic study of land forms and their relations to processes and 
stages of development and adjustment to underlying structure. Lectures, 
map interpretations, and field trips. Mr. Brown. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

MIG 611, 612. Advanced Economic Geology 3-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 411, 412. 

Required in fifth year of Geological Engineering. 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. 

Mr. Brown. 

MIG 632. Microscopic Determination of Opaque Minerals 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: MIG 531. 

Identification of metallic, opaque minerals in polished sections by physical 
properties, etch reactions and microchemical tests. Laboratories. 

Mr. Brown. 

135 



MIG 642. Advanced Petrography 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: MIG 442, 531. 

Application of the petrographic microscope to the systematic study of 
the composition and origin of rocks; emphasis on igneous and metamorphic 
rocks. Mr. Parker. 

MIG 681, 682. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

Scientific articles, progress reports and special problems of interest to 
geologists and geological and mining engineers discussed. 

Graduate Staff. 

MIG 691. Geological Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports; special work in Geology 
to meet the needs and interests of the students. Graduate Staff. 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

MIM 401, 402. Metallurgical Operations I, II 4-4 

Prerequisite: MIM 332. 

A systematized treatment of the fundamental operations involved in the production and 

fabrication of metals and alloys. Part I deals primarily with procedures and operations 

employed in chemical or extractive metallurgy. Part II covers the operations of physical 
and mechanical metallurgy. Metallurgical Engineering Staff. 

MIM 421, 422. Metallurgy I, II 2-2 

Prerequisite: CH 102. 

Required of seniors in M.E. and Ae.E. 

The constitution, structure and properties of engineering ferrous and non-ferrous metals 
and al'oys : influences of mechanical working and heat treatment; physical testing, corrosion 
and its prevention. Metallurgical Engineering Staff. 

MIM 423. Metallurgical Laboratory 1 or 1 

Co-requisite: MIM 421 or 422. 

Laboratory work to accompany Metallurgy I, II. Metallurgical Engineering Staff. 

MIM 431. 432. Metallography I, II 5-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 332. 

An intensive study of the principles and techniques for examination and correlation of 
the structure, constitution, and properties of metals and alloys. 

Metallurgical Engineering Staff. 

MIM 451, 452. Metallurgical Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite : Senior standing in MET. E. 

Reports and discussion of special topics in metallurgical engineering and related subjects. 

Metallurgical Engineering Staff. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIM 521, 522. Advanced Physical Metallurgy I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422. 

Theories concerning behavior and control of engineering alloys, reaction 
rates in the solid state, and alloy influences; current heat treating prac- 
tices; surface treatments; behavior of metals at high and low temperatures; 
special purpose alloys; powder metallurgy; review of modern equipment 
and methods for the study of metals. Mr. Stadelmaier. 

MIM 523, 524. Metallurgical Factors in Design 2-2 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

A study of the metallurgical factors that must be considered in using 
metals in design. Mr. Austin. 

136 



MIM 541, 542. Principles of Corrosion I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422. 

The fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electrochemical 
nature of corrosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, 
methods of corrosion protection. Laboratory work included. Mr. Austin. 

MIM 545, 546. Advanced Metallurgical Experiments L II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422, or approval of instructor. 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental project 
dealing with metallurgy or metallography. A seminar period is provided, 
and a written report is required. Graduate Staff. 

MIM 561. Advanced Structure and Properties of Materials 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIM 422. 

A systematic treatment of the fundamental physico-chemical principles 
governing the constitution of both metallic and ceramic materials. Correla- 
tion of these principles with physical, mechanical and chemical properties 
of materials. Particular emphasis is placed upon materials of construction 
for nuclear reactors. Lecture and Laboratory. Graduate Staff. 

MIM 562. Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 561. 

Engineering aspects of problems involved in the selection and application 
of reactor materials. Specific attention is given to elevated temperature 
behavior, fatigue, corrosion, irradiation damage, and the fabrication and 
processing of these materials. Lecture and Laboratory. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MIM 651, 652. Theory and Structure of Metals 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 522. 

An advanced interpretation of the development of theories of the metallic 
state with emphasis on modern physical concepts. Topics include theory of 
crystallinity, bonding forces, stability of metallic structures, diffusion, and 
dislocation theory. Mr. Stadlemaier. 

MIM 695. Metallurgical Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Independent investigation of an appropriate problem in Metallurgical 

Engineering. A report on this investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

Graduate Faculty 

Professor Emeritus: Lawrence Earle Hinkle. 
Professor: George W. Poland, Head. 

The courses listed below are recommended to assist graduate students 
in preparing themselves for the use of modern foreign languages in re- 
search and advanced study. Students are given the opportunity of working 
a translation project in connection with their subject of major interest. 

137 



Although these courses do not carry graduate language credit, they may 
be taken as a means of attaining a reading knowledge. 

Certification may be obtained in languages not normally taught by the 
department with special permission of the Graduate School. 

ML 110, 111(G). Russian 3-3 

These two courses are given for graduate students only, the first dealing with grammar 
and structure and the second, with reading of Russian scientific material. 

ML 401, 402. Scientific French 3-3 

Prerequisite :. Knowledge of basic French grammar. 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines and tech- 
nical journals. Reading material is adjusted to individual needs. Conferences. 

MI 405, 406. Scientific Spanish 3-3 

Prerequisite: Kno-vledge of basic Spanish grammar. 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines, and technical 
journals. Special attention given to the comprehension of the thought of the article under 
consideration and its accurate rendition into English. Conferences. 

ML 503. German Grammar for Graduate Students 3-3 

This course is open to Graduate Students only and is designed to present 
the grammar of scientific German as rapidly as possible in preparation 
for the reading course which follows. 

ML 504. Scientific German 3-3 

Prerequisite: ML 503 or equivalent. 

Reading and translation of technical German, supplemented by discussions 
on terminology, word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic tech- 
niques. Subject material adjusted to individual needs; Conferences. 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION 
AND GUIDANCE 

See Education 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

PHI 401. Foundations of Science 3 or 3 

Nature and validity of knowledge, basic concepts of modern science, scientific method, and 
the implication of the philosophy of modern science for ethics, social philosophy, and the 
nature of reality. 
REL 403. Religions of the World 3 or 3 

History, general characteristics, and central teachings of the major living religions of the 
world, with a brief consideration of contemporary secular movements that are in a sense 
religious. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professors: Arthur Clayton Menius, Head, Forest Wesley Lancaster, 
Jefferson Sulltvan Meares, Raymond Leroy Murray, Graduate 
Administrator, Rufus Hummer Snyder, Newton Underwood, Arthur 
W. Waltner. 

Associate Professor: Joseph Thomas Lynn. 

Assistant Professors: William Robert Davis, Wesley Osborn Doggett, 
Raoul M. Freyre, David H. Martin. 

ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

The Master of Science in Engineering Physics is offered to enable those 
students whose interest is in applied physics to obtain a basic training 
in the fundamental subject matter and techniques of physics in an engineer- 
ing environment. 

The inclusion of a number of elective courses allows for a minor in some 
field of engineering or mathematics. 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Nuclear Engineering refers to research on nuclear processes, and to design 
and operation of equipment in the atomic energy field. Both the knowledge 
of basic science and the methods of engineering are applied to the solution 
of the new and unusual problems encountered in this work. The need for 
trained engineers has grown steadily, along with the application of nuclear 
energy to propulsion and electrical power, to isotope production, and to 
radiation research in industry. The program of study in Nuclear Engineer- 
ing, established in 1950 at North Carolina State College, was the first of its 
kind in the United States. The areas of study for the Master's candidate 
include : 

(a) Basic Science: Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Chem- 
istry, and Mathematics. 

(b) Nuclear Technology: Reactor Theory and Design, Radiation 
Hazards and Protection, properties of nuclear reactor materials 
and by-products. 

(c) Elective courses in related engineering fields of interest to the 
student. 

139 



(d) Research and preparation of a thesis based on independent 
investigation. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The Ph.D. degree is offered in both Engineering Physics and Nuclear 
Engineering. The major research interests of the Department are Experi- 
mental Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Nuclear Reactor Theory, and Theo- 
retical Physics. Research in infrared, ultrasonics, thermodynamics and spec- 
troscopy is also available. Arrangements may also be made to perform 
research in a related field of Engineering. 

Research Equipment 

Several nuclear machines are available for research and laboratory train- 
ing. There are (a) an enriched uranium, heterogeneous water-moderated 
reactor of power up to 100 kilowatts, (b) a low-powered homogeneous 
enriched uranium "water-boiler" reactor, (c) a subcritical natural uranium 
assembly, (d) a one mev Van de Graaf Accelerator. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PY 401. Mechanics 4-0 

Prerequisite: PY 202. 
Co-requisite: MA 301. 

An intermediate course in theoretical mechanics. Statics and dynamics of particles and 
rigid bodies. Lectures, problems, rectations, with one laboratory per week. Mr. Meares. 

PY 402. Heat and Sound 0-4 

Prerequisite: PY 202. 
Co-requisite: MA 301. 

An intermediate course in the principles of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, heat transfer, 
and vibration. Lectures, problems, recitations and one laboratory per week. Mr. Meares. 

PY 403. Electricity and Magnetism 4-0 

Prerequisite: PY 202. 

Co-requisite: MA 301. 

An intermediate course in the fundamentals of static and dynamic electricity and electro- 
magnetic theory. Lectures, problems, recitations, and one laboratory per week. 

Mr. Doggett. 

PY 404. Optics 0-4 

Prerequisite: PY 202. 

Co-requisite: MA 301. 

An intermediate course in physical and geometrical optics. Lectures, problems, recitations, 
and one laboratory per week. Mr. Freyre. 

PY 4C7. Introduction to Modern Physics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202. 

A hr r of survey of the important development in atomic and nuclear physics. 

Topics covered include: atomic and molecular structure, determination of the mass and 
charge of ions, origin of spectra, ion acceleration, nuclear reactions, and cosmic rays. Par- 
ticular attention is paid to the practical applications of these developments. Staff. 

PY 410. Nuclear Physics I 4 or 4 

Prerequisite: PY 407. 

An introductory treatment of the properties of nuclear particles and their interactions 
with matter. Consideration is given to natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear reac- 
tions, fission, and the structure of simple nuclei. A three-hour laboratory is included. 

Mr. Waltner. 

PY 419. Introduction to Nuclear Engineering 2-0 

Prerequisite: PY 410. 

A survey of the engineering applications of nuclear energy. The principles and practices 
of isotope separation, production of plutonium, and nuclear reactor operation are studied 
along with the peace-time uses of products and by-products of nuclear reactors. Major engi- 
neering problems involved in each phase of the study are defined and the special methods 
of approach indicated. Mr. Murray. 



140 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PY 501. Wave Mechanics and Applications 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 407 and MA 301. 

An introductory course in wave mechanics with applications to the free 
particle, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotator, and the hydrogen atom. Includes 
discussion of approximation methods in the solutions of other problems. 
Primarily designed for a one semester introduction to wave mechanics 
for those students not specializing in theoretical physics. Mr. Menius. 

PY 503. Introduction to Theoretical Physics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 401 or 403, MA 541. 

An introductory course which offers preparation necessary for advanced 
graduate study. The course, presented from the viewpoint of vector and 
tensor calculus, includes: particle dynamics, Lagrange's equations of motion, 
Hamilton's principle, mechanics of rigid bodies, topics in electromagnetic 
theory and relativity, with an elementary treatment of the motion of 
charged particles. 

Mr. Freyre. 

PY 510. Nuclear Physics II 4-0 

Prerequisite: PY 410. 

A continuation of physics 410 with particular emphasis on neutron 
physics, nuclear energy levels, meson theory, nuclear resonance, atomic 
and molecular magnetism, and cosmic radiation. A three-hour laboratory 
is included. Mr. Waltner. 

PY 518. Radiation Hazard and Protection 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PY 410. 

The hazards from external exposure to ionizing radiation are evaluated. 
The dosages resulting from the ingestion of radioactive materials are com- 
puted. The precautionary methods used in radioactive work are presented. 
Selected biological effects of ionizing radiation are studied. 

Mr. Underwood. 

PY 520. Physical Technology in Radioactivity 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PY 410. 

Emphasis in this course is on the physical principles used in detecting, 
handling, and quantitatively measuring radioactive samples. The prepara- 
tion of samples for radioactivity measurements and the calculation methods 
used in analyzing such data are summarized. At least three hours of labor- 
atory practice per week. Mr. Lynn. 

PY 526. Ionization Phenomena and Electron Optics 0-2 

Prerequisites: PY 404, 410. 

Methods of producing ions, and the interaction of ions with electric and 
magnetic fields are discussed, together with a brief survey of the present 
status of electron optics. Mr. Waltner. 

PY 530. Elementary Nuclear Reactor Theory 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 410; MA 511 or 532. 

A lecture course in the principles of chain reactors. Slowing down of 

141 



neutrons, neutron diffusion equations, space distribution of neutrons, con- 
ditions for critically, reactor dimensions for simple geometries, elementary 
group theories, and time dependent reactor behavior. Mr. Murray. 

PY 531. Nuclear Reactor Laboratory 1 or 1 

Corequisite: PY 530, 518 except by permission. 

Experiments are performed on the characteristics of the reactor, the 
effectiveness and response time of control apparatus, reactor-transient 
behavior; level, distribution and utilization of reactor radiation; survey, 
monitoring and safety techniques in procedures involving reactor radiation. 
Registration will be limited to suitably sized groups. Mr. Martin. 

PY 541. Advanced Experiments in Physics 1-1 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202. 

Covers the technique and theory of selected experiments in mechanics, 

heat, sound, light, or electricity. The treatment and interpretation of data 
are stressed. Graduate Staff. 

PY 544. Vibration and Wave Motion 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 401. 

The dynamics of vibratory and oscillatory motion. Analogies in mechani- 
cal, electrical and acoustical vibrating systems. Analysis of wave motion 
and propagation in different media. Mr. Lancaster. 

PY 545. Applied Acoustics 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 544. 

The dynamical theory of sound. Sources of sound, measurement of sound 
intensity, measurement of frequency, acoustical impedance and transmis- 
sion of sound, transducers, filters and resonators, acoustics of speech and 
hearing, reception and reproduction of sound, acoustics of buildings. 

Mr. Lancaster. 

PY 551. Introduction to X-Rays 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202. 

Origin, production, absorption, single crystal diffraction, and powder 
diffraction are studied. These basic topics are then applied to detection 
or defects in welds and castings and to the determination of crystal struc- 
ture and particle and fibre size. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour lab. 
per week.) Graduate Staff. 

PY 552. Introduction to the Structure of Solids; Crystallography 0-3 
Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202; PY 551 recommended 
Elementary consideration of amorphous and crystalline solids, metals, 

conductors, and semi-conductors. Some optical crystallography is included. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PY 601, 602. Advanced General Physics 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 503. 
Co-requisite: MA 661. 
Mathematical and theoretical approach to relationships between the vari- 

142 



ous branches of physics, with applications to mechanical, electrical, optical, 
thermal, and vibratory problems. The restricted theory of relativity, elec- 
trodynamics, the theory of electrons, classical field theory, and the general 
theory of relativity. Mr. Davis. 

PY 610. Advanced Nuclear Physics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 510; PY 611, except by permission. 

Current hypotheses of nuclear structure and reactions including deuteron 
binding, neutron-proton scattering, the compound nucleus, stripping reac- 
tions, shell structure, beta decay, neutron resonances and mesons. The use 
of neutrons in present-day nuclear research is emphasized. Mr. Doggett. 

PY 611. Quantum Mechanics 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 501, MA 512. 

Theory of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic and molecular 
structure, scattering phenomena, and a semi-classical treatment of the 
interaction of radiation with matter. Mr. Davis. 

PY 612. Advanced Quantum Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 601, PY 611. 

Dirac's relativistic electron theory, elementary scalar and vector meson 
field theory. Introduction to quantum electrodynamics and the general theory 
of quantized fields. Mr. Davis. 

PY 619. Heterogeneous Reactor Design 3-0 

Prerequisite: PY 530. 

Design analysis of heterogeneous power reactors. Theory of resonance 
capture, thermal utilization, and flux distributions in multi-region systems. 
Transient and steady state poison effects. Heat transfer limitations in 
reactors. Evaluation of materials of construction, coolants and fuels. One- 
velocity transport theory. Mr. Murray. 

PY 620. Nuclear Radiation Attenuation 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 530, MA 532. 

Physical theory of neutron and gamma-ray behavior in matter. Calcula- 
tions of source terms, attenuation factors, heating rates, geometrical trans- 
formations and radioactive decay effects required in the design of nuclear 
radiation shields. Transport theoiy of gamma-ray and neutron transmission 
through matter. Analysis of experimental techniques for obtaining shielding 
data. Mr. Doggett. 

PY 621. Kinetic Theory of Gases 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 503, MA 511. 

The theory of molecular motion, including the velocity and density dis- 
tribution functions, the phenomena of viscosity, heat conduction and diffu- 
sion; equations of state; fluctuations. Mr. Menius. 

PY 622. Statistical Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 503, MA 511; PY 621 except by permission. 

A treatment of statistical mechanics from both the quantum and classical 
point of view. Development of theories from the thermodynamical stand- 
point and their practical application. Mr. Davis. 

143 



PY 630. Homogeneous Reactor Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 530. 

Calculations of critical loading of homogeneous power reactors, flux 
distribution, control rod values, theory of two and multigroup methods, 
and evaluation of group constants. Uses and limitations of age and diffusion 
theory. Energy-dependent transport theory. The time-dependent behavior 
of a reactor with negative temperature coefficient. Mr. Murray. 

PY 631, 632. Atomic and Molecular Spectra 3-3 

Prerequisites: PY 501. Corequisites: PY 611, MA 532. 

Atomic models and coupling schemes. Multiplet series, Zeeman, Paschen- 
Back, and Stark effects. Hyperfme structure and complex spectra. Spectra 
of polyatomic molecules. Infrared and Raman Spectra. Applications adapted 
to the interests of the students in the course. Mr. Lancaster. 

PY 661, 662. The Solid State 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 552. 

The electron theory of conduction, electrical and thermal conduction in 
solids, and surface phenomena, with applications to physical behavior and 
usage of solids. Graduate Staff. 

PY 670. Seminar. 1-1 

Literature surveys, written and oral presentation of papers on special 
topics. Graduate Staff. 

PY 690. Research Credits by arrangement 

Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake research in some 
selected field of Physics. Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: D. E. Ellis, Head, C. N. Clayton, F. A. Haasis, T. T. Hebert, 
A. Kelman, E. L. Moore, L. W. Nielsen, C. J. Nusbaum. 

Professor Emeritus: S. G. Lehman. 

Associate Professors: J. L. Apple, Robert Aycock, G. B. Lucas, R. R. 
Nelson, J. N. Sasser, N. N. Winstead. 

Assistant Professors: W. E. Cooper, Hedwig Hirschmann, D. M. Kline, 
Robert T. Sherwood. 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in 
Plant Pathology. 

Excellent laboratory and greenhouse facilities are available for graduate 
study in plant pathology including special equipment for all phases of 
phytopathological research. The state's wide range of soil types and cli- 
matic areas make possible the commercial production of a wide variety of 
field, vegetable, fruit and ornamental crops. Thus, especially favorable 
opportunities exist for training in diseases caused by nematodes, viruses, 
fungi and bacteria which affect many diverse crops. Land and facilities for 
experimental work are available at some sixteen permanent research stations 
located throughout the state. Student participation in the Plant Disease 

144 



Clinic provides excellent training and experience in the diagnosis of all 
types of plant diseases. 

Many opportunities for employment in research, extension, and teaching 
are available to men with M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in plant pathology. Open- 
ings are available for qualified men in plant pathology research in the 
United States Department of Agriculture, State Experiment Stations and 
in Industry. Unusual opportunities exist in foreign service through inter- 
national and federal organizations as well as commercial production enter- 
prises. The rapid development of agricultural chemicals for disease control 
offer numerous opportunities in both research, promotion and service 
activities. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

***PP 503. Diagnosis of Plant Diseases Summer School 3 

Prerequisites: One advanced course in Plant Pathology and permission 

of instructor. 

A study of techniques used in plant disease diagnosis with emphasis on 

diagnostic value of signs and symptoms for certain types of diseases. 

Consideration will be given to major sources of descriptive information 

on plant pathogens and the use of keys for the identification of fungi. 

Mr. Hebert. 

PP 515. Diseases of Field Crops 0-3 

Prerequisite: PP 315. 

An advanced study of the more important diseases of North Carolina 
field crops such as cotton, corn, tobacco, soybeans, alfalfa, clover, grasses, 
and small grains with major emphasis on identification, cause and control. 

Mr. Lucas. 

**PP 516. Diseases of Fruit Crops 0-3 

Prerequisite: PP 315. 

Study of causes, symptoms, epiphytology, and principles of control of 
major diseases of pome, stone, nut, and berry crops. Mr. Clayton. 

*PP 517. Diseases of Vegetable Crops 0-3 

Prerequisite: PP 315. 

Studies designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of the 
etiology, symptomatology, epiphytology, and control of major vegetable 
crop diseases. Mr. Winstead. 

Courses for Graduate Students Only 

PP 601. Phytopathology I 4-0 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and permission of the instructor. 

A study of the principles of phytopathological research. The course is 
designed to apply the classical scientific method to disease investigation. 
Exercises will include appraising disease problems, reviewing literature, 
laboratory and greenhouse experiments and the evaluation and presentation 
of data. Mr. Apple. 

•Offered 1960-61 and in alternate years. 
•♦Offered 1961-62 and in alternate years. 
•♦♦Offered Summer, 1960 and in alternate years. 

145 



*PP 602. Phytopathology II 0-4 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and permission of the instructor. 
The basic concepts of the etiology, pathology, epiphytology and control 
of plant diseases. Mr. Nusbaum. 

PP 601. Plant Parasitic Nematodes 2-0 

Prerequisite: PP 315. 

A study of morphology, anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of plant para- 
sitic nematodes. Methods of isolating nematodes from soil and plant parts 
and other laboratory techniques used in the study and identification of nema- 
todes will be considered. Miss Hirschmann. 

*PP 605. Plant Virology 3-0 

Prerequisites; PP 315, GN 411, and a course in organic chemistry. 

A study of plant viruses including effects on host plants, transmission, 
classification, methods of purification, determination of properties, chemi- 
cal nature, structure and multiplication. Mr. Hebert. 

*PP 607 and GN 607. Genetics of Fungi 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512, or equivalent and permission of instructor. 
Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on prin- 
ciples and theories that have evolved in recent developments. 

Mr. Nelson. 

**PP 608. History of Phytopathology 1-0 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and permission of instructor. 

Development of the science of phytopathology from its early beginnings 
to the early part of the 20th century. Mr. Ellis. 

PP 611. Nematode Diseases of Plants 0-3 

Prerequisite: PP 504. 

A study of plant diseases caused by nematodes. Special consideration will 
be given to host-parasite relationships, host ranges, and life cycles of the 
more important economic species. Principles and methods of control will be 
considered. Mr. Sasser. 

PP 615. Research in Plant Pathology Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. 
Original research in connection with a thesis problem in Plant Pathology. 

Graduate Staff. 

PP 625. Seminar in Plant Pathology 1-1 

Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman. 

Discussion of phytopathological topics selected and assigned by seminar 
chairman. Graduate Staff. 

UNC. Botany 212, 211. Advanced Mycology 5-5 

Prerequisite: BO 42 or 101 (UNC) or equivalent. 

Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Fungi Imperfecti. These 
courses are intended for students who plan to specialize in Mycology, Plant 
Pathology, and Biology. Classwork consists of lectures and student reports 



♦Offered 1960-61 and in alternate years. 
'♦Offered 1961-62 and in alternate years. 



146 



on literature. Laboratory work consists of the collection and identification 
of fungi and the study of their structure and development, and techniques 
for isolation and pure culture. 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory each week. 

Mr. Couch. 

DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Edward Walker Glazener, Head, Clifford Warren Barber, 

Charles Horace Hill, Jr. 
Associate Professors: Henry Wilburn Garren, Joseph Wheeler Kelly. 
Assistant Professors: William Lowry Blow, Freeman Waldo Cook, 

Daniel Fromm. 

The M. S. degree is offered in Poultry Science with major studies in 
genetics, nutrition, veterinary pathology, and physiology. Students expect- 
ing to begin graduate study must have the equivalent of an undergraduate 
major in poultry and a background in the biological sciences. Fundamental 
work in chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, bacteriology, statistics, and 
fields that relate directly to the major interest are required as a part of 
the program for the M. S. degree. 

Excellent facilities are available for graduate study. The laboratory 
building contains offices, library, bird rooms, and other equipment for 
comprehensive research studies. In addition to the laboratory building, re- 
search plants in both chickens and turkeys are available. These plants, 
with three branch farms located in the western, piedmont and eastern part 
of the State, provide an opportunity for genetic and nutrition studies under 
field conditions. 

To offer wider scope to the regular programs of work, cooperative projects 
are underway with the U.S.D.A. in genetics and pathology. 

Many opportunities exist in educational and commercial fields for poultry 
majors with advanced degrees. The larger feed manufacturers, hatchery- 
men, and commercial breeders as well as educational institutions are de- 
manding men with advanced training. The supply of trained men is limited 
and starting salaries are adequate. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PO 401. Poultry Diseases 8-4 

Prerequisites : Required of majors in Poultry Science. Elective for others with permission 

of the instructor. 

The prevention, control, and treatment of the diseases of poultry. Mr. Barber. 

PO 402. Commercial Poultry Enterprises 0-4 

Prerequisites : Required of majors in Poultry Science. Elective for others with permission 

of the instructor. 

Principles of incubation, hatchery management, development and organization of plana 

for the building, operation, and maintenance of a commercial poultry plant. Problem. 

Mr. Brown. 

PO 403. Poultry Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisites : Required of majors in Poultry Science, senior year. 
Topics and problems relating to Poultry Science and Poultry Industry assigned for report 

and discussion. Staff. 



147 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PO 520. Poultry Breeding 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 411. Required of majors in Poultry Science. 

Elective for others with permission of the instructor. 

Application of genetic principles to chickens and turkeys, considering 
physical traits and physiological characteristics — feather patterns, egg 
production, hatchability, growth, body conformation, and utility. Laboratory 
problems. Mr. Glazener. 

PO 521. Poultry Nutrition 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 203, 451. Required of majors in Poultry Science; elec- 
tive for others. 

Protein, vitamin, and mineral requirements for growth, egg production, 
and reproduction in the chicken and turkey. Methods of feeding and com- 
pounding poultry mashes. Laboratory exercises in the production of vitamin 
and mineral deficiences. Mr. Kelly. 

PO 522. Endocrinology of the Fowl 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 or equivalent. 

Study of the endocrine system with respect to its physiological impor- 
tance to metabolism, growth, and reproduction. Mammalian examples as 
well as the fowl are used to illustrate basic concepts. Laboratory techniques 
and demonstrations. Mr. Garren. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PO 601. Advanced Poultry Breeding Semester by arrangement 

3 credit hours 

Prerequisites: ST 511 and 512, PO 520. 

Study of lethal, skeletal, and feather variations. Linkage and chromosome 
mapping of the fowl. Population genetics and contemporary ideas concern- 
ing the breeding for improved production. Mr. Blow. 

PO 602. Advanced Poultry Nutrition Semester by arrangement 

3 credit hours 

Prerequisites: PO 521, CH 551 or equivalent. 

Research problem in poultry nutrition involving the design and carrying 
out of microbiological and chick experiments. Results from microbiological 
and chick essays are correlated. Mr. Hill. 

PO 611. Poultry Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Poultry Science. 

Critical study of some particular problem involving original investigation. 
A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's degree. 

Graduate Staff. 

PO 613. Special Problems in Poultry Science Max. 6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

Specific problems using advanced technology for theory exploration. 

Graduate Staff. 



148 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Howard G. Miller, Head; Key L. Barkley, Harold M. Corter. 
Associate Professors: John Oliver Cook, Joseph Clyde Johnson, Slater 

E. Newman, Paul J. Rust. 
Assistant Professor: Clifton W. Gray. 
Instructor: Donald W. Drewes. 
Visiting Professor: William McGehee. 

The Psychology Department offers courses leading to the Master of 
Science Degree. An industrial option includes courses in the application of 
scientific methods to the study of industrial behavior based on strong re- 
search training. An experimental option provides a program with major 
emphasis on the development of proficiency in experimental methodology 
in psychological research. Courses are also offered which provide profes- 
sional competence in school psychology. 

All programs are designed to provide the student with solid grounding 
in the basic areas of psychology. A set of required core courses includes 
statistics, social psychology, experimental psychology, psychology of per- 
sonality, and the theory and method of measurement. 

A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate credit is required for 
the Master's Degree, but the actual graduate program for each student is 
determined on the basis of his individual needs, interests and accomplish- 
ments and very likely will require hours in excess of this minimum. 

Admission requirements for graduate study in the Department of Psy- 
cology are as follows: A minimum of twenty semester credit hours in under- 
graduate psychology, the maintenance of a B average in undergraduate 
psychology courses; satisfactory grades in other collegiate studies; satis- 
factory references from faculty and others in regard to character and 
quality of work. In some special cases provisional acceptance is granted 
where some of the requirements are not met. 

The Psychology Department is housed in Tompkins Hall. The physical 
facilities for the training of graduate students in psychology include test- 
ing, statistics, general and human engineering laboratories. 

In addition to teaching and basic research activities, the Psychology 
Department carries on research for industrial, military and other organiza- 
tions. To facilitate this activity, the Industrial Psychology Center has been 
established as a special organization within the Department. 

Employment opportunities for persons holding the Master's Degree in 
industrial psychology are excellent. Recent graduates from the industrial 
psychology program at State College have found responsible positions in 
business and industrial organizations, in government agencies, especially 
those engaged in research of an applied nature. The armed forces likewise 
continue to need trained psychologists in their research programs. Many of 
our students elect to continue graduate study toward the doctorate in psy- 
chology. Their master's program in addition to providing them with good 
professional training has proved to be excellent preparation for further 
graduate study. 

149 



A limited number of research and teaching assistantships are available 
annually. These assistantships are usually based on one-third time assign- 
ments, but are also occasionally for one-half time. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PSY 438. Industrial Psychology II 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, 337. 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern industry ; selection, 
placement, and training of workers. Messrs. Drewes, Gray, Miller. 

PSY 441. Human Factors in Equipment Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200. 

Human factors in the design of machines and other equipment. Items of equipment are 
understood as extensions of man's capacity to sense, comprehend, and control his environ- 
ment, xnciuueb pi-u^.eius in uie paycnOiOgj oi inxormauon, communication, control and 
invention. Messrs. Cook, Gray. 

PSY 464. Visual Perception for Designers 3-0 

Prerequisite: PSY 200. 

The nature of the seeing process and its relation to architecture, industrial arts, and 
to the industrial, engineering, and textile design fields. Topics include the physical basis 
of sight, perception of color and form, vision and illumination, psychological factors in 
visual design, and a unit of training planned to improve the student's ability to perceive 
visual form. Mr. Cook. 

PSY 475. Child Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or 304. 

The development of the individual child of the elementary school age will be the in- 
clusive object of study in this course. Emphasis will be placed upon the intellectual, social, 
emotional, and personality development of the child. Physical growth will be emphasized 
as necessary to an understanding of the psychological development of the pupil. 

Mr. Barkley. 

(Course offered during Summer session only) 

PSY 476. Psychology of Adolescence 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or 304. 

Mental growth, social development, and interests of adolescent boys and girls. 

Messrs. Johnson, Barkley. 

PSY 490. Social Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 
Social applications of psychology : social stimulation, response, and attitudes. 

Messrs. Barkley, Miller. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PSY 501. Intermediate Applied Experimental Psychology 

Prerequisite: Psychology 200 and three additional hours in Psychology. 

Experimental study of problems in the major areas of general and theo- 
retical psychology which have special significance in educational, industrial, 
and applied social psychology. Emphasis will be placed upon description of 
problems, study of methods, design of experiments, and procedures for the 
analysis and presentation of data. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman. 

PSY 502. Physiological Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of Psychology, including Psy. 200 and 201. 
A survey of the physiological bases of behavior including the study of 
coordination, sensory processes, brain functions, emotions, and motivation. 

Mr. Corter. 

PSY 504. Advanced Educational Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: Six hours in psychology. 

An advanced course giving a critical appraisal and a consideration of 

150 



the practical applications for education of modern psychological findings. 

Messrs. Johnson, Newman. 
(Course offered during Summer session only) 

PSY 511. Advanced Social Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisites: Psychology 200 and three additional hours in Psychology. 

A study of social relationships and their psychological bases; emphasis 
on those aspects of behavior determined by personal interactions; work will 
involve analysis of representative research studies, and doing individual 
projects in industrial and rural areas. Messrs. Barkley, Miller. 

PSY 514. Current Problems in Psychology 1-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology. 

A study of current developments in theory and research in several areas 
of psychological interests. Graduate Staff. 

PSY 530. Abnormal Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, 302. 

A study of the causes, symptomatic behavior, and treatment of the major 
personality disturbances, emphasis also placed on preventive mental hygiene 
methods. Mr. Corter. 

PSY 535. Tests and Measurements 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology. 

A study of psychological tests, with emphasis on proper selection and 
use of testing instruments; also a study of statistical procedures needed in 
the proper use of tests, including measures of central tendency, variability 
and correlation. Messrs. Gray, Johnson. 

PSY 550. Mental Hygiene in Teaching 3-0 

Prerequisite: Four hours in Psychology. 

A survey of mental hygiene principles applicable to teachers and pupils; 
practical problems in prevention and treatment of psychological problems 
in schools; case studies and research. Messrs. Barkley, Corter. 

PSY 565. Industrial Management Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology. 

This course is designed for management personnel in industry and gradu- 
ate students in psychology who wish to familiarize themselves with psy- 
chological approaches to industrial problems. Emphasis will be placed on 
principles and methods for obtaining better utilization of employee resources 
of ideas, attitudes and motivations. Mr. Miller. 

PSY 570. Intelligence and Personality: Theory and Measurement I 3-0 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology. 
An introduction to individual personality and intelligence testing, theo- 
retical background of intelligence and personality. Mr. Corter. 

PSY 571. Intelligence and Personality: Theory and Measurement II 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 570. 

A practicum in individual intelligence testing with emphasis on the 
Wechsler-Bellevue, Stanford-Binet, report writing, and case studies. 

Mr. Corter. 

151 



PSY 572. Intelligence and Personality: Theory and Measurement III 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 570 and 571. 

A practicum in individual personality testing of infants, children and 
adults with emphasis on projective techniques, other tests, report writing, 
case studies, and consultation with teachers. Mr. Corter. 

(Course offered during Summer session only) 

PSY 576. Developmental Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisite: Nine hours in Psychology, including PSY 476 or 475. 

A survey of the role of growth and development in human behavior; 
particularly at the child and adolescent periods. This course will pay par- 
ticular attention to basic principles and theories in the area of develop- 
mental psychology. Mr. Johnson. 

PSY 578. Individual Differences 3-0 

Prerequisite: Four hours in Psychology 

Nature, extent, and practical implications of individual differences and 
individual variation. Mr. Barkley. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PSY 604. Applied Experimental Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 501. 

Experimental analysis of problems of sensation, perception, learning, 
thinking, emotions, fatigue, and neuro-muscular reactions. Emphasis upon 
methods of experimental control, design of experimental apparatus, and 
accuracy of reports as these are related to laboratory investigations in the 
fields of applied psychology. Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman. 

PSY 606. Behavior Theory 3-0 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, a course in learning, experimental psychology, 
and statistics. 

A study of the most fundamental considerations in behavior theory. Such 
topics as criteria of scientific meaningfulness, the nature of scientific ex- 
planation, the application of formal, logical techniques to theory analysis, 
the nature of probability, operationism, intervening variables, etc. will be 
covered. The aim of the course is to develop skill in handling theoretical 
concepts, the ability to analyze and evaluate theories, to deduce hypotheses 
from them, and to devise means of testing them. Mr. Cook. 

PSY 607. Advanced Industrial Psychology I 3-0 

Prerequisites: One undergraduate course beyond general psychology in 
applied or experimental psychology. 

Application of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding 
of industrial behavior. Messrs. Drewes, Gray, Miller. 

PSY 608. Advanced Industrial Psychology II 0-3 

Prerequisites: One undergraduate course beyond general psychology in 
applied or experimental psychology. 

Practical applications of the methods of industrial psychology. 

Messrs. Drewes, Gray, Miller. 

152 



PSY 609. Psychological Clinic Practician Maximum 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology. 

Clinical participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy and 
administration of psychological tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults 
and children. Mr. Corter. 

PSY 610. Theories of Learning 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology. 

A study of theories of learning with emphasis upon applications of the 
principles of learning. Messrs. Barkley, Johnson, Newman. 

PSY 612. Seminar in Industrial Psychology 3 or 3 

Scientific articles, analysis of experimental designs in industrial psy- 
chology, and study of special problems of interest to graduate students in 
Industrial Psychology. Graduate Staff. 

PSY 613. Research in Psychology Credits by arrangement 

Individual or group research problems; a maximum of six credits is 
allowed toward the Master's degree. Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Charles Horace Hamilton, Selz Cabot Mayo. 
Assistant Professor: Glenn C. McCann, James N. Young. 

The Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered 
by the Department of Rural Sociology. 

Graduate students studying for the Ph.D. degree are required to take 
approximately 15 semester hours in the Department of Sociology at the 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Students seeking the 
M.S. degree may take courses at Chapel Hill, but normally will be able to 
complete their entire programs at State College. 

The physical and educational resources of this department which are 
available to graduate students include the following: (1) A departmental 
library of bulletins, monographs, and other materials consisting of several 
thousand items, accumulated over a period of 30 years, and catalogued 
in indexed files; (2) Laboratory equipment consisting of calculating ma- 
chines, drawing table and instruments, chart making materials, cameras, 
typewriters, and statistical aids; (3) Automobiles for use in making field 
surveys; (4) IBM tabulating equipment, operated by the Department of 
Experimental Statistics. 

Providing, as it does, training in a number of social sciences, Rural 
Sociology at State College prepares the graduate student for a wide variety 
of positions. Men and women with graduate degrees in rural sociology have 
opportunities for careers in college teaching, sociological research, social 
statistics, social work, administration of social organizations and govern- 
mental agencies, agricultural journalism, and in those branches of the 
government's foreign service relating to agriculture and the underdeveloped 
areas of the world. 

Institutions offering employment to graduates are: Land-Grant Colleges, 
Agricultural Experiment Stations and Extension Services; the United States 

153 



Departments of Agriculture, State, and Health, Education and Welfare; 
state departments of health, education and welfare; farm journals and 
newspapers; and, voluntary social agencies, such as Red Cross, Community 
Chest, Boy Scouts, and National Tuberculosis Association. 

Each year two or more outstanding graduate students are awarded re- 
search assistantships, usually requiring the devotion of half of their time 
to a research project. Cooperative research work with various govern- 
mental agencies frequently provides part-time employment for graduate 
students. 

Couses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

RS 511. Rural Population Problems 3-0 

Prerequisite: RS 301. 

A study of population growth, rates of change, and distribution. Con- 
siderable attention is given to the functional roles of population, i.e., age, 
sex, race, residence, occupation, marital status, and education. The dynamic 
aspects of population are stressed: fertility, mortality, and migration. 
Population policy is analyzed in relation to national and international goals. 
A world view is stressed throughout. Mr. Mayo. 

RS 513. Community Organization • 3-0 

Prerequisite: RS 301. 

Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about desir- 
able changes in community life. Community needs and resources available 
to meet these needs are studied. Democratic processes in community action 
and principles of community organization are stressed, along with tech- 
niques and procedures. The roles of leaders, both lay and professional, in 
community development are analyzed. Mr. Mayo. 

UNC Philo. 107. Foundations of the Social Sciences 0-3 

(1959-60 and alternate years) 

Prerequisites: Two courses in philosophy, psychology or sociology. 

An inquiry into the nature of social reality through an examination of 
the basic concepts of sociology, history, etc. Behavioral and subjective 
approaches are contrasted. Both methodological and more broadly philo- 
sophical problems are discussed. Mr. Natanson. 

UNC Anthro. 119. Culture and Personality 3-0 

Personality, growth, and child-rearing seen in cross cultural perspective; 
cultural factors explored as they may be related to psychopathology and 
psychotherapy; opportunity will be given for the student to make mean- 
ingful observations of socialization in his own community. 

Mr. Honigmann. 

UNC Soc. 122. Cultural Anthropology 3-0 

A systematic survey of the customs and modes of life of mankind based 
on scientific explanation of the ways of culture. Fee: $1.00. Mr. Johnson. 

UNC Soc. 125. The Negro 0-3 

A study of the Negro community and its relations, status of the Negro 

154 



in American society, problems of race relations, and the process ex integra- 
tion. 

UNC Soc. 128. Folk Cultures in the Modern World 0-3 

(1959-60 and alternate years.) 

The folk culture is viewed as a way of life which stands midway between 
that of the "primitive" tribal native and of the urbanized city dweller. 
Fee: $1.00. 

RS 534. (HI 534.) The Farmers' Movement 0-3 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of sociology. 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United 
States and Canada principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the 
Farmers' Alliance, the Populist revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm 
Bureau, the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, cooperative market- 
ing, government programs, and present problems. Mr. Noblin. 

UNC Soc. 152. History of Social Thought 3-0 

Prerequisite: One course in one of the social sciences or philosophy. 
Emphasis on historic social ideas of Western culture considered against 
a background of general cultural analysis in terms of systematic theory. 

Mr. Vance. 

UNC Soc. 153. Social Structure 3-0 

Analysis of social structure and stratification in terms of class, status, 
prestige, rank, and function. Attention is given to the social role of the 
elite, bureaucracies, and professional and middle classes. Mr. Vance. 

UNC Soc. 161. Sociology of the Family 0-3 

Analysis of the family institution as a background for the study of family 
interaction: socialization and the parent-child relationship, courtship and 
marriage interaction, family crises and problems. Mr. Bowerman. 

UNC Soc. 168. The City 0-3 

The city as a social phenomenon in various cultures. Analysis of urban 
trends, characteristics, and functions of cities with reference to ecology 
and social organization. Sociological elements in housing, urban planning, 
and guided development. Fee: $1.00. Mr. Vance. 

UNC Soc. 181. Regional Sociology of the South 0-3 

A sociological analysis of the southern region of the United States. 
Emphasis on fact, factors, and policies pertaining to geography, population 
and culture; resources and waste; social institutions and planning. Fee: $1.00. 

Mr. Simpson. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

UNC Soc. 210. Folk Sociology 3-0 

Folk sociology as a subject field for the historical study of total human 
society and the empirical study of group behavior. Mr. Simpson. 

RS 611. Research Methods in Sociology 3-0 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology. 

155 



Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature of scientific 
research in sociology. Assesses the nature and purpose of research designs, 
the interrelationship of theory and research, the use of selected techniques 
and their relation to research designs, and the use of modern tabulation 
equipment in research. Mr. McCann. 

UNC Soc. 212. American Sociologists 0-3 

A general treatise on the rise and development of American sociology and 
a survey of the work personalities of American sociologists projected on the 
background of social theory and research. Mr. Simpson. 

UNC Soc. 218. Human Ecology (Seminar) 0-3 

(1960-61 and alternate years.) 

Consideration of theory and research emerging around the concept of 
human ecology. A review of the background of human ecology is followed 
by readings, reports, and research on its contemporary development. Fee: 
$1.00. Mr. Vance. 

UNC Anthro. 220. Theories of Culture 0-3 

(1959-60 and alternate years.) 

A systematic survey of the history in cultural anthropology leading to 
the development of a system of operational principles which the student 
may apply in his own fieldwork and further studies involving cultural 
problems. Fee: $1.00. 

RS 621. Rural Social Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology. 

Treats the genetic development of the rural personality and the inter- 
relationship of the individual and the rural society. Studies the social psy- 
chological factors related to rural leadership, morale, social organization, 
and social change, and examines the attitudes and opinions of rural people 
on current local and national issues. Mr. McCann. 

UNC Anthro. 221. Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology 0-3 

Practical exercises and discussion cover topics of role taking, observation, 
interviewing, note taking, and pattern generalization. Fee: $1.00. 

Mr. Honigmann. 

UNC Anthro. 230. Race and Culture Contacts 0-3 

An analysis of acculturation situations arising from contacts of peoples 
of different racial or cultural heritages in America, Africa, Polynesia, 
Melanesia, and other areas. Mr. Johnson. 

RS 631. Population Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology. 

Methods of describing, analyzing, and presenting data on human popula- 
tions: distribution, characteristics, natural increase, migration, and trends 
in relation to resources. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 632. Rural Family 3-0 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology. 

Emphasis is placed on the development of an adequate sociological frame 
of reference for family analysis; on discovering both the uniquely-cultural 

156 



and common-human aspects of the family by means of cross-cultural com- 
parisons; on historical explanations for variability in American families 
with especial concern for the rural family; and, on analyzing patterns of 
family stability and effectiveness. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 633. The Rural Community 0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology. 

The rural community is viewed in sociological perspective as a functioning 
entity. A method of analysis is presented and applied to eight "dimen- 
sions," with emphasis on the unique types of understanding to be derived 
from measuring each dimension. Finally, the effect of change on community 
integration and development is analyzed. Mr. Mayo. 

UNC Soc. 262. European Sociological Theory 3-0 

The role of theory in sociological research. Analysis and comparison of 
major methodological and theoretical orientations in sociology. Develop- 
ment from European backgrounds of current theories of social differen- 
tiation, social integration, social change, structural-functional analysis and 
social systems analysis. Mr. Simpson. 

UNC Soc. 333. Seminar in Marriage and the Family 3-0 

(1961-62 and alternate years.) Mr. Bowerman. 

UNC Soc. 334. Critique of Research in Marriage and the Family 3-0 

(1960-61 and alternate years.) 

This seminar reviews the basic conceptual frameworks used in family 
research in the past; identifies changing emphasis in family study; and 
evaluates current studies in the major fields of family research. 

Mr. Bowerman. 

UNC Psych. 233. Methods of Investigation in Social Psychology 0-3 

Methods of investigation in social psychology with application to the 
social sciences. Survey methodology with particular emphasis on techniques, 
contributions, and limitations of public opinion polling. Mr. Thibaut. 

RS 641. Statistics in Sociology 3-0 

Prerequisite: Statistics 513. 

The application of statistical methods of sociological research. Emphasis 
on selecting appropriate models, instruments, and techniques for the more 
frequently encountered problems and forms of data. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 642. Research in Rural Sociology Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of chairman of graduate study committee. (Max- 
imum of six credits.) 

Planning and execution of research, and preparation of manuscript under 
supervision of graduate committee. Staff. 

RS 653. Theory and Development of Rural Sociology 0-3 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology. 

Required of all masters and doctoral candidates in rural sociology and is 
recommended for all graduate minors. Designed to meet two objectives: (1) 
to introduce the student to the study of current sociological theory, and (2) 

157 



to survey events and trends in the historical development of rural sociology. 

Mr. Hamilton. 

UNC Religion 270. Sociology of Religion 0-3 

Analysis of tensions between the scientific, ethical, and theological study 
of society; the role of religion in social change; the social origins of the 
denominations; the sociological significance of the Reformation; "sect" and 
"church" in sociological theory. Mr. Nash. 

RS 671. Seminar Credits by arrangement 

Appraisal of current literature; presentation of research papers by stu- 
dents; progress reports on departmental research; review of developing 
research methods and plans; reports from scientific meetings and con- 
ferences; other professional matters. (A maximum of three credits is 
allowed toward the master's degree, and six credits toward the doctorate.) 

Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professor: Sanford Richard Winston. 

Associate Professors: Elmer Hubert Johnston, Horace D. Rawls. 

Assistant Professor: John W. Tomlin. 

No program leading to graduate degrees is offered in sociology and an- 
thropology as such at State College. The course of work listed below is ac- 
ceptable for graduate credit as part of a program in some other area of 
graduate study. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

SOC 401. Human Relations in Industrial Society 3 or 3 

Selected societies about the world are contrasted with American society to demonstrate the 
correlation between technology and general behavior patterns, both within industry and in 
the total social order. The patterns of adjustment by the individual to the organizational 
framework (business concern, manufacturing enterprise, etc.) are analyzed in terms of so- 
cial status, social roles, work norms, and attitudes. The social significance of major charac- 
teristics of contemporary industry is considered in terms of such topics as enlargement of 
the geographic bounds of the human community, development of occupational specialization, 
alteration of the character of inter-group interaction, and the growing integration of Amer- 
ican culture. The interrelationships between industry and social change are discussed to show 
the effect of new social conditions upon industrial operations and the effect of technological 
change upon the family, school, church, and government. The contribution of industry to 
social progress is analyzed to promote the student's understanding of the dynamic quality 
of the social environment within which he will function. 

SOC 402. Urban Sociology 3 or 3 

The course begins with a study of the factors behind the organic growth of cities. The 
relationship between the physical design of cities and their socnil organization is discussed. 
This is followed by a detailed analysis of new developments in the serving of human needs 
(adequate housing, and the design of physical and social structures for religious, educational, 
public welfare, and recreational activities). Socio-psychological aspects of life in an urbanized 
society are compared with those of predominantly agi-icultural societies. The increasing 
integration nf urban and rural living is emphasized. Finally, the changing character of 
urban life is seen in the resulting demand for city and regional planning and the use of 
administrative personnel having both technical and social backgrounds. 

SOC 411. Community Relationships 3 or 3 

A survey of the institutions, organizations, and agencies to be found in modern com- 
munities; the social conditions or problems, such as recreation, health, welfare, etc., with 
which they deal ; their inter-relationship and the trend toward over-all planning. 

SOC 412. Introduction to Social Work 3 or 3 

An introductory course, designed to acquaint students with the various types of public 

158 



and private social work and with remedial and preventive programs in applied sociology, 
social psychiatry, health, public welfare, and recreation. 

SOC 414. Social Structure 3 or 3 

Studies of the major social institutions and systems of stratification; the organization 
of social systems as, for example, religion, education, and government ; the functions of 
such structural components as age and sex groups, vocational and professional groups, and 
social classes. Messrs. Winston, Johnson. 

SOC 416. Research Methods 3 or 8 

An analysis of the principle methods of social research; the development of experiments; 
schedules and questionnaires ; the measurement of behavior. Messrs. Winston, Johnson. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SOC 501. Leadership 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or equivalent. 

A study of leadership in various fields of American life: analysis of the 
various factors associated with leadership; techniques of leadership. Par- 
ticular attention is given to recreational, scientific, and executive leader- 
ship procedures. Mr. Winston. 

SOC 502. Society, Culture, and Personality 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or equivalent. 

Human personality is studied from its origins in primary groups through 
its development in secondary contacts and its ultimate integration with 
social norms. While comparative anthropological materials will be drawn 
upon, emphasis is placed upon the normal personality and the adjustment 
of the individual to our society and to our culture. The dynamics of per- 
sonality and character structure are analyzed in terms of the general 
culture patterns and social institutions of society. 

Messrs. Rawls, Winston. 

SOC 505. The Sociology of Rehabilitation 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or equivalent. 

The course stresses the social and cultural implications of the rehabilita- 
tion approach. Emphasis is placed upon the social and personal problems 
of physically and mentally handicapped persons. The interrelationships of 
the major social environments are considered at length in this regard. Ob- 
jectives of the rehabilitation processes are analyzed in terms of the sociol- 
ogy of work. A major portion of the course is devoted to rehabilitation as a 
profession, particular attention being given to the diverse roles of special- 
ists in this field. Mr. Rawls. 

SOC 510. Industrial Sociology 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or equivalent. 

Industrial relations are analyzed as group behavior with a complex and 
dynamic network of rights, obligations, sentiments, and rules. This social 
system is viewed as an interdependent part of total community life. The 
background and functioning of industrialism are studied as social and 
cultural phenomena. Specific social problems of industry are analyzed. 

Mr. Johnson. 

SOC 511. Social Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of sociology, or equivalent work in 
related fields, and permission of instructor. 

The study of social theories from the earliest recorded thinkers to those 

159 



of modern times; the evolution of theories of the individual, groups, cul- 
ture, community, and society; the modern development of sociology and 
anthropology, and interpretive systems accompanying these developments. 

Graduate Staff. 

SOC 515. Research in Applied Sociology 3-3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or equivalent. 

Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such as prob- 
lems of the family, population, and social work; rural-urban relations; 
student success; American leadership. Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOILS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: James Walter Fitts, Head, William Victor Bartholomew, 

Nathaniel Terry Coleman, James Fulton Lutz, Willie Garland 

Woltz, William Walton Woodhouse, Jr. 
Associate Professors: Eugene J. Kamprath, Charles B. McCants, Ralph 

Joseph McCracken, Adolph Mehlich, Richard J. Volk. 
Assistant Professors: William A. Jackson, Robert E. McCollum, Preston 

Harding Reid, Sterling B. Weed. 

The Department of Soils offers training leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following fields: Soil Chemistry, 
Soil Fertility, Soil Physics and Soil Genesis. 

Excellent facilities are provided for soils graduate teaching and research 
in Williams Hall, a large modern building. Adequate office and labora- 
tory space is assigned to each student. Numerous facilities available for 
use in carrying on a program of graduate study include special preparation 
rooms for soil and plants samples, cold storage space, radioactive and stable 
isotope laboratories, and service laboratories for routine soil and plant 
analyses. A departmental library is equipped with books, periodicals and 
bibliographic material relative to soils and related subjects. Seminars and 
analyses. A departmental library is equipped with books, periodicals and 
seminar room. Spacious greenhouses are situated at the rear of Williams 
Hall and are provided with benches, tables, lights and other essential equip- 
ment. Outdoor experiments in concrete frames, large tile, or small plots 
can be conducted in an area in close proximity to Williams Hall. Field ex- 
periments can be made on the seventeen research farms owned or oper- 
ated by the state. These farms are located throughout North Carolina to 
include a wide variety of soil and climatic conditions needed for experi- 
ments in soils. One of the largest and best equipped soil testing laboratories 
in the United States is operated by the North Carolina Department of 
Agriculture in Raleigh. Special studies on the various problems of soil 
testing can be made in conjunction with this laboratory. 

Strong supporting departments greatly increase the graduate student's 
opportunities for a broad and thorough training. Included among those de- 
partments in which graduate students in Soils work cooperatively or obtain 
instructions are Field Crops, Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, 
Plant Pathology, Physics, and Statistics. 

160 



Many opportunities in reserach, teaching, extension and in commerical 
fields are available to well trained students in Soils. The recipients of ad- 
vanced degrees in Soils from North Carolina State College are found in re- 
sponsible positions throughout the world. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SOI 511. Soil Physics 4-0 

Prerequisites: SOI 20O and PY 212. 

Physical constitution and analysis; soil structure, soil water, soil air, and 
soil temperature in relation to plant growth. Mr. Lutz. 

SOI 521. Soil Chemistry 4-0 

Prerequisites: SOI 341, CH 212, and CH 532. 

Chemical composition and properties of soil, particularly concerning 
clay mineralogy, chemical processes of weathering, and chemical proper- 
ties of clays. The laboratory is concerned with procedures for the separation 
and identification of soil constituents and studies of certain fundamental 
properties of clay systems. Mr. Weed. 

SOI 522. Soil Chemistry (Biochemical) 0-4 

Prerequisites: SOI 341, CH 212, CH 532. 

Theoretical basis for the application of stable isotopes and mass spectro- 
metry to soil-plant research. Surface chemistry of inorganic and organic 
soil colloids. Physicochemical concepts of ion exchange phenomena in soils 
and the dynamic equilibrium associated with nutrient uptake by plant roots. 
Laboratory consists of exercises in mass spectrometry and ion exchange 
to illustrate fundamental principles. Mr. Volk. 

SOI 532. Soil Microbiology 0-3 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, BO 412, 421. 

The more important microbiological processes that occur in soils; de- 
composition of organic materials, ammonification, nitrification and nitrogen 
fixation. Mr. Bartholomew. 

SOI 551. Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification 4-0 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, CH 212, MIG 120. 

Morphology; Study of concepts of soil horizons and soil profiles and 
chemical, physical and mineralogical parameters useful in characterizing 
them. Genesis: Critical study of soil forming factors and processes. Classi- 
fication: Critical evaluation of historical development and present concepts 
of soil taxonomy with particular reference to Great Soil Groups as well as 
discussion of logical basis of soil classification. Laboratory comprises field 
trips for study of soil profiles representative of Great Soil Groups present 
in North Carolina, and a number of exercises illustrating methods of study 
of soil Morphology. Mr. McCracken. 

SOI 570. Special Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, CH 212. 

Special problem in various phases of Soils. Problems may be selected or 
will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current 
research. Graduate Staff. 

161 



Courses for Graduates Only* 

SOI 622. Advanced Soil Chemistry Semester by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: SOI 521, 522. 

A critical examination of current ideas in Soil Chemistry and related 
fields. Topics will include ion exchange, ionic and molecular absorption, 
electrokinetics, relations between the structures of mineral and organic 
soil components and their chemical and physical properties. 

Mr. Coleman. 

SOI 632. Advanced Soil Microbiology Semester by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: SOI 522, 532, CH 421, 422. Max. 4 

A critical examination of information relating to the nature and value 
of microbiological processes in soil. Segments of the course will be devoted 
to: (1) Formation, chemical composition and biological stability of soil 
organic matter; (2) Biological transformations of nitrogen; (3) Function 
of organic matter in soil; (4) Factors influencing nitrogen fixation; and (5) 
Plant-microbial relationships. Mr. Bartholomew. 

SOI 642. Advanced Soil Fertility 0-3 

Prerequisites: SOI 511, 521, 522. 

Soil conditions affecting crop growth; the chemistry of soil and plant 
interrelationships, theoretical and applied aspects of fertilizer usage in 
relation to plant nutrition. Mr. Fitts. 

SOI 651. Advanced Soil Genesis and Classification 2-3, By Arrangement 
Prerequisites: SOI 511, 521, 551. f or s 

A critical study of current theories and concepts in soil genesis and 
morphology; detailed study of soil taxonomy. Topics include weathering 
and clay mineral genesis as related to soil morphology and genesis, func- 
tional analyses of soil genesis, properties of and processes responsible for 
soil profiles formed under various sets of soil forming factors, classification 
theory and logic as applied to soil classification, structure of soil classifi- 
cation schemes. Any of these topics may be emphasized at the expense of 
the others according to interests of students. Mr. McCracken. 

SOI 680. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to agronomists reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits allowed towards the master's degree but any 
number towards the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

SOI 690. Research Credit by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils. 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any 
number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 



• Students are expected to consult the instructor before registration. 

162 



DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS (EXPERIMENTAL) 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Jackson Ashcraft Rigney, Head, Richard Loree Anderson, 
Columbus Clark Cockerham, Gertrude Mary Cox, Alva Leroy 
Finkner, Robert John Hader, Henry Laurence Lucas, Jr., David 
Dickenson Mason, Robert James Monroe, Harold Frank Robinson. 

Associate Professors: Arnold Herbert Edward Grandage, Francis Ed- 
ward McVay. 

Assistant Professors: Melvin Winsor Carter, Jack Fleischer, William 
Wesley Garry Smart, Jr. 

The Department of Experimental Statistics offers work leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. There is a working 
arrangement with the Department of Biostatistics in the University's School 
of Public Health at Chapel Hill, whereby their graduate students can major 
in Experimental Statistics and minor in the Division of Health Affairs. The 
Department of Experimental Statistics maintains a close liaison with 
the Department of (Mathematical) Statistics at Chapel Hill in order to 
strengthen the offerings in statistical theory. (See U. N. C. courses listed 
below.) Introductory courses of these two departments are coordinated 
so that it is easy for a beginning statistics graduate student to transfer 
from one institution of the Consolidated University to another. Both de- 
partments are affiliated with the Institute of Statistics (See page 25). 

The Department has at least one staff member who consults with re- 
searchers in each of the following fields and who conducts his own research 
on statistical problems which are encountered: the various agricultural 
sciences, quantitative genetics, industry and engineering, physical sciences 
and social sciences. In addition there is active research in the general 
fields of experimental design and sample surveys. A graduate student who 
majors in Experimental Statistics may specialize in any one of these fields 
of interest with his minor in the associated department; or with a strong 
mathematical background he may prefer to minor in mathematics or mathe- 
matical statistics. For the graduate student who wishes to minor in sta- 
tistics, the Department has developed a curriculum tailored to his needs. 
Many employers are offering added inducements for research personnel 
who have such a minor. The Department maintains close cooperation with 
other graduate departments in order to provide the type of courses needed 
for their students and to provide a staff to participate in their graduate 
programs. 

In addition to its consulting services, the Department also provides a 
computing service for the Agricultural Experiment Station and for other 
research departments on the campus and in the State. It furnishes several 
federal agencies and private concerns with research and consulting services 
on a contract basis. All of this work supplies a wealth of live problems 
on which graduate students acquire experience and maturity. 

The Department of Experimental Statistics is located in Patterson Hall, 
adjacent to the new D. H. Hill Library, which has copies of most important 
statistical books and periodicals. The reprint files of several staff members 
are available for the use of graduate students. A fully equipped IBM 

163 



Laboratory, including an IBM 650 electronic digital computer, is maintained 
for research and instruction, and automatic desk calculators are also avail- 
able. 

The Department has approximately 20 graduate assistantships at stipends 
adjusted to the previous training and experience of the recipients. 

Most fields of research, development, production and distribution are 
seeking persons trained in statistical theory and methods. The demand is 
equally strong from universities, agricultural and engineering experi- 
mental stations, national defense agencies, other federal agencies, and a 
wide variety of industrial concerns. There is a need for experimental statis- 
ticians with the master's degree as well as for those with the doctorate. 
With so few institutions now providing the type of statistical training 
available at North Carolina State College, there is no hope of satisfying 
this demand for years to come. 

At the request of the Southern Regional Education Board's Advisory 
Commission on Statistics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Oklahoma State 
University, the University of Florida, and North Carolina State College have 
joined in a continuing program of graduate summer sessions in statistics, 
held at the four institutions in rotation. In 1960 the host institution is the 
University of Florida, followed by Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Okla- 
homa State University. Each of the sponsoring institutions will accept the 
credits earned by students in the summer sessions as residence credit. The 
courses are arranged to provide consecutive work in successive summers. 
Information regarding these courses may be obtained from any of the 
cooperating statistical departments or the Deans of the Graduate Schools. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

*ST 511. Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences, I 4 or 4 

Prerequisites: ST 311 or graduate standing. 

Basic concepts of statistical models and use of samples; variation, statisti- 
cal measures, distributions, tests of significance, analysis of variance 
and elementary experimental design, regression and correlation, Chi-square. 

Messrs. Monroe, Carter. 

*ST 512. Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences, II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 511. 

Covariance, multiple regression, factorial experiments, individual degrees 
of freedom, incomplete block designs, experiments repeated over space and 
time. Mr. Mason. 

ST 513. Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences, I 4-0 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or graduate standing. 

Basic concepts in collection and analysis of data. Variability of sample 
data, distributions, confidence limits, Chi-square, t-test, analysis of vari- 
ance, regression, correlation, analytic and descriptive surveys, experimental 
designs, index numbers. Mr. McVay. 

fST 514. Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences, II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 513. 
Extension of basic concepts of experimental statistics to social surveys 

'Offered in special summer sessions at the University of Florida (1960), and Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute (1961). 

tOffered in special summer session at University of Florida (1960). 

164 



and experiments. Sampling from finite populations; sampling systems, un- 
restricted, stratified and multistage; random and systematic selection with 
varying probabilities; methods of estimation; analysis of variance with 
multiple classifications; covariance; multiple regression; polynomials. 

Mr. Fleischer. 

ST 515, 516. Experimental Statistics for Engineers 3 or 4-3 

Prerequisite: ST 361 or graduate standing. 

General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in 
engineering, textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability, distributions, meas- 
urement of precision, simple and multiple regression, tests of significance, 
analysis of variance, enumeration data, sensitivity data, life testing experi- 
ments and experimental design. 

One credit optional laboratory available first semester only. 

Mr. Hader. 

*ST 521, 522. Basic Statistical Theory 4-4 

Prerequisites: ST 311 or graduate standing and undergraduate calculus. 

Probability, frequency distributions and moments; sampling distributions; 
introductory theory of point and interval estimation; parametric and 
non-parametric tests of hypotheses; theory of least squares; multiple re- 
gression; analysis of variance and covariance, variance components. 

This course contains the theory needed in all advanced courses in sta- 
tistical analysis and some of the fundamentals for advanced theory courses. 

Graduate Staff. 

ST 591. Special Problems 1 to 3 - 1 to 3 

Development of techniques for specialized cases, particularly in con- 
nection with thesis and practical consulting problems. Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 111. Methods of Mathematical Statistics, I. 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

Introductory treatment of special mathematical techniques of particular 
importance in probability and statistics, including topics from combinatorial 
mathematics, Fourier and LaPlace transforms, contour integration, special 
inequalities and finite differences. Mr. Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 131. Elementary Probability 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

Logical foundations and axiomatic treatment of probability, conditional 
probability, additive and multiplicative laws, Bayes' theorem and inverse 
probability, binomial and Poisson distributions, moments and moment 
generating functions, law of large numbers and central limit theorem, 
convolution of distributions. Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 132. Intermediate Probability 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 131 or 134. 

Laws of large numbers, characteristic functions, and central limit 
theorems. Elements of stochastic processes and their applications, including 
random walks, Markov chains, recurrent events, Brownian motion, and 
elementary queuing theory. Mr. Smith 

* Offered in special summer sessions at the Universi'y of Florida (U)60>, and Virginia 
Po'ytechnic Institute (1961). 

165 



U.N.C. ST 133. Least Squares and Time Series 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 134 and Matrix Algebra 

The classical method of least squares with modern improvements and 
developments, interpretations of the results in terms of probability, appli- 
cations to social and to natural sciences, the problem of observations ordered 
in time, correlation and regression of time series, seasonal variation and 
secular trends, methods of correcting for lack of independence and of 
avoiding fallacies. 

U.N.C. ST 134. Statistical Theory I 5-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

Relative-frequency and axiomatic definitions of probability. The concept 
of a random sample. Additive and multiplicative laws. Univariate and 
multivariate, marginal and conditional distributions. Discrete and conti- 
nuous cases. Moments, cumulants, generating functions. Transformation 
of variables. Introduction to tests of simple hypotheses and interval esti- 
mates. Model building. Special distributions: binomial, Poisson normal, etc. 
Law of large numbers. Central limit theorem. Order statistics. Multinomial 
distribution theory. Chi-square. Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 135. Statistical Theory II 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 134. 

Distributions of functions of random normal samples. F and t distri- 
butions. Point estimation. Properties of estimators, maximum likelihood. 
Information. Cramer-Rao inequality. Interval estimation. Neyman-Pearson 
tests of hypotheses. Likelihood ratio tests. Contingency tables. Chi-square 
tests of goodness of fit. Elements of decision theory and sequential and 
non-parametric inferences. 

U.N.C. ST 144. Correlation, Contingency, and Chi Tests 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135; Corequisite: Matrix Algebra 
Elements of the theory of testing composite hypotheses. Multivariate 
normal populations, total, partial and multiple correlations. Singular multi- 
variate distributions. Tests of independence, homogeneity, and goodness of 
fit. Contingency tables; exact tests for independence and the Chi approxima- 
tion. Many-dimensional contingency tests. Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 150. Analysis of Variance with Application to Experimental 
Designs 0-3 

Prerequisite: Matrix Algebra; Corequisite: U.N.C. ST 135. 

Unified mathematical theory for the analysis of data from experimental 
designs. Applications to lattice designs, balanced and partially balanced 
incomplete block designs, Latin and Youden squares; modification for miss- 
ing plots; intra-block and inter-block analysis; split plot and factorial 
designs; analysis of factorial designs in the case of total or partial con- 
founding; use of concomitant information; analysis of covariance with the 
general linear model; analysis of multiple classified data with unequal 
numbers in different cells; general theory of components of variance 
including mixed models; principles guiding the selection of a design. 

Mr. Bose. 



166 



U.N.C. ST 182. Mathematical Economics 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus; co-requisite: Matrix Algebra. 

Pei'fect and imperfect competition, monopoly, utility vs. ranking of 
preferences, relations between commodities, general equilibrium, effects 
of taxes and controls of various kinds, index numbers. 

Offered in fall of 1960-1961 and alternate years. Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 183. Advanced Mathematical Economics 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 182 and Differential Equations. 

Dynamic variations in the economy; calculus of variations and stochastic 
process theory with applications to economic problems; valuation, deprecia- 
tion, and depletion; most profitable rates of exploitation of mineral and 
biological resources. 

Offered in spring of 1960-1961 and alternate years. Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 197. Population Statistics. 0-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Training in techniques for quantitative research with population data. 
Composition characteristics, population estimates, computation and stand- 
ardization of birth and death rates, construction and application of life 
tables, measurement of migration. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ST 611, 612. Intermediate Statistical Theory 3-3 

Prerequisites: ST 522, Advanced Calculus and Matrix Theory. 

This course will provide the additional theory, above that of ST 521-522, 
needed for advanced theory courses. Many of the topics of ST 521-522 will 
be developed more rigorously, and more attention will be paid to mathe- 
matical aspects. Advanced probability theory; central limit theorem, law 
of large numbers, bivariate normal distributions, convergence theorems. 
Theory of estimation; method of maximum likelihood, efficient estimates, 
simultaneous confidence regions; general theory of tests of hypotheses, 
general linear hypothesis, sequential tests of hypotheses, distribution-free 
methods. Graduate Staff. 

ST 621. Statistics in Animal Science 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 512. 

Sources and magnitudes of errors in experiments with animals, experi- 
mental designs and methods of analysis adapted to specific types of ani- 
mal research, relative efficiency of alternate designs, amount of data re- 
quired for specified accuracy, student reports on selected topics. 

Offered in fall of 1961-62 and alternate years. Mr. Lucas. 

ST 622. Principles of Biological Assays 
(See AI 622.) 

ST 623. Statistics in Plant Science 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 512. 

Principles and techniques of planning, establishing, and executing field 
and greenhouse experiments. Size, shape and orientation of plots; border 
effects; selection of experimental material; estimation of size of experi- 

167 



merits for specified accuracy; scoring and subjective tests; subsampling 
plots and yields for laboratory analysis. Mr. Mason. 

ST 626. Statistical Concepts in Genetics 0-3 

Prerequisites: Genetics 512, and ST 512 unless taken concurrently. 
Factors bearing on rates of change in population means and variances, 
with special reference to cultivated plants and domestic animals; selection, 
inbreeding, magnitude and nature of genotypic and non-genotypic varia- 
bility; experimental and statistical approaches in the analysis of quantita- 
tive inheritance. Mr. Cockerham. 

ST 631. Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 512 or 514 or 516. 

Basic theory of sampling from a finite population. Confidence limits and 
estimation of optimum sample size, comparison of different sample de- 
signs, methods and probabilities for selection and methods of estimation, 
choice of a sampling unit, double sampling, matched samples. 

Mr. Finkner. 

ST 641. (RS 641) Statistics in Sociology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 513. 

The application of statistical methods in sociological research. Emphasis 
on selecting appropriate models, instruments and techniques for the more 
frequently encountered problems and forms of data. Mr. Hamilton. 

ST 651. (AGC 651). Econometric Methods I. 0-3 

Prerequisites: ST 514, ST 521, and AGC 642. 

Decision-making under uncertainty; stochastic elements in economic 
theories; problems of model construction; special techniques for analyzing 
simultaneous economic relations. Graduate Staff. 

ST 652. (AGC 652). Econometric Methods II 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 522, and AGC 641. 

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of significance as applied to eco- 
nomic data; empirical sampling methods; non-parametric methods; sequen- 
tial testing; extension of least squares methods to research in economics; 
production surfaces; special topics in variance components and mixed 
models; use of experimental designs in economic research; elements of 
multivariate analysis; techniques for analysis of time series. 

Mr. Anderson. 

ST 661. Advanced Special Problems 1 to 3—1 to 3 

Prerequisite: ST 522. 

Any new advance in the field of statistics which can be presented in 
lecture series as unique opportunities arise. 

Graduate Faculty, Visiting Professors. 

ST 671. Advanced Statistical Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 512, ST 522. 

General computational methods for linear regression, non-orthogonal 
data, carryover effects, orthogonal polynomials, response surfaces, non- 
168 



linear systems, variance components for orthogonal and non-orthogonal 
data. Mr. Anderson. 

ST 672. Special Advanced Topics in Statistical Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 671. 

Regression analysis with errors in both variables, transformations, enu- 
meration data, discriminant functions, heterogeneous errors, non-parametric 
analysis. Mr. Monroe. 

ST 674. Advanced Topics in Construction and Analysis of Experimental 
Designs 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 512 and ST 522. 

Inter-block analysis of incomplete blocks designs, partially balanced de- 
signs, confounding, data collected at several places and times, multiple 
factor designs, change-over trials, analysis of groups of means. 

Miss Cox. 

ST 681. Seminar 1-1 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but 
any number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

ST 691. Research Credits by arrangement 

A maximum of nine credits is allowed toward the master's degree; no 
limitation on credits in doctorate programs. Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 200. Applied Multivariate Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135. 

The general multivariate model for experimental work; relations between 
multiple regression, analysis of variance and multivariate analysis; factor 
analysis; the generalized variance; the generalized Student ratio; intra- 
class correlations; testing compound symmetry between two sample covari- 
ance matrices; scale analysis; cannonical correlation, testing for the rank 
of a correlation matrix. 

Offered in fall of 1960-61 and alternate years. Mr. Nicholson.; 

U.N.C. ST 202. Methods of Operations Research 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135. 

Linear programming, theory of games, techniques for analyzing waiting 
lines and queues; applied probability; recent developments, applications of 
results to specific problems; case studies. Mr. Nicholson. 

U.N.C. ST 204. Selected Techniques of Approximation 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus. 

The methods of steepest descent and other methods of approximating 
integrals with special attention to integrals occurring in probability and 
statistics; asymptotic series; large-sample appproximations; orthogonal 
polynomials and their applications to numerical quadrature, interpolation 
and moment problems. 

Offered in fall of 1961-62 and alternate years. Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 210. Design and Analysis of Experiments 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 512 and U.N.C. ST 150. 

The principles of the design and analysis of experiments with applica- 

169 



tions, randomization, replication, local control. Randomized blocks, Latin 
and Graeco-Latin squares, factorial experiments. Confounding, fractional 
factorials, response surface designs, recent developments. 

Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 212. Methods of Mathematical Statistics, II. 0-3 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus. 

Measure and integration theory, with special reference to random vari- 
ables, distribution functions, and probability measures, and including Fubini's 
Theorem, the Radon-Nikodym Theorem, conditional probability, conditional 
expectation, and modes of convergence. Mr. Hall. 

U.N.C. ST 220. Theory of Estimation and Hypothesis Testing 4-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, 135 and 212. 

Sufficient statistics. Unbiased estimates with minimum variance. Prop- 
erties of tests — power, similarity, unbiasedness, sampling economy, etc. 
Admissible, Bayes and minimax estimates and tests. Invariance. Large 
sample theory. Confidence sets. Multi-decision problems. Mr. Hall. 

U.N.C. ST 221. Sequential Analysis 2-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132 and 135. 

Estimation and testing when the sample size depends on the observa- 
tions. Double sampling. Inverse sampling. Sequential probability ratio tests. 
Stochastic approximation methods. Mr. Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 222. Nonparametric Inference 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, 135 and 212. 

Estimation and testing when the functional form of the population dis- 
tribution is unknown. Rank and sign tests, tests based on permutations of 
observations, power of nonparametric tests, optimum nonparametric tests 
and estimators, nonparametric confidence intervals and tolerance limits. 

Mr. Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 231. Advanced Probability 3-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132 and 212. 

Advanced theoretic course, including: random variables and expectations, 
distributions and characteristic functions, infinitely divisible distributions, 
central limit theorems, laws of large numbers, and stable laws. 

Offered in fall of 1960-61 and alternate years. Mr. Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 232. General Theory of Statistical Decision 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 135 and 212. 

Selected topics in the general theory of statistical decisions, based on the 
work of Abraham Wald. 

Offered in spring of 1060-61 and alternate years. Mr. Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 235. Stochastic Processes 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132 and 212. 

Advanced theoretic course, including: separability of a process, pro- 
cesses with orthogonal random variables, Markov processes, martingales, 
and processes with independent increments. 

Offered in spring of 1961-62 and alternate years. 

Messrs. Smith and Hoeffding. 

170 



U.N.C. ST 237. Time Series Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 133. 

Analysis of data involving trends, seasonal variations, cycles and serial 
correlations; periodograms and correlograms; exogenous and endogenous 
cycles; stochastic difference equations; tests for randomness; distributions 
of serial correlation coefficients; the sinusoidal limit theorem. 

Offered in spring of 1961-62 and alternate years. Mr. Hotelling. 

3 or 3 

U.N.C. ST 251. Combinatorial Problems of the Design of Experiments 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 150 and 210. 

Application of methods of modern algebra and finite geometry to prob- 
lems arising in the design of experiments. Construction of orthogonal sets 
of Latin squares, construction of balanced and partially balanced designs, 
proofs of non-existence of certain classes of designs, construction of con- 
founded factorial designs, fractional replications, orthogonal arrays and 
multifactorial designs. Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 260. Multivariate Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 135 and Matrix Algebra. 

Tests and confidence intervals in multivariate analysis of variance, as- 
sociation between subsets of a multivariate normal set, the rank of a matrix, 
factor analysis. Mr. Roy. 

U.N.C. ST 261. Advanced Multivariate Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 260. 

Distribution problems connected with the tests and confidence intervals 
discussed in ST 260; the power functions of the tests and the shortness of 
the confidence intervals against different classes of alternatives; some 
applications, especially to problems in sociology, psychology and anthro- 
pology. Mr. Roy. 

U.N.C. ST 321-322. Special Problems 3-3 

Statistical theory of multi-factor and multi-response experiments with 
responses not necessarily "normal." Mr. Roy. 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Professors: Malcolm Eugene Campbell, Dean, Clarence Monroe Asbill, 
Jr., John Francis Bogdan, Kenneth Stoddard Campbell, Elliot 
Brown Grover, Dame Scott Hamby, Harley Y. Jennings, Edward 
Anne Murray, William A. Newell, Henry Ames Rutherford, 
William Edward Shinn, and Benjamin Lincoln Whittier. 

Visiting Professor: Charles F. Goldthwait. 

Associate Professors: David Marshall Cates, Arthur Courtney Hayes, 
Joseph Alexander Porter, Jr. 

Assistant Professor: Ernest B. Berry. 

The School of Textiles offers two graduate degrees: Master of Science 
in Textile Technology and Master of Science in Textile Chemistry. The 



171 



graduate student in Textile Technology may carry on his major work in 
one of the following fields: Fiber and Yarn Technology, Knitting Tech- 
nology, Synthetics, Fabric Development, or Quality Control. 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School for work in textiles 
must possess a Bachelor of Science degree in Textiles or its equivalent, 
in addition to satisfying the general requirements for admission. 

The physical resources of the School of Textiles are at the disposal of 
our graduate students. Separate research laboratories for both physical 
and chemical investigations are provided for the use of graduate students 
and the specialized equipment of the Textile Research Department also is 
available for graduate research. The textile equipment and testing instru- 
ments available at the School of Textiles are of such quality and variety 
that almost any type of textile problem can be investigated thoroughly. 
A large and representative textile library is one of the important facilities 
available for graduate study. 

The unprecedented development of synthetic fibers currently underway 
has opened a tremendous field for the textile scientist and technologist. 
Fiber producers need men trained to conduct systematic investigations 
which lead to product development and improvement. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 
Fiber and Yarn Technology 

TX 401. Tarn Manufacture IV 4 or 4 

Prerequisite: TX 301. 

Required of seniors in Tarn Manufacturing and General Textiles Options. Elective 
for others. 

Refinements on yarn production, such as detailed studies of carding: production levels; 
comber types, settings, and quality aspects ; modern drafting assemblies. Review of all 
yarn mill calculations. Production of novelty yarn, and special yarns such as voile, crepe. 
Special techniques and problems ; types of winders ; large package production, types of 
travelers and rings ; operation schedules. Lab project in small groups. 

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Stuckey. 

TX 402. Mill Technology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: TX 301. 

Required of seniors in Tarn Manufacturing and Synthetics Options. Elective for others. 

Mill Layout: Layout of textile mill of cotton or synthetics type. Types of machines, num- 
bers, and balance of equipment. Floor layout plans and process flow, speeds, productions, 
help layout, power and investment. 

Three 1-hour lectures per week. Messrs. Grover, Pardue. 

TX 411. Wool Manufacture I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: TX 301. 

Required of seniors in Tarn Manufacturing and General Textiles Options. Elective for 
others. 

Raw materials used in wool and worsted trades ; classification, structure, and charac- 
teristics of fibers, grading, sorting and mixing. Reclamed wool and secondary raw ma- 
terials. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory applications. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Pardue. 

TX 424. Development Project 0-2 

Prerequisite: TX 327 and ST 361 or equivalent. 

Required of seniors in Quality Control Option. 

Studies are conducted independently on assigned problems, and seminars are held on 
applications and administration of testing, quality control and development. Studies and 
discussion of budgeting and evaluation of priority and progress. Current technical de- 
velopments are discussed. Results of project to be written in form of a technical report 
from a control and development laboratory. 

One 4-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. D. S. Hamby and Staff. 

TX 431. Synthetics I 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: TX 281. . . , „ «. _. 

Required of seniors in General Textiles, Weaving and Designing, and Tarn Manufac- 
turing options. 

A general course including: textile processing of continuous filament synthetic yarns 

172 



in the yarn producing plants ; preparation of yarns for weaving and knitting including 
crepe, voile and hosiery yarns ; the application of synthetic yarns for use as industrial 
yarns and fabrics ; also, calculations involving the denier system and production. No credit 
allowed for students majoring in synthetics. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Wiggins. 

TX 433. Synthetics II 4-0 

Prerequisite: TX 281 and senior standing. 

Required of seniors in Synthetics Option. 

An advanced study of the physical properties and the relation of physical properties 
to the processing characteristics and end product performances of the synthetic fibers. A 
study of the influence of twist on physical properties of filament yarns : comprehensive 
studies of the processing of sized and unsized filament yarn as encountered in the throw- 
ing industry and in preparation for knitting and weaving. A study of the industrial uses 
of synthetic fibers and the requirements of such uses. 

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Wiggins. 

TX 435. Synthetic Fiber Processing 4 or 4 

Prerequisites: TX 301. 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing and Synthetic Options. 

Elective for others. 

Studies of the contributions of individual fibers to the entire blend covering both the 
man-made as well as natural fibers. Processng of man-made fibers into spun yarn and 
fabric, particularly on the cotton system. The processing of man-made fibers by new meth- 
ods, such as by direct spinning and the Pacific Converter. Studies of the modification of 
machines for processing synthetic fibers alone or in blend with other fibers. 

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby. Pardue. 

Knitting Technology 

TX 441. Flat Knitting 3-0 

Prerequisite : TX 341. 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option. Elective for others. 

A study of the leading types of flat knitting machines including warp knitting ma- 
chines, design possibilities, and fabric adaptability. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Shinn. 

TX 443. Knitting Mechanics 3-0 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option. Elective for others. 

Mathematics and mechanics of flat and rib knitting. Inter-relation of yarn number, 
yarn diameter, gauge, cut, stitch, length, fabric structure and weight ; proportions of 
yarns in multipl<=-thread work ; production problems, etc. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Shinn. 

TX 444. Garment Manufacture 0-3 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option. Elective for others. 
A study of circular latch needle and spring needle machines for knit fabric production 

styling, cutting and seaming of the basic garment types for underwear and outerwear ; 

standard seam types : high-speed sewiner machines. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Shinn, Lewis. 

TX 445. Full-fashioned Hosiery Manufacture 0-2 

TX 447,448. Knitting Laboratory II 2-2 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option. Elective for others. 

Mechanics of the full-fashioned hosiery machine including practical training in its ad- 
justment and operation. Attention is given to yarn preparation, knitting, inspection, finish- 
ing and packaging hosiery. 

One 4-hour laboratory period per week each semester. Mr. Shinn. 

TX 449. Tricot Knitting 0-3 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option. Elective for others. 
A study of basic types of tricot knitting machines with emphasis on mechanisms and 
fabrics. Attention is given to warp preparation methods applicable to the tricot machine, 
the characteristics of yarns made from natural and synthetic fibers as they affect proc- 
essing into warp knittted fabrics, machine settings for proper qualities and ratios ; 
economics of warp knitting, and end uses. Attention is given to fabric design and analysis. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week. Mr. Shinn. 

Fabric Development 

TX 451. Weaving Laboratory IV 1 or 1 

Prerequisite: TX 351 and TX 361. 

Required of seniors in General Textiles and Weaving and Designing Options. Elective 
for others. 

Operations and fixing of dobby, pick and pick and jacquard looms ; prefaration of 
warps to weave rayon, wool and fine cotton fabrics ; building of box, dobby and multiplier 
chains. 

173 



One 2-hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Moser, Berry. 

TX 452. Weaving Technology 0-2 

Prerequisite: TX 451. 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing Option. 

Continuation of Tex. 451 with special emphasis upon making original designs for dobby 
fabrics, preparing the warps and weaving the fabrics. 

One 4-hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Moser, Berry. 

TX 4fil. Design IV 3-0 

Prerequisite: TX 361. 

Required of seniors in General Textiles and Weaving and Designing Options. Elective 
for others. 

A details study of the design and weave of complicated fabrics such as double cloth, 
corduroy, velveteen, crepe and intricate figured designs, matellasse, velvet and frieze. 

Analyzing samples of cotton, wool, worsted, linen, rayon and silk fabrics for size of 
yarns, ends and picks per inch, weight of warp and filling, so as to accurately repro- 
duce samples analyzed ; obtaining design drawing in draft, chain, and reed plan for 
fancy fabrics, such as stripes, checks, extra warp and extra filling figures, leno fabrics, 
jacquard fabrics, draperies. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Berry. 

TX 471. Development of Woven Designs 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: TX 361. 

Elective. 

A study of the factors which determine the quality, style and color of fabrics, including 
the design specifications and production calculations necessary for the translation of design 
ideas into woven textiles. Mr. Whittier and Staff 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

TX 472. Fabric Analytics 2-2 

Prerequisite: TX 361. 

A supplementary course in fabric structure to demonstrate how fabrics can be designed 
to meet specific requirements for utility and aesthetic value. The methods and calculations 
involved in predetermining weight, cast, texture, strength extensibility, thickness and other 
important properties of fabrics are explained, using actual cases of consumer problems as 
examples. Mr. Whittier. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

TX 473. Fabric Characteristics 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: TX 361. 

Elective. 

A study of the identification, classification and utilization of woven fabrics and how 
these are affected by various properties such as geometry, weave, and finish. Actual in- 
spection of a wide range of fabrics with emphasis on a study of defects and their influence 
on quality will be included in the laboratory work. 

One 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Whittier. 

Textile Chemistry 

TC 403, 404. Textile Chemistry IV 4-4 

Prerequisite: TC 304. 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry. 

A continuation of TC 303 and 304 with special emphasis on modern dyeing methods. 
Laboratory exercises and use of pilot and mill-scale equipment of many types in dyeing 
all important fibers and fiber mixtures. Selected topics of importance to the textile chemist 
with special attention to current technological advances in the field. Visits to mills selected 
to cover a wide variety of processing techniques. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week. Mr. Campbell. 

TC 411. Textile Chemical Analysis I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Chem. 211. 

Elective for students in Textile Chemistry. 

Analysis and evaluation of textile chemicals and related materials such as water, soap, 
wetting agents, synthetic detergents, bleaching and stripping agents, and finishing com- 
pounds. Identification and quantitative determination of materials employed in several 
categories of textile wet processing such as sizes, surface-active agents, dyestuffs and 
finishes. 

One 1-hour lecture and one 4-hour laboratory per week. Messrs. Rutherford, Campbell. 

TC 412. Textile Chemical Analysis II 8 or 3 

Prerequisites: Chem. 211 and TC 304. 
Elective for students in Textile Chemistry. 

Analysis of textile materials involving specialized instruments and techniques such as 
spectrophotometry, pH measurements, electrometric titration, viscometry, etc. 

One 1-hour lecture and two 2-hour laboratories per week. Messrs. Rutherford, Campbell. 

TC 421. Fabric Finishing I 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: TC 201. 

Required of seniors in Synthetics option. Elective for others, except not required nor 
elective for students in Textile Chemistry. 

174 



A general course in fabric finishing designed for students not majoring in Textile Chem- 
istry. Emphasis placed on finishes used on garment-type fabrics, including stabilization 
finishes, water repellency, crease resistance, moth and mildew proofing, fire-proofing, etc. 
Emphasis on chemistry of finishes varied to fit requirements of students. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. Messrs. Hayes, Rutherford. 

TC 423. Fabric Finishing II S-0 

Prerequisite: TC 304. 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry. 

A study of the compounds used in the finishing of fabrics, and of the methods used 
in laboratory development and plant application of finishing compounds. Studies of tha 
methods of evaluation of finishes are included in the laboratory work. 

One 1-hour lecture and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Campbell. 

TC 431. Textile Printing 0-3 

Prerequisite: TC 304. 

Required of students in Textile Chemistry. 

Fundamentals of textile printing with major emphasis on modern roller printing methods; 
design of printing machines, preparation of cloth for printing, formulation and proper- 
ties of printing pastes, application techniques for all important types of dyestuff, styles 
of printing, and ageing and aftertreating procedures. 

One 1-hour lecture and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Campbell. 

General Textile Courses 

TX 483. Textile Cost Methods 2 or 2 

Prerequisites: TX 301 and TX 361. 

Required of seniors in Textiles except those in Management Option. 

A survey of cost methods applicable to textile mills with emphasis on calculations, the 
preparation of cost reports, and ther use in cost control. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Shinn. 

TX 484. Mill Organization 0-3 

Prerequisites: TX 301 and senior standing. 

Required of seniors in Textiles. 

Economic aspects of mill practices in buying cotton including cotton hedging techniques, 
price support programs, and mill rules governing buying ; inventory methods ; textile fac- 
toring ; planning and scheduling of manufacturing contracts ; analysis of manufacturing 
organizations based on processes and equipment. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FIBER AND YARN TECHNOLOGY 

TX 501. Yarn Technology Seminar 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: X 401 or equivalent and consent of instructor. 

Elective 

Lecture and discussion periods are designed for students who are par- 
ticularly interested in the yarn manufacturing aspects of the textile in- 
dustry. Subject matter will include such various aspects as training meth- 
ods, safety programs, modern mill design, specialized techniques in set- 
ting rates, employee relations, and developments that arise from technical 
meetings. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Grover and Graduate Staff. 

TX 521. Testing and Quality Control 4-0 

Prerequisite: TX 327. 

Required of students in Quality Control option. Elective for others. 

Testing of natural and man-made fibers and of yarns and fabrics with 
emphasis on advanced testing techniques. Consideration of quality con- 
trol programs, including "defect preventive" methods, pin-pointing of trou- 
bles, and the relationship between the quality control department and 
operating divisions. Technical report writing, literature research, and 
study of military specifications and U. S. Government standards as CCC- 
T-191-b. Attendance at technical meetings such as The Fiber Society, Amer- 

175 



ican Society for Testing Materials, American Society for Quality Control 
is encouraged. Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

TX 522. Textile Testing III 0-4 

Prerequisite: TX 521, or graduate standing with approval of instructor. 

Required of students in Quality Control Option. Elective for others. 

Mechanics of textile fabrics, with emphasis on the application of en- 
gineering criteria to laboratory evaluation of natural and man-made fibrous 
materials. Stress-strain relationships, modifications due to impact, tor- 
sional properties, thermoplastic-material degradation, permeability to gases 
and liquids, theory of induced wear with influence of abrasion. Influence on 
fabric properties resulting from blending of fibers, and modification of 
properties by varying fiber distribution. Specialized techniques of control- 
ling attributes and variables of fabric quality. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey. 

TX 525. Advanced Textile Microscopy 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: TX 327. 

Elective. 

Experiments, lectures and demonstrations in more advanced techniques 
of textile miscroscopy. Detailed studies of structures of fibers covered in 
lecture series, supplemented by experiments on lecture topics. Detailed 
study of all types of microscopes and their uses in textiles. Preparation of 
slides for photography. Uses of photomicrographic equipment. 

Lectures and laboratories arranged. Mr. Stuckey. 

FABRIC DEVELOPMENT 

TX 551. Complex Woven Textile Structures 0-3 

Prerequisites: TX 451, TX 461. 

Elective. 

Consideration of design factors, operational problems, and fabric geom- 
etry peculiar to complex woven textile structures such as terry cloth, plush, 
ability for specific end uses. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week. Mr. Berry. 

TX 561. Special Weave Formations 0-2 

Prerequisite: TX 461. 

Required of Seniors in Weaving and Designing Option. Elective for others. 

The development of design specifications for selected complex fabrics 
and a study of the geometrical and aesthetic factors influencing their suit- 
and carpeting. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Berry. 

TX 562. Jacquard Design and Weaving 0-3 

Prerequisite: TX 361. 

Required of Seniors in Weaving and Designing Option. Elective for others. 

The application of punched card techniques to the design and manufac- 

176 



ture of certain fabrics having intricate decorative patterns and special 
surface characteristics. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week. 

Mr. Berry. 

TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

TC 501. Seminar in Textile Chemistry 0-2 

Prerequisite: TC 403. 

Elective for Textile Chemistry students. 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal 
sources of textile chemical literature and to emphasize the importance 
of keeping abreast of developments in the field of textile chemistry. Par- 
ticular attention is paid to the fundamentals of technical writing. Reports. 

Lectures arranged. Mr. Campbell, Graduate Staff. 

TC 511. Chemistry of Fibers 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 422. 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry. 

A lecture course emphasizing the theory of fiber structure; the rela- 
tionship between the chemical structure and physical properties of natural 
and synthetic fibers; the nature of the chemical reactions that produce 
degradation of fibers; the production of synthetic fibers. 

Three 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Rutherford. 

TC 512 (CH 512). Chemistry of High Polymers 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 341 or CH 531. 

Principles of polymer synthesis including condensation, addition, and 
ionic polymerization; techniques of bulk, solution, and emulsion polymeri- 
zation; physical-chemical studies including preparation, solution proper- 
ties, and size, structure, and mechanical properties of macro-molecules. 

Mr. Cates. 

TC 521. Textile Chemical Analysis III 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: TC 421. 

Elective for all textile students except those majoring in Textile Chemis- 
try; no credit allowed for those majoring in Textile Chemistry. 

The work includes the chemical identication of fibers, the qualitative 
and quantitative analysis of fiber blends by chemical means, and the eval- 
uation techniques for dyed and finished materials. 

Lectures and laboratories arranged. Graduate Staff. 

GENERAL TEXTILES 

TX 581. Instrumentation and Control 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PY 212. 

Required of all seniors in Textiles and Textile Chemistry. 

A lecture series with coordinated laboratory exercises designed to fa- 
miliarize the student with the theory and application of instruments and 
control apparatus that he will find in the modern textile plant. 

The studies cover the measurement and control of temperature, humidity, 

177 



pressure, flow and liquid level, and the application of control apparatus 
to chemical processes and physical finishing of textile products. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Asbill. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

TX 601, 602. Yarn Manufacture 3-3 

Prerequisites: TX 401 or equivalent. 

Studies of advanced techniques in textile production; the technological 
aspects of fiber properties in relation to processing; studies of research 
findings and application of these to processing equipment. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby. 

TX 621. Textile Testing IV 2 or 2 

Prerequisites: TX 522 or equivalent. 

Design of textile laboratories, including conditioning equipment and in- 
struments required for specific needs; performance of tests and analysis 
of data on industrial problems; specialized physical tests; inter-laboratory 
tests and analysis; study of A.S.T.M. specifications and work on task 
groups for the A.S.T.M. Society. Mr. Hamby. 

TX 631. Synthetics IV 0-2 

Prerequisites: TX 433 or equivalent. 

Setting up of an assigned project on problems peculiar to the processing 
of continuous filament yarns, particularly in the initial preparatory stages 
of processing, including sizing, twisting, winding, and associated problems. 

Mr. Hamby. 

TX 641, 642. Advanced Knitting Systems and Mechanisms. 3-3 

Prerequisites: TX 441 or equivalent. 

A critical study of inventions which have contributed to the development 
of the modern knitting industry; knitting needles and their adaptation 
for specific uses; means for mounting them for individual and en masse 
operation; construction and functioning of cooperating elements including 
sliders, jacks, sinkers, dividers, pressing elements, narrowing and widen- 
ing points, welting mechanisms; yarn feeding elements, fabrics tensioning 
and draw-off motions, regulating mechanisms; timing and control chains 
and cams. Use will be made of patent literature which represent important 
developments in the knitting industry. Mr. Shinn. 

TX 643. Knitting Research Credits by arrangement. 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 8 credits in knitting technology. 

Problems of specific interest to the knitting industry will be assigned 
for study and investigation. The use of experimental methods will be em- 
phasized. Attention will be given to the preparation of reports for publi- 
cation. Graduate Staff. 

TX 651, 652. Fabric Development and Construction 3-3 

Prerequisite: B.S. Degree in Textiles (Weaving and Designing option) 
or equivalent. 

178 




Fish growth studies using scales. 




Research on the biology of the gray squirrel. 



Application of advanced technology to the development and construction 
of woven fabrics. Mr. Whittier. 

TX 681. Textile Research Credits by Arrangement 

Problems of specific interest to the textile industry will be assigned for 
for study and investigation. The use of experimental methods will be em- 
phasized. Attention will be given to the preparation of reports for publi- 
cation. The master's thesis may be based upon the data obtained. 

Graduate Staff. 

TX 683. Seminar 1 or 1 

Discussion of scientific articles of interest to textile industry; review 
and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff. 

TC 605. Physical Chemistry of Dyeing 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: CH 422, PY 212, CH 342. 

Dyeing is treated as physico-chemical process emphasizing equilibria, 
kinetics, and practical aspects of research into dyeing processes. 

Mr. Cates. 

TC 606. Chemistry of Fiber-Forming High Polymeric Systems 3 or 3 

Prerequisite Courses: CH 422, PY 212, CH 342. 

The course will embody studies of the mechanism and kinetics of poly- 
merization, the properties and behavior of high-polymer solutions, the 
mechanical behavior of natural and synthetic fibrous materials as related 
to molecular structure. Mr. Ci.tes. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Frederick Schenck Barkalow, Jr., Head, Bartholomew 
Brandner Brandt (Emeritus), Daniel Swartwood Grosch, Reinard 
Harkema, Thomas Lavelle Quay. 

Associate Professor: William Walton Hassler. 

Assistant Professor: John A. Santoluctto. 

The Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered 
in Animal Ecology and Wildlife Biology. Graduate programs leading to 
advanced degrees in Animal Parasitology and other fields of Zoology can 
be arranged in cooperation with the Department of Zoology of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

The new 0. Max Gardner Biological Laboratories building has excellent 
facilities for training and research. The classrooms and laboratories are 
furnished with modern equipment. Spacious graduate student offices are 
available as well as a number of well-equipped research laboratories which 
provide space for graduate students' investigations. Excellent library 
facilities are provided for advanced study in the special areas of Zoology 
in which graduate degrees are offered. 

Accommodations are provided for the well-curated teaching collections of 
fish, reptiles and amphibians. A large bird and mammal range adequate 

179 



to contain an estimated 25,000 specimens is on the same floor as the wild- 
life teaching laboratory. Comparison collections are available for food 
habits research studies on all native game animals. 

Excellent facilities for life history and ecologic studies are available 
in the field of animal parasitology. A large autopsy and specimen prepara- 
tion laboratory is housed in an adjacent building, which also includes an 
aquarium room, small mammal room, and dermestid room. 

A number of farm ponds ranging in size from two to seven acres are 
located on the state lands near Raleigh and are available for farm pond 
research studies. Several experimental nursery pools are located adjacent 
to Gardner Hall, and additional facilities near Fayetteville have been 
made available through a cooperative program with the North Carolina 
Wildlife Resources Commission. 

Equipment and facilities are available for undertaking graduate prob- 
lems in marine and estuarine fisheries. 

A wide variety of positions are open to students holding advanced de- 
grees in Animal Ecology and Wildlife Biology. There is particular need for 
young men with training in parasitology and related subjects. While the 
various state game and fish departments, United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, United States Forest Service, United States Soil Conservation 
Service, United States National Parks Service, and other state and land use 
departments employ the majority of graduates, an increasing number of 
teaching positions in these fields are available. There are, moreover, more 
vacancies currently available for qualified individuals than can be adequate- 
ly filled. It appears that this condition will prevail for at least several more 
years. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ZO 452. Animal Microtechnique 0-3 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, and CH 203. 

The theory and practice of preparing temporary and permanent histological mounta for 
microscopic study. Mr - Harkema. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ZO 501. Ornithology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 103. 

The biology and classification of birds. Field trips for the study and 
identification of local forms, including trips to Lake Mattamuskeet in 
February and the coast in May. Individual research projects on nesting 
populations. Mr. Quay. 

ZO 513. Advanced Animal Physiology I 3-0 

Prerequisite: ZO 301. 

The comparative physiology of selected systems. Topics will be chosen 
for detailed consideration in lectures, collateral reading, and class dis- 
cussion. Each student will, in addition, prepare a term report. A few topics 
for study may be determined by the interests of the students and by 
their needs as may be expressed by the supervisor of their major work. 

Mr. Santolucito. 



180 



ZO 520. Fishery Science 3-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and approval of the instructor. 

This course is intended as an introduction to the principles and methods 
of fishery science. Current theories and practices of fish management will 
be studied. Life history and biology of important game and commercial 
species. Survey of fishery resources. Mr. Hassler. 

ZO 521. Fishery Science 0-3 

Prerequisites: ZO 520 and ST 311. 

An analysis of fishery research methods and objectives. Detailed studies 
of the procedures for estimating fish populations, annual reproduction, 
mortality rates, growth rates, and exploitation rates. The relationship 
between natural fluctuations in fisheries and environmental factors. 

Mr. Hassler. 

ZO 522. Animal Ecology 0-3 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and BO 103. 

The interrelations of animals and their environments — land fresh water, 
marine. Mr. Quay. 

*ZO 532 (GN 532). Biological Effects of Radiations 0-3 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and approval of instructor. 

Recommended Correlatives: GN 411, ZO 301, and BO 421. 

Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible 
spectrum) on biological systems, to include both morphological and physiol- 
ogical aspects in a consideration of genetics, cytology, histology, and 
morphogenesis. Mr. Grosch. 

ZO 541. Cold-blooded Vertebrates (Ichtyology) 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 103. 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of fishes. Lectures, 
laboratories, and field trips dealing with the systematic positions, life 
histories, interrelationships, and distribution of the particular groups of 
fishes selected in accordance with the needs and interests of the class. 

Mr. Hassler. 

***ZO 542. Cold-blooded Vertebrates (Herpetology) 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 103. 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of amphibians and 
reptiles. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips dealing with the systematic 
positions, life histories, interrelationships, and distribution of the particular 
groups of amphibians and reptiles selected in accordance with the needs 
and interests of the class. Mr. Hassler. 

ZO 544. Mammalogy 3-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, ZO 223, and approval of instructor. 
The classification, identification, and ecology of the major mammalian 
groups. Mr. Barkalow. 

***ZO 545. Histology 0-4 

Prerequisite: ZO 103. 
The microscopic anatomy of animal tissues. Mr. Roberts. 

• Spring 1960 
••• Spring 1961 

181 



ZO 551, 552. Wildlife Science 3-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 206. 

The principles of wildlife management and their application are studied 
in the laboratory and in the field. Designed primarily for seniors majoring 
in Wildlife Biology. Mr. Barkalow. 

*ZO 561. Animal Embryology 0-4 

Prerequisite: ZO 103. 

The study of fundamental principles which apply in the achievement of 
complex animal structure, including both invertebrate and vertebrate 
materials. Correlative laboratory study to provide training in the basic 
disciplines and techniques. This course is intended for advanced students 
in entomology, animal industry, poultry science, and zoology. 

Mr. Roberts. 

ZO 571. Special Studies Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and approval of the instructor. 
A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in Zoology, 
accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three 
credits allowed toward the bachelor's degree, six toward the master's de- 
gree, and nine toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

****ZO 591. Parasitology I 4-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and 223. 

The study of the morphology, biology, and control of the parasitic 
protozoa and helminths of man, domestic and wild animals. 

Mr. Harkema. 

*ZO 592. (ENT. 582). Parasitology II. (Medical Entomology) 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312. 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic arthro- 
pods of man, domestic and wild animals. Mr. Harkems. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ZO 603. Advanced Parasitology 0-3 

Prerequisites: ZO 591 and 592. 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism; 
taxonomy, physiology, and immunology of animal parasites. 

Mr. Harkema. 

ZO 614. Advanced Animal Physiology II 3-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 301, and approval of the instructor. 

Selected fundamental principles in physiology will be studied and in- 
terpreted for their relation to the vertebrates. Lectures and critical re- 
ports to promote acquaintance with general literature and recent advances. 
Lectures, discussions, written and oral reports. Mr. Santolucito. 

ZO 622. Seminar 1-1 

The presentation and defense of current literature papers dealing either 

• Spring 1960 
♦•** Fall 1961 

182 



with the findings of original research or with fundamental biological con- 
cepts. Graduate Staff. 

***ZO 627. Zoogeography 3-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 522, and approval of instructor. 
The geographic distribution of animals — land, fresh water, marine. 

Mr. Quay. 

ZO 641. Research in Zoology Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology, and approval of the 
instructor. 

Problems in development, life history, morphology, physiology, ecology, 
game management, taxcnomy, or parasitology. A maximum of six credits 
is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the doc- 
torate Graduate Staff. 



••••Fall 1961 

183 



INDEX 



Administration, Officers of 7, 8 

Administrative Board: 

Chapel Hill Members 8 

State College Members 7 

Woman's College Members 8 

Admission : 

provisional admission 26 

regular graduate students 26 

requirements 26 

to candidacy 28 

unclassified 26 

Advisory Committees 30 ; 36 

Aeronautical Engineering 124 

Agricultural Economics 44 

Agricultural Education 82 

Agricultural Engineering 48 

Agronomy 51 

Animal Industry 61 

Bacteriology 64 

Botany 64 

Calendar : 

1960-61 3 

1961-62 6 

Ceramic Engineering 132 

Chemical Engineering 67 

Chemistry 63 

Civil Engineering 67 

Computing Facilities 25 

Course of Study 80 ; 36 

Course Loads: 

for faculty members 27 

for seniors 28 

maximum 27 

part-time students 27 

Course numbers 43 

Dairy Manufacturing 72 

Diesel Engineering 124 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree: 

admission to candidacy 89 

advisory committee 86 ; 39 

diploma fee 42 

dissertation 37 

examination committee 87-39 

final examination 38 

language requirements 36 

plan of study 36 

preliminary (qualifying) 

examination 87 

procedures 89 

resident requirements 36 

Economics 74 

Education 79 

Electrical Engineering 90 

Engineering Honors 94 

Engineering Mechanics 95 

Engineering Research, 

Department of 23 

English: 

examination in 81 ; 37 

requirements for foreign students 31 ; 37 

Entomology 97 

Examinations: 

language 31 ; 86 

Master's 81 

Ph.D. qualifying 37 

Ph.D. final oral 38 

physical 28 

Examining Committee 81 ; 37 

Executive Council, Members of 7 

Extension Education 43 

Fees 41 

Fellowships 42 

Field Crops 100 

Foreign Language : 

examinations in 31 : 36 

requirements for degrees 31; 36 

Forestry 102 

Genetics 108 

Geological Engineering 134 

Grades 80 

Graduate appointments: 

applications 42 

asaistantships 43 

fee regulations 41 

184 



fellowships 42 

research assistantships 43 

Graduate Credit: 

for correspondence courses 29 

for extension courses 29 

for faculty members 27 

for seniors 28 

Graduate degrees offered .26; 28; 32; 35 
Graduate Faculty: 

conditions of membership in 8 

members of 8 

See list under each department. 
Graduate Record Examinations ...26; 34 
Graduate School, organization of ...23 

History Ill 

Horticulture 113 

Industrial Arts 83 

Industrial Education 83 

Industrial Engineering 116 

In-State Students, definition of 42 

Language Requirements: 

for Master of Science 81 

for Doctor of Philosophy 36 

Library resources of 24 

Master's degree in a professional field 32 

Master of Science degree 28 

advisory committee 30 ; 84 

candidacy 28 

course work requirements 29 

major field 30 

minor field 30 

oral and written examinations 31 

plan of study 30 

residence requirements 29 

scholastic requirements 80 

summary of procedures 84 

thesis 81 

Mathematics 118 

Maximum course load : 

for faculty members 27 

for full-time students 27 

for graduate assistants 27 

for graduate fellows 42 

for part-time students 27 

for summer school 29 

Mechanical Engineering 124 

Metallurgical Engineering 136 

Mineral Industries 130 

Modern Languages: 

courses in 137 

See language requirements. 
National Teachers Examination 26 ; 34 
North Carolina Agricultural 

Experiment Station 23 

Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies 25 
Occupational Information 

and Guidance 86 

Out-of-State Students, definition of ...42 

Physical Examinations 28 

Physics 139 

Plant Pathology 144 

Political Science Ill 

Poultry 147 

Procedures : 

for Master's degree 34 

for Doctor of Philosophy degree . 89 

Psychology 149 

Registration Procedures 3 ; 27 

Research assistantships 43 

Residence: 

facilities 43 

requirements 29 ; 36 

Rural Sociology 158 

Sociology 158 

Soils 160 

Statistics: 

Department of 163 

Institute of 25 

Textile Chemistry 174 

Textiles 171 

Thesis 81; 34 

abstracts of 81 

Zoology 179 



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